Help with Stroke Please!!

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Mason, Mar 15, 2018.

  1. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    Start opening your chest as you're moving to take the shot, but don't exaggerate the movement too much. If you stretch/exaggerate the movement, you'll find it very difficult to move into place because your upper body will be rigid, and that will stop your lower body moving well.

    For higher levels of play, they will do this initial preparation, and then widen their chest right before they hit to gain a bit extra. Don't worry about this too much for now. It will come with time. Focus on a comfortable prep you can do while you move.
     
  2. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    ok thanks
     
  3. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    Practiced around 50 stokes with this form. What do you all think ?
    Second half of the video are the exact same strokes but slowed down by 50%
     
  4. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    I think this is a good form for you to try and work into training scenario, or even game scenario now. Ideally you can get this position for a simple 100+ clears halfcourt with a training partner drill, then work it into a game, but I understand how difficult it can be to find someone to practise with .

    You'll find you might need to be a bit more explosive to actually get the power for a clear to go all the way to the other side, but the general shape looks okay.

    You'll likely find it harder to make your body look like this once you add in everything else - the footwork, your partner, your opponent(s), the stroke you want to play etc. and once you get your body/stroke looking like this in a game, you'll have a solid foundation to progress.
     
  5. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    Okay thanks , I’m going to the club today so I’ll give it a try. And I was intentionally not hitting with much explosiveness as my stung up birdie can’t handle it and falls apart
     
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  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Rady-position.jpg

    Elbow height is good
    Position your wrist closer to your head so that the forearm is vertical
    Racquet shaft vertical

    So, this is what was mentioned before


    The answer here is it points vertically upwards..it doesn't face vertically.



    Your racquet face is facing to the right in the ready position. It's ok, some players do this. But there is an important point to come.....
     
    #86 Cheung, Apr 15, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Stroke-2.jpg

    In this image, note the racquet face. If you swing at the shuttle, the racquet face is flat on during the whole swing.

    A very important part of the stroke is pronation - the turning of the racquet face inside to outside so that it is flat on just before and as you hit the shuttle. So the timing is very important. It's not an easy skill and when you first learn it, the shuttle will fly left and right. But once grooved, this will start seperating you away from the majority of social players.

    At this point of the stroke, we would expect the racquet face (the part that hits the shuttle) to be facing to the left (i.e. facing us more).
     
  8. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Once the pronation concept is acheived, the wrist flexion issue should be reduced. If we tried to fix the wrist flexion too early, I feel the whole thing gets too confusing.

    It's a matter of teaching styles: For myself, I prefer to correct just a couple of early basic things at one time and then build up to that. Another teaching style is to correct everything at once giving lots of information at the same time. I have seen the second one in action when teaching and also receiving teaching, not just in badminton but other postgrad scenarios. You know, it's like continuously throwing mud against a smooth wall and hoping some of it will stick. People just can't handle the information overload - they need to work on one thing at a time. Adults ask for more information all the time, and that contributes to understanding but whether that actually produces a better stroke all the time, well sometimes it does, and a lot of times not.
     
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  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    This is a very classic teaching method. I totally agree with the way he stands next to the wall for shadowing (suggested this exercise to @DarkHiatus previously).

    However, the no.2 part where the racquet nearly touches the spine is not necessary. This will make a very long stroke and the modern game is now shorter strokes (most probably due to lighter racquets). I am guessing this coach was himself taught at the time of 2U racquets being commonly available. In fact, my daughter was coached this method in her class by a coach from Shanghai and as she advances, we have to shorten it. A shorter stroke makes it easier to control the direction of the shuttle. So, for no.2, I would not over emphasize it as a strong point. Maybe learn it as an intermediate point and then move on quickly.

    If the elbow goes up properly with the shoulders, and the arm is relaxed, the racquet head will fall naturally behind the back from gravity and that will be enough.
     
  10. Borkya

    Borkya Regular Member

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    Also, maybe it's different for women? My clears go a lot further when I follow his form. Perhaps guys don't need that as much as. ;)
     
  11. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Well my kid is a girl. :) I can't see any biomechanical disadvantage ... Plus, it's decreasing returns with length of swing after a certain point.

    Maybe look at other aspects of your preparation that you don't realise are affecting you. E. G. Footwork, racquet pointing up, timing of pronation, finger power etc. Small errors can creep into one's game affecting efficiency.
     
  12. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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  13. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    my post above didnt come through properly.....

    If I try to have my racket shaft vertical and have my forearm vertical , it feels a little uncomfortable . Do you have a photo or a video of what you are referring to because my guess is I don’t quite understand what you mean ? Here is my attempt to keep the racket vertical but also having the strings facing to the left. In the video below i start with the strings facing right then move into the a position with the strings facing left. But as to can see I have to twist my wrist. Let me know if that is correct?

    https://youtu.be/vEcdYBS8iuw


    Also regarding my swing with pronation. I can definitely work on using a lot more pronation and practice that if you think that will be better in the long run ?
     
  14. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    Also here is an example where his racket head is facing more to the right.... is this what i am going for or ? Maybe I am over thinking this.

     
  15. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    In the video you posted, it looks awkward because it IS awkward. In that stance, you want the strings to face to the right.

    The position in the post below is the one where we expect to see string pointing to the left. To be clear, it is the position when your racquet drops down behind your back (as you raise your elbow) where we want to see the strings point left. Other people will state it is trying to lead the stroke with the edge of your racquet rather than the face of the racquet, and only turning the face via pronation of the wrist at the last moment.

    Hope that's clearer and more comfortable.
     
  16. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    oky that makes more sense, haha. thanks for clarifying!
     
  17. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    So at this point my elbow should be higher then to allow the racket to be in better position?
     
  18. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    So here is my attempts at using more pronation in my swing. I am also trying to couple that with, keeping my elbow higher on the setup and opening the chest up. Let me know what you all think. To me it felt good and looks pretty good.
    https://youtu.be/PAmQKPQuQZk
     
  19. cn1766

    cn1766 Regular Member

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    Thank you @Borkya
     
  20. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Upon raising the racquet, it faces to the right or left, it is not too important. Some players will have it facing to the right (but don't make it too extreme), some have it facing to the left (more classical). The important thing is not to have it face on to the shuttle. you look as if you are more comfortable with the racquet turned out to the right slightly.

    If it feels uncomfortable, you might be holding the racquet too tightly (too much strength at that particular moment).
     

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