i dont know if i can choose badminton as a profession

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Tristan Appel, Feb 1, 2020.

  1. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    so - i wanna become a professional badminton player, but im afraid i wont get by. i started age 9-10yo, but im first starting to take it serious now age 13. i just dont know what to do to become a pro badminton player

    (i need some good tips on diet and stuff)
     
  2. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    Great to hear you love playing badminton! You are at an age where it is still possible to pursue a professional career.

    What are you afraid of? At 13 in Denmark, I am very certain that if you don't make it as a badminton pro (e.g. don't manage to enter the U17 national championships at age 16), you can still pursue any other career. It is certainly possible to excel in both school and badminton – many of the successful Danish pros have proven that.

    You won't become pro by following diet tips, or I regret to say, any tips from badmintoncentral alone. You need a coach, or preferably multiple coaches.

    So, first find a coach, for example in a club. Ask the coach about which steps are necessary for you to become pro one day. Focus on the immediate – what can you do in the next 2 weeks?

    At your age you should be having at least 5 training sessions a week, on top of competitions and unsupervised playing. You may need to join one or multiple clubs. Likely you will need to exhibit both good training attitude, skills, and also some results before you can join ever higher-level training groups in clubs and later regional and national (or even international) federations.

    Nutrition is certainly part of the package of skills, but I am not qualified to talk about that. I strongly suspect that the knowdlege won't fit into a badmintoncentral post. Instead, an introduction to sports nutrition – as text online, as a video, or as a book – is probably what you need. Why don't you talk to your coach, or failing that, ask your sports or biology/chemistry teacher? They can certainly recommend a (Danish or English) book about that.

    Best of luck! Keep us apprised of your progress!
     
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  3. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    Find a coach, go to tournaments, and see how far you get. It will give you a reality check what you are capable of.

    Here in the US, kids at 10-11 already competing in national junior tournaments, and most of them won't make it to professional. if you have the will, and the resource, go for it.

    talk to your parents.
     
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  4. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    thx alot it means alot, but when i said diet, i meant like exercises and diets that help me keep in max fit form. thank you alot and im happy to actually get a reply!
     
  5. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Find a good club with other juniors who are competition orientated.

    Focus during training and when you have coaching.

    Enter competitions to test yourself and learn where to improve.

    When you get better, you might need to go to a higher level club. Certainly you might need to go to two clubs.
     
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  6. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    Good luck at following your dream! :)
    Excellent advice is given above.
    Just remember, when you start serious training and going to tournaments, it isn't going to be easy.
    Don't lose heart. Keep putting the hours of work in, and mark your progress by little steps. That will keep you encouraged.
     
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  7. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    Get a coach.

    Here you can have some advice about issue you face & based on our experience we can share you some our knowledge to help your issue. But we cant exactly guide you in specific way to improve all aspec on your skill. A coach who see you, know you, analys your progress you would be able to guide you better to the right path.
     
  8. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    i have a following question, you see i have a coach teaching every tuesday and thursday, and i play tournaments and have been doig so for the last 3 years. but even with all this i still need some advice. do i need to have access to a coach all of the days because i can get it going 4 times a week if i rent courts (which i happily would do). i can also get a sparring partner. im just asking to see if it is nescesary to have a coach all days im playing.
     
  9. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    And... dont forget school :cool:. Study hard and train harder! But never let go of studies. Not only it will back you up in case you can't make it as a pro but it will also give you better life balance on and off court, peace of mind and social interactions (besides giving you an education). Good luck! At your age, no regrets! Try and give your best!
     
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  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    How many hours a week are you training now?

    How many hours are with a coach, including group classes?
     
  11. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    It never be an easy task to do whatever its badminton, car racers, doctor, mechanical, or anything.
    The place where my club play consist of 5 court. My club use 2 & the rest 3 court is used by this coach training junior player from 6 to 15 yo. There i saw many young player from their sucks skill to become skillfull. From their 1st coming to his 1st year & next year, i saw their progress. Some of them is a fast learner & some other is slow. I saw some of his student joining bigger club when they got quite skillfull, but i also saw some other stick with this coach for quite awhile having slower progress than others.

    Doesnt mean to turn down your spirit, but if its your passion then go for it. Try to reach it with all what you had. Even if you fail, you wont regret it as you already give all to it. Well we wont know if we are able to do so if we never try a thing right.

    So have your spirit up & sk your coach of what to do, consult to them as they know better of you than us here that didnt actually see you.
     
  12. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    It is unlikely that you'll become better than the peers in your age group if you train less than them. Training quality is another matter, but what evidence is there that your training&coach is better than theirs?

    You can train without a coach, but that puts additional pressure on to you or your partner to organize courts, structure sessions and correct any mistakes you make. Some people are able to improve just by essentially playing (or doing play-like drills), but a good coach will correct your mistakes much earlier.

    Note that not all training sessions happen on courts: Even in U15, at least one session a week is going to be athletic, typically in a gym or outdoors.
     
  13. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    my coach is an earlier semi pro badminton player, and he corrects all my mistakes ofc i still make more, and i do have training sessions in which i train my physical assets as well. The badminton club i go to rn is the closest to where i live, and ever since your helpful reply i have thought about joining a 2nd club, but the problem is i dont know if that is possible seeing as i go to tournaments carrying the name of my club with me, and i simly dont know if it is possible. so my question is: if i were to be trying to evolve as much as possible doing (for example) footwork, or some other exercise/drill would that help me as much as the usual coach would, on those 2 extra days i could get

    (i do physical "days" 2-3 times a week)
     
  14. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    It sounds like you have a decent setup already.

    Did you talk to your coach about your aims and motivation? What does he think?
     
  15. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    hey i train a total of 3 hours a week on court and about 4 just doing physical
     
  16. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Sorry. Can I just check, this three hours is under your coach?

    And then do you have additional court time for practice games against other teenagers in your club?

    How is your standard against the other juniors?
     
  17. Tristan Appel

    Tristan Appel New Member

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    uhm all three with my coach, and im the youngest on the advanced team and place about mid, but no additional court time even though ill begin having 4 - 6 hours exstra for playing and training my tecnique
     
  18. BThane

    BThane Regular Member

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    Start playing in tournaments as soon as possible to get a feel for where you're at relative to other players. Since you're starting reasonably young, ~32 hours a week should be a decent amount of time to train. 12 hours with a coach (3 sessions of 4 hours each), 10 hours of drills with peers (5 sessions for 2 hours each), 6 hours of footwork practice (6 sessions of 1 hour each), and 4 hours of working out (bodyweight or light weight squats, push-ups, running, jump rope). If you do this for the next 3 years, you should be a strong player. As time goes on you'll add more time for resistance training, sparring, and strategy, and maybe more time for everything else too if you're struggling and need to get better, but in general a regimen like this will serve you well. The more effort you put in, the more likely you are to succeed.
     
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  19. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Wow that would be a lot to take at 13-year-old considering body growth, risk of injuries and education but I guess that's the price to pay to succeed.
     
  20. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    You should ask that particular question to the clubs. It's very important that you gain an understanding of how the world works particularly in your area of interest and regional area. What do they want, what don't they want, what are they ok with, what aren't they ok with. You can even make "General Enquiries" without saying who you are just saying you are making a general enquiry and asking your questions.

    I think you'll be pleased to find that they don't own you and you may be freer than you think!
     

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