Is Brave Sword 12 suitable for me?

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by jazzaddict, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. jazzaddict

    jazzaddict New Member

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    Greetings,

    I play doubles on a weekly basis, I go for drop shots, placements, and the occasional smash shots when the situation calls for it. I'm more of a defensive player, currently using Li-ning Windstorm 690. I love the light handling of this racquet but the racquet flex a little too much for my liking and power is lacking when delivering smash shots. It is stringed at 22lbs.

    Do you think brave sword 12 is suitable for me? and how much string tension and strings should I have it on? Thank you for your inputs![FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
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  2. Mr Norak

    Mr Norak Regular Member

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    I am a fan of the Bravesword 12 but I have a couple of questions for you. How do you know you don't like your current racquet because it is too flexible? Have you compared it with other racquets that are stiffer? From my understanding unless you are incredibly strong, a less flexible racquet will give you less power rather than more. I would be more inclined to increase your string tension a little bit more and perhaps refine your smash technique. But if you must buy the BS12 it is a good racquet :)
     
  3. jazzaddict

    jazzaddict New Member

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    Mr Norak,

    Thank you for the information and corrections, I am not quite familiar with badminton racquet technologies. I'll appreciate if anyone could explain in details on

    1. Shaft stiffness
    2. String tension
    4. String thickness
    3. Racquet balance

    How will does these factors support a player's style?

    I rang up Victor Taiwan yesterday afternoon and I was told the brave sword series are manufactured in China while the Meteors are Taiwanese made. This is kind of unexpected...it cost me USD$150 to have it imported from Taiwan. Not that it would make any differences, but one would expect flagship models to be Taiwanese made.
     
  4. moomoo

    moomoo Regular Member

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    Shaft stiffness: depends on your style of play, short swings usually use more flexible rackets unless you're super strong/fast that you can bend a stiff racket. beginners will get more power most of the time with a more flexible racket.

    String tension would affect your accuracy but will reduce the sweetspot of the racket bed. Again beginner's will benefit from a lower tension especially for back to back clears and smashes.

    String thickness is hard to explain the difference, mostly people associate durabilty (i use super thin 0.62 mm) but also affect the feedback/repulsion and whether you slice at all. Standard string tend to be the most repulsive ones like BG80, but pro's may prefer one thats more suitable to slice

    racket balance has the biggest difference in style, usually head heavy rackets are for attackers/singles player where defence is more based on footwork while a balanced and light head rackets are more suitable for technical/doubles players
     
  5. jazzaddict

    jazzaddict New Member

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    Sweet! Thank you for the detailed explanation! :)
     
  6. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    The BS12 is headlight, so it relies a lot on head speed to generate smash power. It's sort of stiff to mid-stiff, and feels like it carries most of it's weight in the T and the shaft, making it probably feel stiffer than it actually is. I couldn't get any power out of it because I don't have a particularly fast swing, and with such a light head if you don't have a fast swing, this is not the racket for you - unless you never do any power plays, which is unlikely.

    Ignore where rackets are made - it's largely meaningless. Companies don't go manufacture in China so they can let their QC slip, so you can be pretty confident all the recent Victors are great quality. The graphics on the Meteors however are maybe a smidge nicer, but even that's debatable.

    Also remember, higher tensions (higher than 24lbs) will only increase your power if you have the speed and strength to capitalise on it. If you don't, you'll actually get less power out of a given racket. If you find your abilities have outgrown 22lbs, then my all means try higher tensions. If your shots seem to have too much 'hold' or instability, then that's also a good reason to try a higher tension. If that seems like a half fix, then trying a stiffer racket would be your next option.
     
  7. Benwilluk

    Benwilluk Regular Member

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    Like Maklike I used the BS12 - loved the speed but did feel I compromised on power. I now play with an MX70 which is almost and quick and packs a punch. I also have an MX60 on the way to try out.
     
  8. moomoo

    moomoo Regular Member

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    ooo, make sure you review the mx60 as soon as you test it out k! thanks
     
  9. the_mentalist

    the_mentalist Regular Member

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    Sorry for out of the topic here..just curious..
    why some md players nowadays go for mid flex racket rather than stiff..
    isnt that will make they lose their power,accuracy etc..
    for example fu-cai pair from china or ko-yoo pair from korea..
     
  10. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

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    I myself wonder why but maybe because in doubles you can only afford the time to do short but strong swings so mid-stiff shafts kind of help the whipping actions, especially in mid-court drives? The world's top doubles should not have any problem w/ swing speed but yet they prefer medium to mid-stiff shafts, contrary to the sayings that u should use the stiffest shaft you can swing comfortably.

    Somehow i still don't fully understand the shaft flexibility theory. Any SIFU care to enlighten? :confused:
     
  11. jymbalaya

    jymbalaya Regular Member

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    not a sifu, but i have a guess.

    They choose rackets that aren't so difficult to use because they aren't difficult to use. They can max the potential easily, so they don't have to put as much work in. this helps then, because they can use a racket without putting too much strain on themselves, preventing injury. they also allows them staying power in a game, and has a lot of forgiveness when in a bad situation.

    For instance, many have noted that the N50 and F9 are both even balance rackets that aren't overly stiff. both are used by FHF. Many would assume that he would use an overly head heavy/overly stiff racket to generate the mot power. Most of the time though, he probably isnt in the most ideal position or something along those lines. a easier racket allows for him to smash is hardest a lot more of the time.

    as for the shaft flex understanding, look here.
     
  12. manutd92

    manutd92 Regular Member

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    bs 12 have a very fast swing.it takes time to adapt with it.but after u master the timing,it is one of the best racket!
    :D
     
  13. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

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    I already read that shaft flex but disagree on how one should choose shaft stiffness based on one's swing. I noticed that Gosen's Ryoga rackets comes in 3 versions, attacking-defensive-all around ..ie issen - tenbu - shiden. Defensive tenbu shaft stiffness is higher than the attacking issen. Why is control racket shaft stiffness is higher than attacking one? This goes against the principle of the sticky on shaft stiffness that says the faster you swing the stiffer you should choose. Any one care to explain?
     
  14. moomoo

    moomoo Regular Member

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    it all depends on you play style

    sticky (stiff) rackets are good for quick snap defence and more accurate for placement shots. you'd only play smashes when there is opportunity as its tiring to keep smashing especially if you play everyday.

    whippy (flexible) rackets are good since the shaft helps you a lot to smash and clear with less effort so your play style can be more aggresive.

    or course professional players are totally different, their muscles are conditioned everyday to use stiffer rackets.
     

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