Does one need a fast smash in singles?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Daniel2207, Jun 20, 2018.

  1. Daniel2207

    Daniel2207 Regular Member

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    I am Primarily Singles player and find that when I play against other players that my biggest advantage is my speed. However, smash is not that hard compared to some tournament players this is obviously a big disadvantage when someone can match you in speed because now your biggest weapon speed is not effective.

    Does anyone have any ideas for improving smash power - wrist training, core exercise etc

    Or has anyone come up with a gameplan in singles not based around a powerful smash. When you look at pros even though there smashes are very fast some have weaker smashers than others but still dominate.

    Interested to hear peoples thoughts and opinions.
     
  2. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Depends. At the highest level you absolutely need a powerful smash to finish the rally, unless you are a player with the finesse like LD maybe. Look at Marc Zwiebler, Tien Minh Nguyen, Tian Hou Wei and numerous other players that have to run and run because the don't have that weapon.

    But at club level and maybe even a little higher you can still win by employing other strategies. Deceptive play, good placement, good tactics. All can be used to generate a short lift. A lot of people asked me after watching me play singles why I don't smash more as my smash is quite good. But it's not my style of play, I'd rather play a deceptive drop, stick smash or punch clear than playing a power smash.

    My suggestion: Check out a lot of the later Lin Dan matches and see how he almost never plays a full power smash against most players nowadays. Only patient rallying and half-smashes. Meanwhile you could still try to improve your smash. I'm sure a lot of people will give you advice how to improve it.
     
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  3. Daniel2207

    Daniel2207 Regular Member

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    Thanks, Robert that's really helpful. Since I am trying to reach a high competitive level I am now coming up against people in tournaments that have the similar speed of play to me but also posses that fast smash.
     
  4. dave010

    dave010 Regular Member

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    If I understood you correctly, you're saying that speed is your primary advantage. But you also mention that some players are just as fast as you right? Then you must train to be even faster then you are now to maintain that advantage, or you'll be just average in speed compared to your opponents but with a weaker smash. Strengths and weakness are all relative to who you're playing against IMO.

    Regarding improving the power of your smash, it's mostly technique and to a lesser extent strength. If your technique is good, there's nothing that can be done in my experience that makes you smash more than 10-15% harder than you already do. Much more than 10-15% improvements can be made in other areas. What if you improved the consistency and placement of your defence and returned 9/10 smashes instead of say, 6/10? Then your opponent's attack will be weak relative to your defending ability.
     
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  5. Cesium

    Cesium Regular Member

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    In terms of smash speed, singles is less demanding than doubles. But in single one still needs to be able to finish the rally from a mid-court lift. If you are having trouble with that then you def need a stronger smash.
     
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  6. dnewguy

    dnewguy Regular Member

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    Cesium is right.

    Your smash should be good enough to kill a weak midcourt return. You can choose to direct it to the opponent's body or to the sides but it has to be decisive.
    I have a decent smash even from the baseline but i am too anxious to use them in the tournaments for various reasons:-

    1) Smashing everything drains too much energy even if you win most points.
    I end up tired and weak for rest of the matches or say stronger rallying opponents.

    2) Stronger / Smarter opponents won't allow you to play full power smash. You will always be out of position/balance for a good smash. That will lead to a weak smash or worse an injury.

    But you can disregard my second point... If you have the speed and agility and power to smash strong while jumping backwards/ sideways then by all means do it.
    It will scare the c*ap out of your opponent. And give you a huge psychological boost.

    Cheers.
     
  7. asadafgs

    asadafgs Regular Member

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    In singles, there is another technique for smashing. (Right hand perspective) Your initial swing downwards is normal, but instead of following through to your left side, you follow through to your right side. Normally, your back will also be used, which means a recovery window and somewheres slower movement forwards, but with this, it restricts your back movement also and allows virtually instant forwards movement. Only drawback is slightly less power, so it is not used in doubles.But movement is more important in singles, so you will see it there.

    As to when to apply this variation, I have no idea (maybe personal preference?). In WS, no one uses it. And in MS, players like CTC, '08 LD, and LCW use it almost exclusively, while others like CL use it sometimes, and others never use it.
     
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  8. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Hi there

    An effective smash does not necessarily means it needs to be a powerful one. Power does not comes as the primary quality that you need to learn first as far as if you want to improve the quality of your smashes but unless if you're playing against an opponent that is far weaker than you then that is a different scenario. However, if you're able to execute a powerful smash with high percentage of validity and importantly accuracy, then it does comes handy onced opportunity does presented to you.

    If you're playing against a very good defensive style of player, no powerful smashes will do good for you because you're just playing against your opponent strength. You need to open up the game first with the correct strategy of play so that the window of opportunity can present itself to you for you then to execute your smash.......and having a powerful smash at this point indeed can be an advantage to you. Even if your opponent can retrieve this smash despite he is in disadvantage situation, it's likely the retrieve will be a weak one and likely you can do a follow up kill in your next hit.

    Having said this also, if you're playing against a far better player, it's going to be tough for you to create those opportunities and if that player does has a very good defense, you're powerful smashes will just drain your stamina more than giving you the winning point. That's why at this point, when you're executing your smashes, you need to learn to execute variation of smashes with excellent accuracy to break your opponent defenses. When his guard is down then tactically at this time, it's worth going for that powerful smash.

    SS
     
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  9. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    The interesting thing about a fast smash against a good defender is that if you're not picking your smash placements properly (ie you're smashing onto their racket), then the harder you hit will result in them being able to hit a return shot even harder back at you with interest, due to them being able to "borrow" the power of your smash.

    This will result in you expending more energy while your opponent uses much less, eventually tiring you out leading to weaker smashes, while your opponent is waiting for his chance to counter attack.

    So in the end, better to be accurate in smash placement (racket hip, shoulder, down the line, cross body, middle in doubles, etc), and power variation, and even shot choice (ie fast drop, fake smash drop) while waiting for a better opportunity like a shorter lift before smashing hard.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     

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