Getting beat with crosscourt dropshot after serve in doubles?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by 70andless, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. 70andless

    70andless Regular Member

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    I play against one team often who has one player who returns every serve with a really tight dropshot on the other side of the net and im wondering what tactic to use against it, should i just become faster, should my partner cheat up, or what?
     
  2. PinkDawg

    PinkDawg Regular Member

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    If this player is only beating you with the drop (I will assume short serve), stay forward after your serve and hunt the net, to take the shot at a high point. Depending on the level, you should be able to vary your serve enough to prevent that dropshot from haunting you.
     
  3. Kikuhito Senshi

    Kikuhito Senshi Regular Member

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    If it's a cross court return to the net from your (assumed) short serve then it's yours and not your partners. Cross court would describe returning the shuttle to the same side of the court that it was served from. In fact any net return to a short serve is the server's responsibility to return. The whole point of a short serve is to gain and keep an attacking formation with the server being the net position and their partner covering the rear of the court. If your serve is a high serve (flick) then a cross court return is still the server's responsibility. A straight return would be your partners unless you anticipate a loose return that can be attacked.

    That said, "What can you do about it?"

    Become faster? Yes.
    Take the shuttle earlier? Yes
    Practice your own net shots so you can play a tight tumble or cross court return in response to their net shot? Yes

    A lot of it will depend upon your opponent and how ready they are to attack the net as a response to your reply. The only other option is a very high lift to give you and your partner the time to get ready for defensive play.
     
  4. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    Your opponent cant play a drop shot from the front court. Sounds like you mean a net shot. Whatever side the net shot reply is, it's your responsibility as the server. Don't play your serve wide if you can't cover it. Make sure your serve is good, ie not high over the net!! Experiment with aiming your serve 15cm past the service line to make it fly a bit flatter and faster, making it more difficult for a tight net reply.
     
  5. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

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    You need to prepare yourself mentally and physically to deal with any returns that comes back to front after a short serve. To keep your opponent guessing, vary your serves by flicks or even the position of your short server (to the T, wide, direct at the body, etc). Best defense against a tight dropshot is to take it early and as high as possible. Failing that your choices are to return a tight net shot (away from your front opponet or deceptive cross).
     

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