Indian Badminton League (IBL)

Discussion in 'India Professional Players' started by depleter, Nov 10, 2012.

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  1. gopalprasad

    gopalprasad Regular Member

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    Dont understand what is this about! The number of available players was available with everyone and with the conditions it was pretty clear that not all would be signed!!
    There are 6 teams with maximum 4 foreign and 7 Indian players allowed each. So the maximum number of foreign players that can be bought are 24 no more, if the availability is more there are bound to be unsold players. The doubles lose out on this count on India. Mostly because India doesnt has a doubles team to boast of and which they can watch thereby the frustrations for a world famous doubles player... Also in a doubles match you have to rely on 2 players to win a game hence theres a downside to investing heavily on a doubles player.
    Jwala meanwhile just wanted to show her colours around it & needs some real spanking to get to understand. If she really feels and believes IBL is unprofessional then why is she going to be a part of it anyways?
    I didnt believed at the start that Jwala and Ashvini were awarded iconic status & so high price tag for the same reason, ultimately the IBL had to revert that because of the franchise who would mean business atleast a bit while paying up and to pay such amount to a player who could not even win 1 match for them is doing no good to their investments... rather go with a little lesser amount for a MS player who can individually win me a match.
    I would imagine there would be singles player lining up to play doubles and get some practice with actually nothing at stake for them ;)

    Everyone knew the stakes & that not all players would be sold/or the money they could fetch. The maximum limit is fixed hence if they invest heavy on one player the other player should come cheap and thats another thing they need to balance hence the conditions from Korea,japan,Thailand or Indonesia which people are gossipping about. But when its business and fair play you would have to give in. Those who understand would encash and be happy those who wouldnt would be aggrevating and can watch from outside.
    Stating the conditions and format from IBL made it pretty much transparent!!
     
    #221 gopalprasad, Jul 23, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
  2. Giga01

    Giga01 Regular Member

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    So...Does this mean that the source that makes me wonder much of this stuff is simply wrong? That they were not sent at all, and thus were not left unsigned? Because if they were sent and left unsigned...IBL or whoever were in charge of that promise lied to them...Or at best, simply forgot to tell the franchises this or something like that.
     
    #222 Giga01, Jul 23, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
  3. Giga01

    Giga01 Regular Member

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    Gah! I guess it all comes down to me thinking it's strange that players are left unsigned when it's probably not strange at all. And with that comes the whole of part of which players were left unsigned, because for me it's just weird that the players I mentioned a while ago were not signed at all.
    Maybe a bit of how the (unofficial?) marketing was done made me think that some of the players marketed would play, like Bao Chunlai. Probably mostly me being confused though...
     
  4. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    I don't know mate. You are right to question it all but I would probably advise to just stop asking the same question untill an official list comes out from the auction, maybe we still won't understand but you are just going to get blasted by people that don't know the facts if you keep asking that, so just wait:D
     
  5. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    This is simple. IBL organisers might have approached Indonesian players and they would have got such replies. So, selection is purely depends upon a particular franchisee's head. If he/she is willing to take a player (even though he may not participate in the league completely) , they are taking their own risk. Nobody will take huge risk something like that after investing huge money..
     
  6. Giga01

    Giga01 Regular Member

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    Yeah, you're right. I'm not really getting much wiser now...Will wait for an official list or announcement.
     
  7. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    I think we can probably draw a line under all of this.

    IBL marketed there league referring mainly to the taking part of some intl players and associations who had never actually signed up or considered seriously going. Which is bad form.

    Newspapers continued to report these assumptions and claimed players were unsold that were never signed up or involved?

    Boe has no right to be making any statements as he did unless he can proof he was owed a place.

    Gutta is upset she got rubbish money.

    The league organizers (not the franchisees) are not very organised:) in delivering important information and probably have suffered massive teething problems and will be inexperienced in dealing with this badminton league proposition as it is the first of it's kind.

    Pressures from both the franchisees and national associations probably didn't help with misinformation.

    The franchisees are in the dark about how this is all going to go for them resulting maybe in some strange looking bids. Maybe they got it right maybe not, they still don't know.

    There are many great things about this league for India and internationally if it really takes off so should be interesting.
     
  8. vpsingh

    vpsingh Regular Member

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    When the number of non-Indian players is limited to 4 per team and the overall budget also limited (275 hundred thousand US dollars) - it is obvious not all players will get contract.
    I can understand Boe's frustration; but to say that because of that he won't visit India again - that's just childish. Jwala should understand she is a fading star - she was "bought" just because she is still popular in Indian badminton circles. The IBL ensured she will still get a purse of USD50k, I don't know what more does she want. Why would a franchise want to put money on a semi-retired player rather than chose a young upcoming player (that too for a far lesser money).
    IBL is being held for first time and given the amount of money that they were able to pool in, I think it is a great attempt for badminton. We get good professional players only when young boys and girls find that they can take badminton as their career and make a living out of it. It is first step towards that for Indian badminton players.
     
  9. gopalprasad

    gopalprasad Regular Member

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    Just now had a look at the schedule. Wow they were able to put in everything within Aug. I was thinking it would go on for a month, more parties, more promotion and more media coverage, repeat telecasts on TV :)
    [​IMG]
     
  10. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    You have this wrong. Jwala was contracted to be bought at, at least $50,000 IBL failed this contract, she was advertised as one of the Icon's then scrapped her event! they put her in a real bad position because they scrapped the womens doubles event, which was the only reason she has not been bid upon otherwise she probably would have met her reserve no problem.

    So let me spell it out for you all.
    A proffessional way for IBL to act
    would be to organize the format of league and finalize
    decide then who would make good Icon's
    finalize the contract for the icon's (cough IR)
    Then, THen publish the marketing material to the world.

    How to do this unprofessionally reverse the order nearly completely that's what IBL did.
     
  11. gopalprasad

    gopalprasad Regular Member

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    They are still paying what they promised so where does the unprofessional bit comes into this. I would have liked them to shunt Jwala out and then may be the retweeting thing she does could have been justified. With Jwala they definitely lost the plot by making her an Icon under whose influence thats something to be known!!!
    Right now I would call Jwala to be highly unprofessional by taking part in a tournament which she definitely has smething to say against! She doesnt need to be playing in IBL nobodys forcing her like they d to a layer in other games/tournaments here.

    Go Out! I would say that would be the professional thing to do for her, like Boe has done by saying never wanna be a part of a tournament which despise, Never putting a foot in the country I would say is going overboard... :)
     
    #231 gopalprasad, Jul 23, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
  12. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    I won't go into if you are right or wrong...
    But the first thing they failed at is to do same things IPL did..
    IPL had the financial backing and IBL doesn't have it to do them...complete fail as a whole...because they should have changed many things in the starting...but they are changed in middle when they knew things weren't going as planned..

    But whatever happened has happened...All I am going to do is, wait and see what happens in the 18 days show next month...If it even pulls some one-fourth of the interest IPL pulls off....I wouldn't be surprised if next year rates of Saina and LCW to go to $500K.
    But if it fails disastrously...It was too early to conduct a league such as IBL which is purely commercialised to be conducted in India...

    But lets see what type of show they even put...
     
  13. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    I have already answered that re read my post. Just because they found a work around does not mean it was professional. I think honestly if you asked IBL behind closed doors you would find that they would tell you they have made a bit of a mess of it all due to bad planning. Let's say they won't do the same things next year.

    I will say one thing I would not like to be boe at next years Thomas cup:D
     
  14. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    There you go I was right:D

    Officials of the league state that the decision to drop their base price was made after an emergency meeting with the teams on Sunday night. They claim that the teams had requested that both Ashwini and Jwala's base price be cut as women's doubles was not in the IBL and paying so much for them would mean that their auction kitty would be hurt. The two, however, feel hurt and betrayed. They claim that they were promised a fair bid but this was completely shocking and humiliating.

    http://www.mumbaimirror.com/sport/tennis/Indian-betrayal-league/articleshow/21261060.cms
     
  15. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    hehehe..:P
    Lol! looks like girls talking about Pradnya Gadre who got some $44k OR SOMETHING..LOL They must have been so much embarrased now...
     
  16. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    Yeah for sure, especially when they lend their names for main promotion and break their contract by reducing base price. Used and abused then insulted by the people...:p

    Just noticed the background promotional poster for their twitter site It has Susan Egelstaff a retired player from scotland:D:confused:
     
  17. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    First, I'd like to get the bad stuff up front and done with.

    The IBL organisers from the very beginning, have been dropping names of foreign players left, right and centre, giving the general impression that all these players have bought into the IBL concept etc. I distinctly remember even watching a few short clips of badly assembled videos in youtube -and the content was obviously plagiarised from other sources.

    Now that tells me that somewhere in all of this is not just a slightly unprofessional approach -they are clearly not averse to misrepresenting the facts if it suits their purpose. I don't think they can claim ignorance, because most of them come from a strong background of media, marketing and planning -so they must be aware of exactly what they are doing -and not doing.

    The auctions do not necessarily have to make sense to everyone. Just as long as it makes sense to the people who are doing the buying, it should be good enough. The notional value of certain players will be higher in certain parts of the world than others, regardless of their BWF seeding etc. I think if for example Gopi were to have made himself available as a player, he would have picked up the largest tab. But even some of his own students would be able to beat him comfortably.

    Most of the franchise owners have been associated in the past with the IPL so they know the ropes. If they haven't paid what many fans believe to be a "fair" amount for an international player, there could be commitment period issues, or other issues we don't know about. Even so, "injustice" may be done here or there. I'd be surprised to learn that any of the owners are really very au courant with the international badminton scene.

    Each "league" has one important sub-text, and that is to provide a chance at exposure and alternative livelihood to many of the talented but unsung players of the host country. The IBL is fulfilling this promise. That in itself is a huge step. Eventually that has a huge trickle-down effect for the entire badminton industry in a large market like India.

    Jwala needs to shut up and let her racquet do the talking. If it can anymore. She has become boring.

    Boe is just being Boe. There is no clear documentation of what transpired earlier between him and IBL, and just because he was excited about the whole thing and then dumped, he reacted as a Boe would react. Not all international players have statesman-like qualities, and he is of course entitled to his opinions. If he doesn't want to spend his tourist dollars in India, their economy will not slump either. Maybe the whole thing was an indication of his notional value to the IBL.

    Bottom line for me is, it apears that the organisers have magically made the whole thing a reality, albeit on the back of some ethically marginal/questionable moves earlier on. It promises a positive effect on the whole, for the sport. If they deliver the product.

    Among other questions would be:

    Are they going to pay the players up-front? Cautionary tale: I seem to recall the Bangladesh cricket league that started up as a me-too a couple of years ago, and there was this huge scandal about their not having paid the foreign players. It would be a disaster if such a thing were to happen at the IBL.

    Any hard data on broadcasting and relays? What about live streaming?
     
  18. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    This league has got bid from ESPN STAR Sports, Ten Sports and Sony Television. STAR Sports has bagged the broadcasting rights for the fortnight-long tournament

    http://articles.timesofindia.indiat...vp-ventures-indian-badminton-league-pvp-group

    Meanwhile, STAR Sports has bagged the broadcasting rights for the fortnight-long tournament and the players' auction will be held at the end of this month.
    "We initially got a bid of Rs 1.1 crore from Sony but later STAR came up with a better offer," the source said.
    Like in the IPL, there will be loads of glitz and glamour on each day. Several Bollywood stars have signed on the dotted line and would be performing at various venues.



    The signed amount kind of seems too low there...let us think Star sports offered 1.5 crore..It translates to $275K....That's too low no matter what, especially with IBL being sold at $1.5 billion for 10 years


    But this deal makes one thong clear..the deals going on are for year..so, I wonder if it becomes flop may be it will perish..
     
    #238 depleter, Jul 23, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
  19. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    Yeah..Lol ...and the common thing is that..Both leagues are run by Sporty Solutionz.
    For people who don't know..I remember reading that this league was actually completely run by sporty solutionz while BAI would only take some cash coming from it unlike IPL where everyhting is run by BCCI.
    Lol! but if we really see the franchise owners ...we have some big names there..like
    SAHARA, PVP (both had IPL touches)..Dabur ...Those are some pretty big time companies there...
     
  20. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    yeah looks like we are goona have matches on Youtube too..

    Found an article which says it..

    Can IBL do an IPL for badminton?


    New Delhi/Mumbai: Saina Nehwal sparked off a feisty bidding war, as was expected, at the player’s auction for the inaugural Indian Badminton League (IBL).
    The battle for the World No. 2 women’s singles player was won by the Hyderabad team that bought her for $120,000. The most expensive buy of the auction wasn’t Nehwal though—Malaysia’s Lee Chong Wei, the World No. 1 in men’s singles, and the biggest international name in the fray, was picked up by the Mumbai team for $135,000.
    The launch of the league, similar to the Indian Premier League(IPL) that has enriched cricketers and the country’s cricket board alike, may be good for the players, but its success isn’t guaranteed in a country where cricket gets the lion’s share of viewership as well as sponsorships and advertisements. This despite badminton being a popular game, and one invented in India.
    Nehwal and Wei were among the six players whose base price was fixed at $50,000. Germany’s Juliane Schenk got the highest bid among the rest of the six, and she was bought by Pune Pistons for $90,000 after the team won a bidding duel against Delhi Smashers.
    The six franchise teams—Hyderabad Hotshots, Lucknow Warriors, Pune Pistons, Mumbai Masters,Banga Beats (Bangalore) and Delhi Smashers—bought 10 players each and had a spending cap of $275,000. Each team features four foreign players, six Indian players, and one junior Indian player (the juniors were not up for auction). The 18-day tournament, which begins 14 August in New Delhi, will see singles and doubles matches played across the six cities, with the final in Mumbai. With a $1 million prize purse, organizers say that this is the world’s richest badminton tournament.
    “What was most impressive about the bidding was that you could see that each team came with a clear strategy,” said Pullela Gopichand, the Indian badminton team’s chief coach, and part of the governing body for IBL. “The teams knew exactly what they wanted, they had done their homework.”
    The players did not attend the auction but kept tabs on it through the Internet.
    “It was so exciting to see something like this happen with badminton,” said Guru Sai Dutt, world no. 55, who was bought by Lucknow for $40,000. “The prices were great, and the teams were well picked. We are all really excited about the tournament now—can’t wait for it to start.”
    To be sure, a successful auction is a big step forward for the fledgling league, but the real challenges begin now.
    “I’m not going to hide the fact that it was very difficult to get this off the ground,” said Ashish Chaddha, CEO of sports marketing and media rights company Sporty Solutionz, which is organizing the league. “For 12 months, we had a team of 40 people going from pillar to post to get these six teams going. We visited over 250 companies. But here’s the satisfying part—we’ve got three companies as team owners who’ve never invested in sports before.”
    The team owners form an eclectic group: some have a long history of investing in sports, like the Saharagroup, owner of the Lucknow Warriors, that has investments in everything from cricket to boxing. Dabur, owner of the Pune franchise, also owns a team in the Hockey India League. Delhi-based real estate company Krrish Group was founded in 2007, and is a first-time investor in sports. PVP Ventures, one of the biggest financers in the Indian film industry, has already shown its adventurous streak by producing a film last year with a revenge-seeking housefly as the protagonist. The film was a major hit.
    “We’ve been looking to invest in sport for some time now,” said Prasad V. Potluri, chairman and MD of PVP. “We bid for but could not get (the IPL team) Deccan Chargers last year. Then this came along, and we were convinced that there is huge potential in badminton and in this tournament with its eclectic mix of international stars and its crisp format.”
    The team owners are clear though that this is not just an adventure, and that they are looking at it as a business venture.
    “The potential for returns from this league is very good according to our calculations, and we think we can break even in three years,” said Kartikeya Rao, CEO, Krrish Delhi Smashers.
    Though the prices at which the teams were bought was not revealed, Sporty Solutionz said that the minimum price companies had to pay to own a team was [FONT=Utopia Std_Rupee]Rs.3.5 crore per year. Franchises will get 50% of the central sponsorship and the media rights money, and will have the right to sign on their own sponsors.[/FONT]
    “There are six sponsors on board for the league, but we cannot name them yet,” Chaddha said.
    The broadcast and digital rights have also been sold, and though the broadcaster has not been officially named, people familiar with the development said it is Star Sports, the channel owned by Rupert Murdoch’s Star India. A company spokesperson declined to comment. The broadcast deal includes distribution in 80 countries, as well as a tie-up with YouTube.
    Looking beyond cricket is still a risky business in India, where similar leagues for wrestling, volleyball, tennis, and motor sports were announced but did not take off. A boxing league, launched with plenty of media hype after the international success of Indian boxers at the 2008 Olympics, failed to make a mark. Only the Hockey India League, which held its first edition this year, managed to attract top business houses. Hero MotoCorp and Airtel are among the sponsors, and the Jaypee Group owns a team in the league.
    Like hockey, badminton has a unique association with India, and investors are banking on some of those sentiments.
    “This is a game that was invented in India,” founder and managing director of real estate company BOP Group Amit Mavi said. “It’s a game just about everyone in India has played at some time or the other. Both men and women play it, so it’s inclusive. And it’s a game where Indian players already have a good standing at the global level, and are sure to get better.” BOP owns the Bangalore franchise.
    Despite the positive outlook, generating viewership and attracting advertisers will still be a hurdle. “If you look at the Hockey India League, you will see that while the ratings of non-cricket events has been encouraging, they are still negligible when compared with cricket,” said a senior executive of a sports channel who did not want to be identified. “To my mind, the biggest challenge (facing this league) is going to be attracting sponsorships. The returns through advertising will be low, as ratings are low.”

    http://www.livemint.com/Industry/DF...000-for-Saina-Nehwal-for-badminton-leagu.html
     
    #240 depleter, Jul 23, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
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