Doubles positioning question: Attacking player drop shot

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Bbeaucha88, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    Hello all,
    This is my first post here however I am positive it will not be my last. I have been playing since I was about 8yrs old but seriously for about 4 years. I have read just about everything there is to read on badminton that the Web can offer and love every minute of it. My question today is a grey area I get into trouble with often when playing with certain people.

    While on the attack, if the rear player drops the bird instead of smashing, who's responsibility is it to defend the net.

    I realize this seems like a straightforward question but far too often my partner at the moment will notice my drop and then back up to take side. Since I have retaken my center-back position, I am not prepared to sprint forward and defend my own drop shot.

    The way I play, and how I was taught, was that the front player is supposed to hold the T and wait for a counter drop or a killable bad return, the rear player is to retake center-back position and wait for a lift to maintain the attack.

    I think the confusion comes from position change while in defense. If you are defending against an attack and you counter with a drop, it is customary to "follow your drop" and take the T while your partner should shift to rear position. In my mind, this really only applies to defense because it does not make sense to force the rear player to attack and then cover the full court to defend his own attack.

    I have gotten into arguments about this alot because opinions differ greatly. Please, she'd some light on the situation.

    Thanks!
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    You're male, ie playing XD?
     
  3. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    Sorry, forgot to clarify. Men's Doubles.
     
  4. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    As in all things... it depends....on the situation, and the abilities of your pair and your opponents.

    Theoretically, the rear player should drop it in the middle or to the side where your partner is. Then there is no confusion.

    The confusion comes if you drop it on your side away from your partner. Just don't do it and there'll be no arguments. ;)
     
  5. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    I think you are right that the confusion comes from dropping it in the corner directly in front of the rear player. However, "Don't do it" is hardly and answer to the question.

    As for the differing skill level, I understand things may change based on level but there is generally an accepted "best practice". Some people serve long and don't take defense but we all generally accept that that is not the correct play.

    I am looking for the correct play here.
    Thanks again.
     
  6. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    A little confused/unclear about the situation. A front player should avoid staying at the T. He/she should be moving back and froth, left and right to follow the shots in play. The rear player is expected to continue to move forward in attack if opponents return is short (in mid-court), but then in that case, a dropshot probably is not the best choice. Rather a smash should be played.

    If it's not the mid-court situation, a drop should be covered by the front player. If the 2 players were in side-side defense situation, as soon as opponent clears/lifts, the defense immediately turns to offense. One player should immediately go to the back to take the high shot, while his partner should immediately occupy the front (not too close to the service line).

    So, I'm not clear exactly what scenario we're dealing with here. It doesn't sound like any that I described above.
     
  7. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    Your right, I re-read my post and it is not as clear as it is in my head. I will try to create and exact situation to work with:

    My partner and I are on the attack, I am smashing from the rear court and my partner is covering the net. My opponents have returned one of my smashes high and deep to my left hand (backhand) corner. I can't get there in time for a smash but can still make it under the bird for a forehand shot, I don't want to give up the attack so I hit a dropshot to my opponents the front corner directly in front of me (it would be my opponents front right-hand corner from their point of view). After making my drop, I take rear-center position again waiting for the next clear so I can resume my smashing. My partner however has stepped back to defense position in our right-hand service box. Our opponents counter my drop with a drop of their own in our left-hand front corner, they win the point. My partner and I stare at each other in confusion and pull out our dueling pistols to handle the dispute like men.

    I think that is roughly what happens during the game when the issue comes up.

    Raymond, I appreciate your detailed response even though I wasn't clear. Hope to hear back from you on the elaboration.
     
  8. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Then it depends on the quality of your level, ie your smashes and drops. Are your drops always tight to the net and not killable? If so, then your partner should have the confidence to stay up front. Talk it over with him and work it out. Of course, if he doesn't trust in your drops, then he's a sitting duck and maybe that's why he's backing up.
     
  9. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    To end all confusion:
    If you dropped straight or to the centre (as it sounds like you are doing) then the front court player should move FORWARDS as soon as he sees you hit a drop shot (he would be a little further back if you smashes). So - your partner should cover it. Why should you cover it? He's closer. There is no confusion! HOWEVER... if your drop shots are SLOW... i.e. falling tight to the net, and are loopy (i.e. rubbish) then I have sympathy with your partner. I too would back away, for fear of being whacked in the face by my opponent storming forwards to net kill the rubbish drop. However, if its a fast and steep drop, then your partner should cover the net.

    If you drop cross court (as visor said) then everything goes wrong! Don't do it.

    Good luck.
     
  10. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    I had not really thought about the quality of the drop. Concidering this is club play and you rarely have the same partnered I think that defending your own drop is a better strategy.

    Your temporary partner doesn't know the quality of your drop, as you guys have said, all he knows is he didn't hear the smash. I however KNOW that I am not solid and am about to drop so I am in the better shape to cover it. If I didn't have enough footing to make the smash, then I probably am not in good shape to cover the opposite back corner. However it was wouldn't be hard for me to step forward into defense position. Hmmmm

    I think in this situation specifically, stepping forward into defense is the better play.

    This has honestly helped because I had the complete opposite opinion coming in.
     
  11. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    Thanks everyone.
     
  12. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    I actually disagree with your conclusion - you should probably just hit a slightly faster drop, and let you partner own the front of the court. You hit a drop to give yourself time to cover the other back corner... so there is no need to go defensive.
     
  13. Bbeaucha88

    Bbeaucha88 Regular Member

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    You might be right, but in my particular situation with inconsistent partners it is better to play defensive. Concidering that these other players are already doing this it kinda easier this way too.
     
  14. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    That may be - but it means both you and them are playing bad doubles - and will not help you or them improve their games.

    Anyway, good luck!
     
  15. Capnx

    Capnx Regular Member

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    imho, if you were countered with a very good backcourt clear to your backhand (left back corner), your partner should take a step back from the T (almost midcourt) and cover EVERYTHING that'd come in front of him or can intercept regardless you drop or smash and you'd be responsible for another backcourt clear. if he knows your style and knows you will continue to attack, then he should also take up the attack-net/intercept-drive mentality. this way you two can keep the attack stance.
     
  16. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    you mean lift and net, respectively.

    Your partner is wrong - he should be covering the net reply to your drop, but not as you stated by being at the T. The T is too far forward.
     
  17. Borbor

    Borbor Regular Member

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    If u cant get there in time for a smash, i dont see how the drop will be of a high quality. You are basically out of position, and going for the around the head drop as a hail mary. Why is the clear out of question? I mean ideally if ur partner knows u r out of position, that bkhand corner shot is his, but u dont see too many club players with that level of rotation.

    So why not the clear?
     
  18. madcarrot2007

    madcarrot2007 Regular Member

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    I'd cover the front net if my partner does dropshots/smashes from REAR court.
     
  19. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    this!! if you play from the REAR court, your partner should cover the net.

    if you play the shot from mid-rear court, things get complicated...;-)
     
  20. Line & Length

    Line & Length Regular Member

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    A couple of points. Most have already been made, but I think it'd help to have them in the same post:

    1) When the shuttle is lifted/clear to you, your partner's position shall reflect where you're hitting it from. In the OP's example, the shuttle is deep. Therefore, your partner should be at least 1 racket's length behind the service line, if not 2 lengths. Also, it's in the side-tramlines, so they should be on the left side of the court, possibly with their right toes on the center line.

    2) This position is in anticipation of the stock (i.e. default) shot. This is a smash just inside (i.e. towards the center-line) of the down-the-line defender.

    3) Upon playing a (non x-court) drop, your partner shall move forwards towards where the shuttle will land. The lower the shuttle gets before your opposition hit it, the further forward he should get.

    4) If the shot is weak (i.e. easily kill-able), then it doesn't really matter where either of you stand. Just cover your face with your strings/other hand & consider a clear next time.

    5) If the shot is strong (i.e. the opposition must hit upwards), then your partner will be able to boss the net. Also, you will have plenty of time to get to a x-court lift.

    6) Whilst a straight drop allows the steepest angle, it does leave you exposed to a straight push in response. After playing your shot, you need to move a couple of steps forward and towards the center. Remember: you are covering the other 3 corners for the next shot (yes... 3).

    7) Rather than completely down-the-line, consider playing between the defenders. As counter-intuitive as it sounds, you will be able to retain the attack easier from there.

    8) If you absolutely have to go x-court (opponents seriously out of position), then you partner shall move across (should be back enough before you hit it) to cover all straight responses. You need to get to the middle of the court pronto, as any return to the center is probably yours.

    9) Never shy away from trying to play the 'right' shot. How else are you going to improve?

    Good luck.
     

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