Forced to quit badminton

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Ephrium, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. laistrogian

    laistrogian Regular Member

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    So you basically made an account just to rant about how you want to quit badminton?

    Either you are a troll or just straight out an attention seeker.
     
  2. LiteBulb

    LiteBulb Regular Member

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    Its your racket. End.
     
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  3. Cesium

    Cesium Regular Member

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    This post seems like a troll lol. OP need to learn how to clear first before playing a game of badminton.

    Everyone I met who received even a small bit of technical training easily end up miles ahead of amateur players.
     
  4. ultimatedbz

    ultimatedbz New Member

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    If OP is serious, could you post a video/recording of yourself playing? I think we'd be happy to give some pointers and give you an outsider's opinion! :)
     
  5. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Completely agree to that. If OP is serious with this thread and seriously wants to overcome the situation, the post a video of yourself. Without that, every minute spent with writing comments and giving advice is completely wasted.

    Until then, I stick to the troll theory as well.
     
  6. Ephrium

    Ephrium New Member

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    The replies till now suffices.

    I have quit for some time. It is going to take some hassle and arrangement to try to arrange for at least two players with at least one to do a recording.

    So guess we will see how things goes. But this is a forum and merely a problem I face.
     
  7. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Not a big problem... you don't win as much as you would like?

    Play for fun and slowly improve or work hard off-court and on your technique on court and improve significantly! Anything is possible as long as you want to work for it. :)
     
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  8. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    People use tripods or put a smartphone down on the floor with a little $5 phone stand, you don't need a camera person. A little stand and a smartphone, and one up would be a tripod and smartphone.
     
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  9. Ballschubser

    Ballschubser Regular Member

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    I think that you encountered a performance plateau. Everyone will encounter it, in badminton or other sports, in the gym or even trying to lose some weight. The issue is, that your training/playing approach will help you to reach only a certain performance level and that your opponents on the other hand will get used to your game style.
    Once you recognize a plateau, you need to change your way of playing/training badminton, if you want to improve and want to break through your plateau. Often it is as easy as to just take a few steps back and restart from there.

    What do I mean by taking a step back ? In badminton you often make a point due to the opponent making an error. If you try to force a point, you will play more riskier shots which will result in more errors and eventually losing the game. So, over ambitious playing will force you into a plateau. So, by take a step back, you just try to play more safer and avoid errors, which will result in longer rallies and the chance, that the opponent will make more errors.

    So, my approach would be, to define small, temporal, realistic goals. What is your goal ? Do you want to win vs person X ? Do you want to win more sets or matches ? Do you want better stamina ? Do you want to be quicker ? Do you want to play better shots ?

    Once you have a goal, try to analyse and track your progression. Why are you not reaching towards your goal, or are you already on the right path, but you are unable to recognize your progression ?

    Try to break down your analysis, try to identfy your issues and try to invest more energy in this parts.

    The number of won games is not a good measurement of your progression, even with 0 won games I have archieved some great improvements.
    Some measurements which might help you tracking your progression are:
    1. Number of shots in a rally.
    2. Number of service errors.
    3. Number of unforced errors.
    4. Even when losing a set, how many points do you get (<6,<10,<15, or even close to 20?)
    5. Percentage of split steps (need to record your game).
    6. Percentage of losing points due to not reaching the shuttle (need to record your game).
     

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