Is this a good place for the net player? (See Video)

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Justin N., Jul 12, 2017.

  1. Justin N.

    Justin N. Regular Member

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    Check out this video of Chai Biao and Hong Wei. When they get into attacking position, however, I notice that the net player tends to rear up in the same box towards the back player instead of being all the way up at the service line. I notice this with a lot of professional men's doubles.

    Isn't this weird though? What happens if the opponent deflects the shuttle to the opposite cross court box, leaving both you and your partner stranded or literally diving for the shuttle? What are your thoughts on this?

    I'm searching for a good attacking strategy for doubles and this might be one of them. But I'm curious to hear advice first about effectively using it. Thanks in advance for your input!
     
  2. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    What do you mean by 'rear up'. Can you give some times in the video for examples?
     
  3. jkh1

    jkh1 New Member

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    It is unlikely that the opponent hit the shuttle cross court since technically it is easier to block or drive straight.
    Even if the opponent hits a cross court, it will likely not be so tight such that the the net player needs to stand so close to the service line.
     
  4. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    I guess what he means is that when attacking, the front court player doesn't stand too close to the net and instead moves further back, closer to his/her partner behind.

    OP, if I have understood you correctly, there are several reasons for this.

    1. By standing further back, you will have better sight of the court and your opponents.
    2. Have more time to react to fast defensive drives.
    3. You are covering the areas where the shuttle is more likely to be played and still be able to move forward quickly to attack the net.
    4. You can support your partner by being able to swap positions quicker.
    5. Can intercept lower/short lifts easier and buys your partner time to get into position.

    But be careful about doing this if your partner has a relatively weak attack or your opponents have a very strong defence where returns can be placed anywhere. So what you are describing tends to work well in advanced/pro level badminton but not as well at lower levels of play.
     
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  5. opikbidin

    opikbidin Regular Member

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    also be careful if your partner loves cross court smashes
     
  6. Daniel2207

    Daniel2207 Regular Member

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    Search to 6:30 in the video this is what can happen but if your partners smash is powerful enough shouldn't give them enough time to change the angle. Your partner always need to cover the straight block since it is more common also applies direct pressure on one individual player providing your partner doesn't change up the angle and smash cross this strategy will work however is you suspect that either your partner has a good cross court smash or the opponent can do a good cross court block then stand more in the middle. :)
     

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