English. Important language

Discussion in 'Professional Players' started by Nismo333, Mar 18, 2013.

  1. milton

    milton Regular Member

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    Im sure hardly any English players can speak any other language such Chinese even though a large percentage of badminton followers are from China or other Asian countries. Infact I think few English people can speak a second language as language teaching in schools is poor. Therefore I see no reason why pro badminton players should speak a language from a comparatively small island (and im English). Although it would be good for them to learn a few basic phrases I agree.
     
  2. Mulletious

    Mulletious New Member

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    There is a bit of misinformation on this thread about the education system in East Asian countries, but first I must respond to the idea that all badminton players should learn some English.

    As another poster pointed out earlier, the majority of badminton players and fans are those of East Asian descent, with the majority of those being of Chinese descent. It is a bit presumptuous to expect athletes to learn a little bit of English given that their main task is to play badminton. Furthermore, the athletes ability to communicate in English really has no representation on their individual country nor does it have a negative impact. You have taken a very western centric mindset and applied language standards to almost 1/4 the world's population, yet do not apply the same standards to westerners' ability (or lack thereof) to speak East Asian languages.

    As far as the Chinese and Japanese education systems go - I lived in China for 3 years, can speak, read and write as well as understand everything associated with Mandarin, and the one thing that is blatantly obvious is that English is part of their compulsory education. The majority of students begin learning it from an early age and continue into early adulthood, and it is also an important part of their national exam coming out of high school - the GaoKao. Furthermore, when in University, Chinese students have to take an another foreign language in addition to their English courses (most opt to take either French, Italian, or Japanese). The issue in language learning in the East Asian countries is that they have no venue to speak the language, leaving their communication abilities stuck at a very rudimentary level. They are also very embarrassed to speak foreign languages, so, when given the chance, they are less likely to do for fear of making mistakes. This could be the case with many athletes, who may in fact know bits and pieces of the English language, but are scared to speak it due to the image impact.
     
  3. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    .
    Currently, most Badminton players participating in tournaments, are attending as national teams.

    Badminton players are not like Tennis players (as found Li Na being quoted) who attend tournaments as individuals.

    We hope in future, all national teams should include interpreters to help their players participating in another country, not only at interviews, but also to help them in other needs, like for travel, accommodation, meals, shopping, etc, etc, ......
    .
     
  4. V1lau

    V1lau Regular Member

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    Hello guys

    I've Remarque, that the most people from UK, or Europe, can't win a super series. I don't know why they don't learn better strokes or footwork. Denmark is very good, why you can’t be like them.

    I know, it's not easy to learn a new strokes or footwork, but when you make it to the final, the fans love that. It doesn't matter, if you lose in the final or when the score is lopsided. We know that u tried, so that's ok. I think, it also represent your country much better than a dolmetscher.

    I hope some UK or Europe guys here in the Forum could tell that to the professional players. Or maybe you have a reason, why they don't want to learn new strokes or footwork.

    Trollings
     
    #24 V1lau, Mar 18, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  5. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    There are a couple of other issues connected with the language thing, which are not so immediately apparent.

    Many countries either insist (lay down the law?) that their top athletes - those considered to be unofficial "ambassadors" or international stars - should interact with the international media only in their official language. This is not about China - many other countries also adopt this policy. So even if say, Wang Lin could converse with the media in English, she would not, if she were being guided by this policy. Not saying this is the CBA/China policy, but for all I know, it could well be. It could also well be the policy for other countries/teams/players.

    It is very, very VERY incumbent on BWF to provide for capable, articulate and professional interpreters! They are doing a disservice to the game by letting the broadcasters and organisers to get away with obviously ill-equipped -but surely well-meaning - "translators" to act as uncomfortable go-betweens. I would think that at about 95% of all SS/SSP venues, obtaining interpreters with multi-language proficiency would not at all be a problem. It would not break the bank, either. But it would increase appreciation of the game and some of its biggest stars.

    Thanks to an enlightening post by our new member @Mulletious :)
     
    #25 cobalt, Mar 18, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  6. eaglehelang

    eaglehelang Regular Member

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    On the subject of translators, BWF should ask BC members. Often times the translations are poor. Being an English forum, BC members can do & have done a better job
     
  7. drifit

    drifit newbie

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    english
    malay
    mandarin
    hakka
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    am i eligible for that?

    by the way, China has so many dialects. i dont understand most of them, not even 1-2 words in their single phrase. they learn their own dialect in school and mandarin.
     
  8. suetyan

    suetyan Regular Member

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    we shall promote BC as the official forum to BWF. :D
     
  9. eaglehelang

    eaglehelang Regular Member

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    In that case Drifit, you can do the translations for certain press articles here too. Then eagle can relax. :p:p
    Malay to English, Mandarin/Hokkein/Hakka to English all you tapau.
    Wait, Mandarin to English, English to Mandarin for tourneys let suetyan & other chinese ed BCer have the honours. China & Taiwan players speak the 'official' Mandarin in public, shouldnt be a problem with dialects :D
     
    #29 eaglehelang, Mar 19, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  10. **KZ**

    **KZ** Regular Member

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    If you watched CL vs JOJ in all england semis when they shook hands and embraced CL did speak a little bit english "thank you thank you" was all i can make out lol
     
  11. Nismo333

    Nismo333 Regular Member

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    oh yes, you could be right :)! Nice!
     
  12. renbo

    renbo Regular Member

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    Nonsense! China is very far from being an unilingual area! Get real
     
  13. renbo

    renbo Regular Member

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    Actually english courses are compulsory for the players of the CHN team. But the policy is quite new and will be have effects only after a laps of time.
    I think badminton is a very international affair, and to speak english is a necessity for players. The country have to provide for the education of their players - to only focus on the sport is unfair to them and contrary to a good approach of sports - and languages should be a very important part of their cursus.
     
  14. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    The common language for communication for all critical operations worldwide is English. Air Traffic Controllers and airline pilots for example, need to have the ability to communicate clearly in English. It reduces the chances of messing up the countryside with unwanted airline and body parts. :rolleyes:

    That being said, badminton is still far from being classified as a critical operations area, worldwide... ;)
     
  15. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    while it should not be compulsory that player speaks English, fans do appreciate it when players try to communicate with their fans.

    after winning the AE final, Liliyana and Tantowi both spoke a little English to thanks their fans. Liliyana did better than Tantowi but whether their English was good or bad didn't really matter, what really matters is that they tried to.
     
  16. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    what do you mean? tens of thousands of BC members will die if we don't have badminton.
     
  17. gopalprasad

    gopalprasad Regular Member

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    I am available for translations to & from English to
    Hindi
    Chhattisgarhi
    Marathi
    Sanskrit
    Gujrati
    Punjabi
    Bhojpuri
    Bundeli
    Khadi
    Magadhi
    Oriya
    Bengali
    Rajasthani
    Haryanvi
    Pahadi
    Bagheli
    Surgujhiya
    Aghariya


    Alas! nobody needs it.... They all know English here in India atleast the ones who are related with sports.
    On the other side how hard it is to speak 4-5 sentences, Say Thank you to fans,God. I love you all and a few words on what they did correctly in the match and that the opponent is a quality one its always exciting to play against but may be today wasnt a good day for him/her. :)

    Regardless while one is travelling it helps to roam around, go shopping, meet and talk to people and gel with them if you have a common language, I have been to places where there has been no common language between me and the local people and those have been terrible times for me. (Yes, thankfully people do understand a sign language & thats what I had to resort to at last in such places) but I would certainly enjoy the place much more myself if I get to communicate with the people.

    Its a necessity these days! not just a nice to have thing. This is what I would say from a player's per se.

    From the other side of the fence I would say let it be with the individuals, everybody grown up knows what is good or bad for them & how and with whom they want to interact. Its good if they do so in English but if not, I would appoint translators to translate what they are saying into English for the world audience myself. No pressures on my players please to work on & give time to, onto something they are not meant to do, their job is to play and let them channel their efforts into that direction only.
     
  18. kaki!

    kaki! Regular Member

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    Slightly off topic: what are the body language used in badminton? The most common one is probably request to change birdie. Sometimes I see the player holds up his racket as an apology when the birdie hits the tape and changes its flight, or when it hits the other player, but I'd guess that it's unofficial? Actually I think this is totally off topic. Never mind.
     
    #38 kaki!, Mar 19, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  19. gopalprasad

    gopalprasad Regular Member

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    Just one thats - Sign language.

    I dont think you meant the gaze or the looks to kill or raise of fists, nothing like that, coz then I would have said everybody has of their own developed at their backyard!! ;)
     
  20. yayachico

    yayachico Regular Member

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    I have a friend who is a school teacher in Malaysia and she told me that those educated in a chinese school can write and read very good in english but when comes to speaking, its not so good. She told me that they study to pass the exam and exams are only in writting, so the lack of conversation since young is the reason they cant speak well in english. I believe most is the same, they know what you are talking about, they just have problem expressing what they want to say
     

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