Improper smash technique with wrist flexion

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by visor, Mar 18, 2021.

  1. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    I often see KOR female pro players use wrist flexion in their smashes which end up quite weak relative to their JAP counterparts. Now that I see this video I understand why. It's actually coached that way!




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  2. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    but both countries have 'dominant' players in top 10 ranking
    not a 'right or wrong' technique situation correct?
     
  3. baddiechan

    baddiechan Regular Member

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    Thanks for sharing visor, this explains a few things about Korean women players in recent years. I watched some videos of Sung Ji-Hyun, An Se Young and the top Korean women's doubles. For Sung Ji-Hyun, I never recall her having a strong or effective smash and with the women's doubles it's a similar story, they only put it away around half court shots. I wonder if we'll see the same thing happen with An Se Young, she might need a few years to strengthen her body. Her game plan is just to retrieve, wins with nice half smash/fast drops but not strong smashes either.

    The person teaching in the video Lee Boram only played one professional tournament before, so not sure if it's a standard technique to smashing across their national level. In my opinion Korea has always been a bit behind technically compared to China, Japan and Malaysia, looking at MD since there's more athleticism and power their technique gaps might not stand out as much. Just going to mention that LYD always had a blatantly high backhand serve...
     
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  4. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    Ofc it hurts your shoulder if you follow through on the wrong side. What a ridiculous video. Just goes to show that just because someone used to play a sport at a high level they don't necessarily know what they're talking about when it comes to coaching, much less biomechanics. Korea really seems to cling to this old, overhauled pan-handle(ish) technique for some odd reason, remember the overweight YT coach...? :D this isn't quite as atrocious as that, but it's still an eyesore.
     
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  5. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    It looks like she is showing that forearm pronation without wrist flexion, at least from that contact point, and when front on, is a big swing where the racket head goes across and not necessarily in the direction that the shuttle is intended to travel.

    When she does the forearm pronation with wrist flexion, the wrist flexion she does isn't for power.. just for directing the swing more. (So it's not like the criticism absolute beginners get when they use wrist flexion for power and don't use forearm pronation at all).

    Maybe an alternative could be a stick smash with very little follow through (Ie Then can be forearm pronation, without wrist flexion, and a controlled racket action that doesn't swing across)?
     
  6. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    Now that English subtitles were added all she was saying is that with a proper grip and swing pronation should come naturally , and not to force it

    min my journey to learn to play badminton i have found this statement to be true for me. Anytime I force pronation I play worse and my stroke is worse

    when I don’t force pronation my stroke is more natural and powerful
     
  7. khoai

    khoai Regular Member

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    Concentric vs. eccentric. You can't push rubber band forward, only pull backward. I learned about this here not too long ago, err I mean less than 10 years ago.

    https://www.badmintoncentral.com/fo...lear-smash-and-drop.98200/page-2#post-1682084
     

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