BWF biomechanics study presentation of the smash

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Tactim, Sep 8, 2017.

  1. Mazin

    Mazin New Member

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    "Interesting the smaller angle for the elbow (more bent elbow), produced a faster smash"Pls explain I can't understand
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    A slightly bent elbow (about 150° or so) allows proper use of pronation.
     
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  3. Mazin

    Mazin New Member

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    [​IMG]
    I do not understand an elbow ankle
     
  4. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    It's nice to see it demonstrated scientifically; I think many of us have been aware that a fully outstretched arm wasn't optimal for smashing.
     
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  5. Kento

    Kento Regular Member

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    Loved the presentation.

    I already knew that you can produce a faster smash when you keep both feet on the floor and this is the only way that I smash for reasons I am about to explain now.

    Before we look into the ins and outs of smashing a shuttlecock, we need to consider why we do this during a game.

    The obvious answer that is offered by a good few players that I have spoken to is to win the point to increase your score to try to win the game.

    My reply to them is that there are other much less strenuous methods that can be utilised very regularly as part of your game plan that can and do lead to winning a point so why and when should we smash?

    The reply might surprise some people.

    We should only smash when we are absolutely certain that our opponent is off-balance and/or out of position thereby minimising the chance of them returning the smash and denying us the opportunity to win the point for if they are able to return the smash then this creates uncertainty as to whether we will win the point.

    So we need to create the right situation from our game-play before we can do this.

    This is in direct contrast to many players who will try to smash the shuttlecock into smithereens almost every time they play their return.

    Remember, we are merely trying to win the point without exhausting ourselves lest we run out stamina as the match progresses which brings me to why I only smash with both feet on the floor, accentuating both the speed and the accuracy of the shot by making good use of my wrist, having used swift footwork to get myself into ideal position in the first place.

    I need to stay balanced after completing my shot and be able to move in any given direction without pausing once I have followed through after making it, just in case my opponent has been able to get to it to effect a return and this is best achieved by not jumping and then having to land with legs spread apart which could lead to a stumble or lack of appropriate balance thereby causing a loss in momentum.

    I generate great speed whilst smashing by keeping a small angle between my elbow and my shoulder and then whipping my wrist at the shuttlecock as my arm follows my hip rotation in the direction where I am aiming to hit it, thereby taking a lot of the strain away from my arm muscles. I find that by so doing, my arm never tires and I am able to sustain my game at the correct pace throughout its duration.

    I hope this will be of help to anyone reading this thread but remember, this is merely my own personal insight on what works best for me and in no way is it meant to be 'preaching' to anyone.
     
    #25 Kento, Jan 3, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2019
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  6. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    In order to maximize hip and trunk rotation for proper body weight transfer, your racket leg does **need** to lift off the floor. Just look at any pro players.

    But yes, smashing when out of position is suicidal. Better to fake smash or half smash or drop, and wait for a better opportunity. Better to challenge your opponent's feet than challenge his hands.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
    #26 visor, Jan 3, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2019
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  7. Kento

    Kento Regular Member

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    Yes, very true for a jump smash. However, as I am tall, I find that I do not need to have my feet off the ground when doing a powerful wrist smash as I have no problem trying to generate a steep angle of trajectory over the net; at the very most, I will go onto the tip of my toes but generally speaking, I try not to lift my feet so that they are totally clear off the ground in order to maintain an even balance.
     
  8. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    @Cheung @lotusknight @Gollum @Mazin
    Is 150° actually called out in the video? I had some difficulty hearing the audio (volume level too low for my aging ears). I did see a graph posted at 23:45 that appears to show something close to 180° (definitely greater than 160°).

    That said, it does make sense that something less than 180° might be best for several reasons. It could optimize the use of both forearm pronation and ISR (internal shoulder rotation). Has ISR been discussed on the BC forum? Shoulder (rotator cuff) health is another consideration. Shoulder impingement, over time, could result from an elbow angle of 180° and a completely vertical arm.
     
  9. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    You're correct. Not 180° but somewhere around 160-170° for the elbow angle (ie. between forearm and upper arm) at point of strike.

    The 150° angle I mentioned before I meant it for the wrist angle (ie. between forearm and racket handle) at point of strike.

    Here's a super slow mo video to look at.


    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
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  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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  11. RichF

    RichF Regular Member

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    I saw this too.

    Some interesting figures in there e.g. the relationship between racquet head speed and shuttle speed.

    For example the fastest racquet head speed was 64.6 m/s (144 mph) and the fastest shuttle speed was 99.8 m/s (223 mph) so although racquet head speed isn't the only factor we can get an idea of the effects of the frame flex and strings etc. on the shuttle speed.

    Years ago when Simon Archer held the official world record at 162 mph I went to the All England and Carlton had a speed gun to measure your racquet head speed - Archer's was apparently 130 mph (I couldn't do better than 120 mph but in my defence I had a torn rotator cuff!) which suggests he only gained ~32 mph from the equipment i.e. 25% increase.

    Although we don't have the breakdown correlating racquet head speed to shuttle speed, taking the two maximums above means there's a 55% increase in speed from racquet to shuttle.

    No doubt manufacturers will claim it's the nanohyperwhackerdragonfiresharkboost technology but it could be better training leading to better technique e.g. cleaner hits etc. And indeed the paper talks about several biomechanical factors such as shoulder rotation.

    I wonder who the skeleton in the animation is?!
     
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  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Nice, but wish they could have somehow included a measure of grip tightening, as that's a frequently overlooked technique of producing speed at the distal end.

    Sent from my SM-G988W using Tapatalk
     
  13. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Probably it's a very subtle action that can't be measured very easily.
     
  14. RichF

    RichF Regular Member

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    Pressure pads in the handle?
     
  15. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    It would be another research study.

    The best research studies limit questions to a very narrow question so that you get clear answers and then lead on to other questions.

    I guess they will need to ask for more funding.
     

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