Flexible (High-End) racket to generate Easy power/smash?

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by adrd2, Feb 15, 2018.

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  1. adrd2

    adrd2 New Member

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    Hi

    Can anyone suggest a flexible/mid stiff, ideally medium (could be light) racket that generates good/decent power easily.

    I realise that stiff rackets and head heavy rackets tend to be more suited for power, but I don't like using them too much these days due to injury troubles. I'd accept any racket recommendation will probably have a lower smash/power than the high stiff head heavy rackets, and that's alright. Also I'd happily spend a lot if it's a good racket, budget isn't a problem.

    So anyone can suggest a racket that you can still get decent smashes without too much strain. Ease of Power generation arguably is most important. I'd also prefer it if it clears decently too if possible.

    I've already reduced my string tension quite a bit which helps, play mostly around 22 lbs now. I only play doubles.

    Any advice would be much appreciated

    Thank you :cool:
     
  2. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Li Ning N50III
     
  3. offbad

    offbad Regular Member

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    duo7 3U was a lot of fun to whip around
     
  4. thyrif

    thyrif Regular Member

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    Li ning n9ii?
    Astrox 77?
    Mid flex
     
  5. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Li-Ning N50III
    Yonex VT70ETN
     
  6. Babar

    Babar Regular Member

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    Li-Ning N50TD => it is a more flexible version of the N50. Overall mass is pretty heavy, it is close to even balanced, and it has some aerostream tech (holes in the bottom of the frame).
    I wanted something easy to play because my elbow is getting old, and I like it !

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Eastfield

    Eastfield Regular Member

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    Wasn't the GlanZ-rackets made especially for this?
     
  8. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Yeah, but I found the GlanZ to be at least medium stiff.
     
  9. BadmiCat

    BadmiCat Regular Member

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  10. adrd2

    adrd2 New Member

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    Head heavy. I dunno what it is about head heavy racquets, even when I lose light flexible head heavy racquets it hurts (which is what my previous one was). Even a heavier even balance model seemed to hurt less.

    I've seen some of your posts and I understand that you have had Victor Bravesword 12. How would you recommend that, is it relatively less taxing on the arm? Can you generate power easily with it?
     
  11. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    BS12 is very very easy to use and is very fast. It doesn't have as much power as head heavy racquets but it's definitely easy to use.
     
  12. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

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    Voltric Glanz, its not medium stiff. I own 1, it seems med-stiff but upon swinging its 'relaxes', bringing more power on 'whipping' it. Only 1 disadvantage, no hi-tension stringing, rated max @ 22lbs (mine is ok @26lbs but my stringer does not recommend >27)
    Nevertheless, if u r injury-prone u wouldn't want to use hi-tension + hard strings cos that's also not advisable. Perfect recipe to get injured wrist/elbow is light frames + hard strings + hi-tension :D:D:D
     
  13. radu_popeanu

    radu_popeanu Regular Member

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    Do you say that N50III is flexible????


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. radu_popeanu

    radu_popeanu Regular Member

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    What type of injury do you have? Tennis elbow or???


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Yes.
     
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  16. BadmiCat

    BadmiCat Regular Member

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    BS12 is the quickies racket I have seen despite the fact it is in 3U. It takes some efforts to generate power, but other aspects are incredible. BS12 surprises you than you return impossible smash, you just able each anything with it. It is BS12's thing.

    But now, I switched to TK6000 for both singles and doubles and started playing more offensive. It has a perfect balance, clears and backhands are amazing. Power is effortless and great and it is relatively quick, probably because it is in 4U. I personally do not feel any huge lack of speed, it is quick.

    But power of TK6000 is really something, the angles of smashes surprise me all the time.
    I used average tension, and it was just a really good racket which stayed in my bag as a main racket for singles. But once I decided to make an experiment with tension (was not happy with accuracy) and this combination: 4U, 5G, head heavy, medium flex, BG66UM and extra hight tension gave me an absolute perfection. The accuracy, speed and the sound are just amazing, not I play doubles with it.

    I think it will be difficult to buy TK6000 4U now, but Victor has TK Onigiri, which probably is similar or as I've heard even better.

    P.S. I have tried Duora 10, it was too stiff for me. Did not like it at all.
    P.P.S. Here is some info about my experience with Li-ning. I can confirm that N50III is flexible.
     
    #16 BadmiCat, Feb 22, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
  17. xeoreg

    xeoreg Regular Member

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    Like what most people have said, the Li-Ning Airstream N50III is probably the most ideal racket. To me it seems that almost all high end racket are generally on the stiff side and rare to be on the flexible side. I also like flexible rackets and I prefer higher-end ones as well because of better quality control, but those that fit this category tend to also be head heavy. Two high-end rackets that I have used in the past that were high quality, flexible and head light/even balanced would be the Yonex Nanoray 700FX (not 700RP!) and the Yonex ArcSaber 9FL (if you can live with the color!) Both of these Yonex'es are made in Japan so QC is top notch, and they both have either a 3U or 4U, G4 or G5 grip size.

    I have also tried a few rackets recommended here, and I'll give my thoughts on them.

    Li-Ning Airstream 50TD - This is actually my main racket. It's not a high end racket, but surprisingly Li-Ning has AMAZING QC not just for their high end stuff, but for their mid-range stuff as well. I have four of these rackets and the weight and balance point between them are almost identical. Way better than high end Victor QC. Downside is it's not high end, and it won't have any resale value as nobody would be looking for one of these rackets.

    Victor Thruster K6000 - I had the 3U version. It was fairly head heavy, but was surprisingly flexible and easy to use. It's downside is that it's not a flagship made in taiwan product - and that Victor's QC can sometimes vary significantly.
     
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