is it air pressure that causes the shuttle to hang in the air longer in some halls?

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by ralphz, Oct 12, 2019.

  1. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    is it air pressure that causes the shuttle to hang in the air longer in some halls?

    And if so, then what is a good or proper air pressure for badminton?

    (talking about feather shuttles of course)
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Likely due to multiple layers of air with varying temperatures (thus varying densities). Instead of one single homogenous temperature.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
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  3. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Short answer is no.

    It's a combination of pressure and temperature which in turn informs the density of the air in the hall that makes shuttles faster/slower in different halls and locations.

    Different hall layouts in very similar locations also have different effects (drift/floating/hanging etc.) due to distribution of different densities of air (normally more driven by temperature than pressure at the same location since altitude is the main cause of pressure difference), reasons for variance in density would be mainly due to air conditioning settings and distribution (where exactly vents are positioned), occupancy of the hall (people generate heat), lighting layout (again, heat) and alll sorts of factors.

    The varying temperatures can lead to layering of air as @visor mentioned, where the shuttle can hang in the air as goes from hot to cold air. This gives the idea of 'slow' and 'fast' halls, even if the shuttle speed test leads to the same result.

    Proper temperatures are as marked on a speed chart such as: https://www.badmintonbay.com/Feather-Shuttlecock-Speed-Chart.html
     
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  4. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    if you were to drop a shuttle from X metres eg from a balcony at the top of a hall, is there a time it should take to drop?

    like a table relating height dropped from, with time taken to hit the floor?
     
  5. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Not officially. Perhaps there is research out there that has tried to determine such times.

    Main problem with a height based speed test would be that you need a relatively high location to drop a shuttle from, and given the shuttle is unlikely to reach it's terminal velocity unless you have a really high balcony, it's likely that the difference between two shuttle speeds will be in order of milliseconds rather than seconds, something quite hard to measure.

    The existing speed test works well enough for horizontal travel and is easy enough to conduct.

    If you had a vertical speed test as well, then at best you'll know where a hall is 'fast' or 'slow', but that's about it, since even if the result is different, the rules of badminton are based on horizontal travel and it would be near impossible to switch to vertical speed test in practice (especially for recreational players).

    In some ways it's like choosing to play badminton with a low ceiling or with a shortened court (I've seen this in small multipurpose sports halls). I'd MUCH rather play in a low ceiling hall than with a shortened court personally! There's just less of an influence is having a slightly lower ceiling (vertical speed considerations), than having the court shortened by 10-30cm (horizontal speed considerations)
     

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