Forehand grip on backhand side

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Metaphor, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. Metaphor

    Metaphor Regular Member

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    So I was reading The Badminton Bible's grip guide and was confused about this advice: "Use the basic grip on both sides of the body, forehand and backhand."

    Could someone elaborate? My coach told me to always use bevel grip when the shuttlecock is on the backhand side, switching towards thumbgrip nearer the net and towards panhandle when the shuttle is behind me.

    When should I use the basic forehand grip on the backhand side?
     
  2. Exert

    Exert Regular Member

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    Use whatever's comfortable ahaha
     
  3. Agile_Monkey

    Agile_Monkey Regular Member

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    what your coach said is mostly correct. just that "using panhandle when shuttle is behind you" is wrong. use panhandle for shots from above head and in font of you. (during drives and pushes)

    use basic basic forehand grip, when shuttle is behind you (depends on timing), so that you can add more power into the stroke with the shoulder rotation.
     
  4. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Actually this statement is wrong. Using the panhandle grip on the backhand side when the shuttle was gone well past the body is the only way to play the shot comfortably. If the shuttle hasn't gone very far, then a regular forehand grip may be appropriate.

    In response to original post - when the shuttle is overhead on your backhand side, use the bevel grip or a regular forehand grip. Bevel grip is my preference and tends to get the best results for a lot of players.
     
  5. Agile_Monkey

    Agile_Monkey Regular Member

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    which part of the statement is wrong?
    what I meant from my 1st post is, using panhandle to take a shot behind the body would not get as much power as using a bevel grip (on the backhand side).

    I was referring to this statement.
    "...towards panhandle when the shuttle is behind me."
     
  6. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Yes I was referring to that statement! My point is, when the shuttle has gone too far behind you (not just a little bit, but at full arms reach behind you) it is not possible to use the bevel grip any more - you need a panhandle grip. Not for power, but because its the only way to keep the shuttle in!

    As in this grip:
    http://www.badmintonbible.com/artic...adjustments/late-backhand-grip-adjustment.php

    That is what I disagreed with - you said the panhandle grip should not be used for late backhands. I disagree - sometimes it is necessary!
     
  7. Agile_Monkey

    Agile_Monkey Regular Member

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    there is grey area between the panhandle grip and the bevel grip...
    the main difference is the positions of the thumb and index finger,
    and the finger power's force of direction.
     
  8. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Well, the main difference between the two is how twisted the grip is in the hand. I suppose this is what you mean though... but then again thats the difference between ALL grips :)

    A bevel grip is more or less a basic grip (although slightly twisted towards the thumb grip). A panhandle grip is twisted in the opposite direction (away from a thumb grip).

    You correctly state - if using the panhandle grip on the backhand side, you would change your thumb position to point up the grip. However, the angle of the racket in your hand is still that of a panhandle grip, as shown on the badminton bible page I linked to.

    In summary - the panhandle grip IS useful for some backhand strokes, but the bevel grip is far more widely applicable for most backhands overhead.
     
  9. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Regular Member

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    Isn't that emergency panhandle BH played with the other side of the racket than the bevel grip BH?

    what the bible was talking about was "shoveling" the shuttle back when it is way behind you while the thumb or bevel grip is used in front of your body (and normal FH grip exactly above your head).
     
  10. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    I am not sure what you mean by "other side of the racket". It would be the same side of the racket as you would play a backhand. For example: you use a thumb grip to play a stroke in front of the body, then revert to the normal "neutral" grip (or alternately play an overhead stroke with a bevel grip, then go back to neutral). The shuttle goes over your head, and you twist towards the emergency panhandle grip, as you called it. You will strike the shuttle with the same side of the strings as you used to play the "normal" backhand (unless you twist the racket in a strange direction - ultimately it makes no difference though).

    The bible does not advocate the bevel grip as just shuttles in front of you.

    Actually, what the bible teaches (which is the same as every coaches manual from every governing body) is the you should use a thumb grip in front on the backhand side, and maybe a bevel grip if you want (unusual for many shots though), you would use the bevel grip for shots in line with the body, or just slightly behind the body (and maybe use a regular forehand grip instead, although its unusual), and you use a panhandle like grip for shots that have gone WAY past you. Like you said - you end up basically shovelling!
     
  11. Metaphor

    Metaphor Regular Member

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    I have played now two months after ten month break because of elbow injury which was caused by bad technique. Until this week I had not experienced any pain (I have corrected my forehand technique) but after I started to hit and practice some backhand shots the pain has reoccured.

    My question is about the role of the wrist in backhand shots. Why some people say wrist is important in backhand shots? I thought supination was the key. Also, do you keep your wrist straight while performing a backhand clear? Then the racket would point at 1 o'clock and not straight up. I think I am bending my wrist (ulnar deviation) to keep the racket vertical and that is causing the pain.

    I am using 'the bevel grip' but when I asked my friend how to hold the racket he told to place the thumb on the narrow bevel. Would this be incorrect? He has a very solid backhand and can easily clear from the rear court to the opponent's rear court.
     

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