how to return a smash

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by megan, Jul 20, 2002.

  1. megan

    megan Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    victoria
    How is it that pple can return a smash. I find it difficult. Am I suppose to dip low or fly high.
    sooo Reply help me!!:( :confused:
     
  2. Chia

    Chia Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    High School
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    i don't know what ever works best for you.

    Just have your coach or your friend keep smashing at you eventually u'll get it.
     
  3. |R|S

    |R|S Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Singapore
    start slow, tell someone to stand right in front of the other side of the net and throw shuttles at you and you stand at your court in a defensive stance in the middle returning them...

    smash simulation!
     
  4. Quan

    Quan Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    BP(Badminton Player)
    Location:
    San Jose, CA, USA
    after you get the returning part down, try different ways of returning... like drop it back or clear it back or my favorite which i learned last badminton season in high school, the drive return... i really like the drive return its an offensive weapon! :D
     
  5. Hugo

    Hugo Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Electrical Engineer
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    If you use the clear a lot and get a lot of smashes at you, then use a more defensive stance where u stand closer to the back of your court area. That way, you can "dig" up all the smashes. During the actual smash return, keep your racquet face square to the net, not facing up at an angle. That way, your return doesn't go up high and allow for another smash. And as Quan mentioned, after your have gained control of your actual return, you can try different methods of returning. It's easiest to return lower smashes at around waist height. Anything higher can sometimes result in an awkward return. As from previous posts, get a badminton buddy or your coach to drill you with smashes until you find a stance and return method that suits you.
     
  6. Phil

    Phil Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2002
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Ontario
  7. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    8
    Occupation:
    currently unemployed
    Location:
    Surrey, Canada
    smash returns

    here are few simple things that might help your smash return:

    1. don't blink!
    2. keep your eye on the shuttle - from the time it is drop towards your opponent, and throughout the smash.
    3. from experience and guestimation - try to best determine the path of the smash.
    4. do not swing your racquet. it is better to first learn to place the racquet in the path, and block the shuttle first.
    5. as you improve - increase your wrist strength so that you can flick a smash return from the blocking position.
    6. is is better to use backhand sweep rather than forehand.
    7. knees should be slightly bent, stay on the balls of your toes. you can gain additional leverage for smash returns with your legs and back.
     
  8. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    8
    Occupation:
    currently unemployed
    Location:
    Surrey, Canada
    smash returns

    here are few simple things that might help your smash return:

    1. don't blink!
    2. keep your eye on the shuttle - from the time it is drop towards your opponent, and throughout the smash.
    3. from experience and guestimation - try to best determine the path of the smash.
    4. do not swing your racquet. it is better to first learn to place the racquet in the path, and block the shuttle first. later you can learn to re-direct the smash, by changing the racquet face position.
    5. as you improve - increase your wrist strength so that you can flick a smash return from the blocking position.
    6. is is better to use backhand sweep rather than forehand.
    7. knees should be slightly bent, stay on the balls of your toes. you can gain additional leverage for smash returns with your legs and back.
     
  9. Chia

    Chia Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    High School
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    one important part is that you can be scared of the bird
     
  10. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    8
    Occupation:
    currently unemployed
    Location:
    Surrey, Canada
    scared of the bird?

    the only thing the bird could permanently damage is eyesight. so there is genuine concern to ensure that there is safety first. since i wear eyeglasses, this has never been to much of a concern, although there is common sense, - don't look at your partner when they are about to attack from rear court, keep your racquet in front of your face, etc. i strongly believe most players should wear some form of eye protection - mainly in doubles.

    when you are smash return position you will be generally around mid court (not close to the net) and most proper smashes are downwards toward your feet. the only fear may be that the shuttle hits you and leave a bruise or welt. that's the nature of the game and you have to mentally toughen yourself to it. i guess that is also where continual smash drills will help to get rid of any phobias.
     
  11. Californian

    Californian Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2002
    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Southern California
    The smash return is in some ways the hardest shot, and others, the easiest shot to make.

    Your opponent's smash will get to you faster than any other shot, so you have to be prepared for it first, then adjust for anything else that comes instead. Make sure you are well-balanced with your racket held well out in front of you between knee-high to waist-high, depending on the probable angle of the incoming smash. Any smash hit to your backhand side or into your body would be returned with a backhand hit. You can even take smashes to your forehand side with a backhand--there are advantages and disadvantages to doing that instead of using a forehand, so it's up to you.

    I think the best way to train is to get a partner and several shuttles. From midcourt, set up your partner for smashes. Have your partner start by hitting slow smashes to a particular spot. Practice trying to just block them over the net; don’t swing at it. As your blocks become consistent, have him/her hit progressively harder smashes until you can return a full smash. Then do the same thing, having him/her hit to a different spot until you can block a smash hit anywhere. This may take several training sessions to accomplish.

    One of the hardest things to learn is how to absorb the impact of a smash on your racket. You don't want your racket to be like a wall and bounce the shuttle back deep or high. You will need to relax your arm and soften your grip just the right amount when you contact the shuttle so the return is low to the net and drops as short as possible. What makes it especially hard is that sometimes you have to quickly thrust your racket into position, yet still relax by the time the shuttle arrives. This may take a lot of practice.

    The next step will be to gain control of where you block the smash to. Practice blocking to corners and straight ahead. Practice blocking the shuttle flat and low to the net, as well as blocking it with a little bit of loop so it drops nearly straight down close to the net.

    Finally, you can work on returning the smash with a clear or drive. Timing is the key here. Some returns will be mostly wrist, some with use a lot of arm. The important thing is that you don’t want to just pop it up short for an easy put-away.

    As for when to block and when to clear or drive, it depends on the situation. Generally, in singles you want to move your opponent around, so you would usually just block the smash away from the opponent and close to the net to draw them in. The closer your opponent is to the front when he/she smashes, the lower your return has to be. Occasionally, you might try to drive the return crosscourt from your opponent if he/she is hastily smashing from near the side line. Clearing smashes is generally done in doubles because the opposing team’s net player will be there to intercept any weak block returns. But ideally, you want to return it with a purpose, not just react. The difference between good players and really good players is that a good player can repeatedly clear up smashes OK, but a really good player will direct that clear deep into a corner.

    Maybe that’s more than you wanted to know. There’s yet still quite a bit more that could be said.
     
  12. Slanter

    Slanter Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wiltshire, England
    One thing I have noticed during play is that it is easy to get into a particular mindset when returning smashes. This can have both positive and negative consequences. There are three main returns of a smash - net, drive and lob. If you use the lob a lot you find it more difficult to do anything else - not because the shot has become any more difficult but because you have attuned mentally to keeping the player at the back.

    The drive is perhaps the most agressive return as it allows you to attack the players next shot. I like to drive a smash back and switch to crouch defence for the next shot which is nearly always either a drop or a flat smash.

    Perhaps the most useful shot is the net return. If you can push back a smash just over the net and threaten the net afterwards the opposition really has little option but to lift. Forgetting about the internationals, theirs is a game apart, it is only the top county players who will be able to manufacture an attacking shot from a good net return.
     
  13. megan

    megan Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    victoria
    thanxs

    I was quite surprised really?!:eek: Didn't know there was a lot to learn about the tricks of the trade;) hehe. Well I'd LOVE to hear more!!! It's quite interesting really. Very useful as well!! I'll test it out. Sounds good!
    Well Reply!!
    by the way megan's the name. Yours?

    cya!
     
  14. megan

    megan Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    victoria
    Thanks for the site. Very helpful!:D
     
  15. Phil

    Phil Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2002
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Ontario
    Re: scared of the bird?

    I've read a story of someone who was wearing eyeglasses when playing, and the shuttle shattered the lens and the fragments went in his eye and he had to have his eyeball removed.

    Perhaps his lens' were fragile, I don't know, but it is something to know.

    No problem, glad to help. :)

    Phil
     
    #15 Phil, Jul 22, 2002
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2002
  16. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    8
    Occupation:
    currently unemployed
    Location:
    Surrey, Canada
    i used to wear prescription safety glass lenses, but these were quite thick and heavy. i now use plastic. i have also heard that plastic could shatter, but plastic does not splinter like glass and could cause damage, but not as deadly as shattered glass.
     
  17. megan

    megan Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    victoria
    Re: smash returns

    Thanks for these tips!! keep em cuming!! hehe:p
     
  18. |R|S

    |R|S Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Singapore
    my guess is, your lobs/clears, etc are not deep enough to the opponent's backcourt, that's why it's so hard to get smashes back!

    how about trying to ensure that the your shots are deep enough?

    becoz there is no point practicing your defensive shots if your lobs are half court etc! those smashes, even taufik cant return!
     
  19. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    21,081
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    Situation

    Are we talking about returning a smash in doubles or in singles?
     
  20. Quan

    Quan Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    BP(Badminton Player)
    Location:
    San Jose, CA, USA
    another neat way to return smashes is behind the back or between the legs, other players mite get offended tho, so watch out when you use it!
     

Share This Page