Home school, Boarding school, Goverment school, Private school

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Joanne, Apr 6, 2003.

  1. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    california is going broke and will be laying off 25,000 teachers. I think this will force more kids into private school or else get stuck with crowded public school system. Glad I'm longer go to school. :D :D :D *jump*
     
  2. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    With my limited knowledge about "home school in US", almost all the cases I know are kids who will be pro athelets, especially gymnastics, swimming, figure skating. Also, most of them are girls.

    Due to their tighten training schedule, parents might feel very hard to arrange a normal class schedule for them, to let them go to regular school. Therefore, study in home school will make their lives much easier. This way, they can rent facility / hire coach for cheaper price (during other ppl's school/working hrs), and give parents a break about "car ride". Also, some of them tend to concentrate in training in weekdays, and doing school work on weekend. So, they won't be too tired in week days by hrs of hard train + school work.

    Of course, I know my examples are relative special cases. For them, they must have much more exercises than we do. ;)
     
  3. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    hehe, i think i quit school too early:p
     
  4. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Talking about "over crowded" public school, guess very few places in US can beat NYC's situation.

    I know a lot of public school (not 1 or 2, but counts in hundreds) in NYC, there were over 40, even 50 ppl in a classroom, which was designed for no more than 20-25. A lot of schools ran out of classrooms, so, they have to use teacher's offices, cafe, or even formal bathroom (of course, after re-construction) instead.

    The high school I went to, was designed for 1,500 students. The time I first got there (94), it was filled up with 2,800. The time I grad (97), it had 3,100 or 3,200. 2 yrs ago, I was told they grew to 3,400 or 3,500. After turning every single "expandable" rooms into classrooms, they have to rent several trailers and took over the track field ground. Now, there's no more soccer team so sever, but just a baseball team left.

    Don't want to even imagine how many poor kids are there these days.
     
  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Compared with NYC's case as highlighted by LB, Singapore is more fortunate now. In the past, when the birth rate was much higher, Singapore had to house her school-going population in two sessions: AM and PM. Thanks to the double-digit growth rates (GNP) that Singapore has been enjoying for more than two decades (I believe), more money is available not only to develop the infrastructures but also to build more schools, both primary and secondary, and to train more teachers. FYI, Singapore now will consider a 6% growth rate extremely good as she has attained 'developed country' status some years ago, from 3rd World to 1st World status, so they say. For this year, Singapore will have to struggle to achieve even 2%! Things are really, really bad more so with the sudden appearance of SARS!

    Now, most schools here, if not all, have only single-session. This puts less pressure on the parents as pupils stay longer in schools where the facilities are getting better and the teachers are available to help the weaker ones. The birth rate has nose-dived to barely over one time now against more than two times in those baby-boom years and this means Singapore cannot replace itself and therefore has to resort to selective migration policies to help create a better balance to ensure her continued economic prosperity.

    While new and better-equipped schools are being built, especially in the "new towns", and some of the better known schools have been upgraded, the other older ones have been converted to various uses. Although Singapore is small in physical size, the authorities have been coming up with improved blue-prints for the building of new schools. Most schools have a multi-purpose hall which can house at least three badminton courts and badminton is popular. And whenever possible, a field is earmarked for outdoor co-curricular activities. The kids are definitely having a better deal than my time. But Singapore has no other natural resources to count on, therefore the development of our only resource - human beings - through education is paramount!
     
    #25 Loh, Apr 10, 2003
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2003
  6. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    I'm not talking about those kinds of tests... I'm pretty sure the public schools have monthly tests, mid term exams, and end of the year exams. But she doesn't have them, and no competition at all! And from what I hear from her, they only spends about 15 minutes on each subject.

    LB, I've been talking to a few home schooled kids lately, and they don't goto the gym or stuff like that. From what I hear, they rarely go out and do sports, let alone rent a gym.

    Yodums, that's what I meant. No competition, home schooled kids are just studying with siblings who are different grades, so even when they have a quiz, they'll never have to worry about beating or losing to someone.

    Loh, perhaps if the child is too bright the parents will want to home school him. But seriously, if the child is very bright why not just let the child skip a few grades? Just wondering. :)

    Thanks for all your opinions! But I for one know that if I home school now without any competition, most likely I'll be failing most of the subjects. :D And I've always been studying among 40+ students and enjoying it. Can't imagine life without so many friends and fun. I mean usually a whole huge group of us will hang out together after some major exam, enjoying life. I can't imagine not doing that anymore, can't imagine life without Red Crescent/Cross society, without the school badminton team, without sports day, etc. I heard about a story about someone being home schooled. It's like this: This boy was being home schooled, he was taught by his mum. Then the mum passed away becuz of cancer, and the dad had to take over, handling his job, AND also teaching the son, seeing that the boy was learning the NZ syllabus and he couldn't goto a normal public school. So I can imagine how stress up the dad must have been.

    Okay, I'll like to know more about the life of a boarding school. That's one I haven't heard much of. :)
     
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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  8. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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  9. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    #29 Loh, Apr 16, 2003
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2003
  10. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    Oh okay.... from the way you posted that I think you think boarding school is the best among all four types? :)
     
  11. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Well, I think ur conclusion is way too general.

    I've been reading some articles (more than in 1 nations), some boarding schools designed for rich kids, are nothing but some "day care centers". Kids don't learn nothing, but just fooling around. They have rich as hell parents to support them, and the teachers over there won't dare or care to even bother to piss off the little "prince" and "princess".

    At the end, everyone grad. with a 90+ average diploma, and knowing nothing.
     
  12. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    This soudns a lot like some of the private schools around here...
     
  13. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Hi Joanne

    Choosing a school is a rather individual decision. One has to take into account many factors, whether it should be a public/government school, private school, home school or boarding school. Some posters and I have touched on the merits and demerits of these school types and a general conclusion has emerged that it really depends on which country you are studying in. A similar type school may be good in one country but bad in another and also the management and standards of the schools in the same country may be different.

    Let's talk about secondary education, which I believe you are now involved in. Most times, the decision is taken by your parents as to which school you should attend according to their circumstances in life, eg. whether they can afford it if, suppose you want to study in a well-known boarding school in the UK? The child himself must be able to meet the requirements of the school selected. You may voice your opinion as to what 'stream', ie whether arts or science, you prefer and this will depend on your scores in the relevant subjects. Sometimes the school management may insist on the minimum marks and set a quota as to how many pupils are allowed for each stream or class, ie. red tapes. It will be more difficult vying for a place in a reputable school, where the demand for places far exceeds its availability.

    You and your parents may also want to know what co-curricular activities the school provides, whether they have good teachers, what is its ranking among all schools, what subjects is it particularly strong in, etc. Getting admission into the right school is important as the child will have to spend from 4 to 6 years, particulary if the school also has an extension to junior college level. All these may not be available for most of the private schools.

    When you proceed to tertiary education, eg, the universities, the name and reputation of the selected university is important. The very 'good' names in the US or what they term as 'ivy league' like Harvard (Law), Stanford, MIT (Engineering) Cornell, Princeton, University of Chicago (Business School), etc and the ones in the UK like Oxford (Law & Arts), Cambridge (Law), London School of Economics, Imperial College (Engineering), U of Edinburgh (Medicine), etc. are what many bright students aspire for. They know that they are among the world's best brains and normally there are quotas for overseas students from different countries, most of whom are on scholarships. Such universities boast of well-known professors who may be Nobel Prize laureates, specialists in their area of research which may have far-reaching results to mankind. Some of these varsity campuses like Oxford and Cambridge are very conducive to learning.

    Then the "old school ties" through networkings with fellow students may become very useful in one's working life. The cross-fertilization of ideas, cultures, disciplines and experiences can bring a higher level to human endeavours.

    So, there are many factors to consider when making a decision to choose the most suitable school.
     
  14. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    I see... the school I'm in now has a good reputation... in studies and sports. The discipline is good too... especially when compared to most of the other secondary schools.

    The co-curricular activities are noramlly standard... unless it's a new school and only a few activites to take part in. As for the school I'm in now, it's been around for a long long long time... and it's one big school. In form 1 alone(where I'm in) there are 500+ students, with 12 classes. The amount of classes in each form varies, depending on the amount students.

    Anyway, that was a very very long post you made... I'm so tired after reading it. LOL. :)
     
  15. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Well, I would rather say the students attending Ivy League schools falling into 2 extreme. Of course, a lot of smart students getting full scholarship and came out as a successful young man/woman in his/her career. However, there's also relatively huge percentage of students knowing nothing, and got in just because mom and dad makes donations counts in millions.

    I am not talking like "sour grape" since I did not attend them (actually, I got accepted by Cornell back then, but I decided not go, due to very tighten family financial situation at that time). So many ppl talking about, "there's no way u going to fail in Ivy League schools. Maybe u have to be really smart to get all As, but u will be even more well known, if suck enough to even fail one course." Those schools doing that, just to protect their own reputation, while showing how "smart" their students are.

    Therefore, school surely important, but it's all down the the students themselves to decide what kinda future they are going for.
     
  16. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Joanne

    Sorry to learn that you felt 'tired' after reading my long post. Actually, I'm very impressed by your patience and I hope you understand most of what I have written. For a girl your age and in Form 1, you are something indeed!

    You seem to be very happy in your 'reputable' school. Wonder whether it is by any means related to the Christian community. I say this because most of the Christian schools In Malaysia and Singapore have a long and good reputation in education. However, your class size of about 41 is relatively big and it will be more difficult for your teachers to attend to the pupils individually for long periods.

    In your case, you should have no problem with your schooling right now, not until you reach the post-secondary level or what we normally call the "A" level or its equivalent in Malaysia. Right now you are preparing for the equivalent of the "O" level. The choice of the right subjects at A level will probably determine what university course you will pursue when you are about 18 years old. If you do well and succeed in getting a scholarship, that's when you will have to think of which university you wish to attend, whether at home or overseas. If overseas, then you will have to revisit our earlier discussion some years later.

    LB

    Thanks for pointing out some of the 'inequalities and shortcomings' of the Ivy Leaque universities. Yes I have heard of the very rich donating huge amounts of money to a particular university just to have their children admitted, which they will hitherto be rejected basing purely on their academic qualifications. Although many universities need a constant flow of funds for their operating expenses and research. I hope that this 'undesirable' source of funding is few and far between. If this practice has gone overboard, then the university concerned will earn a bad name and professors and students alike will shun it. I believe most of the better known universities will have more regular and acceptable sources of funding.
     
  17. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    I'm not in a Christian school... here it's actually divided to Chinese, Tamil, and Kebangsaan(Malay, no additional subjects like Chinese and Tamil). I'm in a Malay school... well so called. 95% Chinese. Lol.

    I think you mean PMR... yeah. In Form 3 we'll be sitting for PMR.

    Anyway, Loh is it true that students in Singapore have a very stressful life? A lot of kiasu parents... all want their kids to do well... is it true?
     
  18. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Hi Joanne

    Sorry for not being able to come back to you earlier.

    I'm not too sure about your type of school, maybe you can clarify by answering the following:

    1. Do you mean you are in a "Kebangsaan" or National-type government school. Is this the most common type in M'sia?

    2. When you say you are in a Malay school, does it mean that all subjects/lessons are taught in Malay except for the subject English? Do you and your classmates interact mostly in dialects, Malay or English? Is your principal a Malay and does he address the school assembly in Malay or English?

    3. You should know that unless you are adequately proficient in English, you may find it difficult to attend a foreign university which usually has English as its medium of instruction. But the fact that you are corresponding in English means that you are learning this language at an acceptable level. Do you have tuition in English?

    4. Do you learn Chinese (I presume you are Chinese since you mentioned that 95% of your school is Chinese) outside of school since this is not in the school currriculum?

    5. At home, do you speak to your parents, siblings (brothers and sisters), cousins and other relatives in English, Mandarin or other dialects?

    I think PMR, which you said you will be taking in Form 3, is not equivalent to the English "O" Level. From what I know, you should take this in Form 5 or what we term in S'pore as Sec 4, when you are about 16 years old. You need two more years to take the "A" Level. Upon passing, this will give you a chance to enter university in S'pore or other English speaking countries like UK, Australia and New Zealand. The USA has its own university entrance exam like the SATs which someone has mentioned in this post.

    Is it stressful for most students in S'pore and are most parents "kiasu" (in Hokkien, one of the many Chinese dialects, this means something like "not wanting to lose out" in whatever one wants to do - wants to win always)?

    It really depends on the students and parents themselves. This is a very personal matter. Whilst it is true that most parents would want their children to do well in school, they also realise that they can't force their children to study day and night. The parents know that there are limitations to what their children can do and that they can breakdown if pushed to their limits.

    It is true that many parents think that by paying tutors to coach their children for additional lessons, their children should be able to do better. This is all out of good intentions, but some children can't handle all these and instead of progressing, they can do worse. In this sense, you are right that the students will feel very stressful with so much to do - school work and additional exercises from their tutors, thus leaving them very little time to enjoy their childhood through play with their peers (such as badminton) or be active in other things like joining an uniform group such as the Red Cross or the School Big Band or doing athletics in school.

    You see, as a parent, you are concerned that your child may fall behind if he is academically weak. Therefore, you try to help by giving him tuition. Many can do better as a result but some just can't cope and it then becomes detrimental.

    As mentioned before in another post, if only a student pays attention in class and not be distracted, he should not need additional lessons on the same topic. He should clarify with his teacher on all doubtful points before the next lesson. Better still if he can prepare in advance of his lessons. There are many instances of very successful students who don't need extra tuition at all. These students enjoy the varied activities that their school has to offer and they are richer for it. In this forum, we have read of some very active students who have done remarkably well without resorting to tuition.

    So, if a student is able to demonstrate to his parents that he can handle things all by himself, then the parents need not act "kiasu". Then life for a student in S'pore will no longer be stressful but a joy to be able to go to school everyday learning new things and interacting with fellow students. Actually, some students need a certain amount of stress to make them do better. We are all different.
     
  19. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    1. National type. Yes, it's the common type in M'sia.

    2. No, when I say I'm in Malay school means it isn't different, the Chinese and Tamil are the different ones. They learn their subjects in Chinese and Tamil. Most of the Malay schools are runned by Malay principals. And as Malay is the national language, it'll usually be runned in Malay. But in the school I'm in now is usually runned in English because most of the teachers are English-speaking...this school I'm in now is great! :cool: Those from primary Chinese schools usually interact in Chinese, but actually everyone speaks english. No Malays in my class. Only 4 classes in the entire form has Malays. And very few in each class too.

    3. Hehehe... I've been speaking English ALL my life. I don't go for English tuition... or any tuition for that matter.

    4. I don't really learn Chinese... I know how to speak(and write a little), but I don't use it much.

    5. I speak English to everyone... except my Malay teachers. :D And if someone really can't understand English, I'll use Chinese or Malay.

    One thing for sure, I enjoy going to school...joining the activities etc. But mid-term exams are coming up... sigh. Haven't been around lately. But many things to look forward to after exams! :D The Red Crescent society are having some charity stuff, gonna be a badminton competition, inter-class soon, etc.
     
    #39 Joanne, Apr 29, 2003
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2003
  20. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    This thread resurfaces after 8 years.

    Joanne's in uni now, by the way. :)
     

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