Lee Chong Wei ( 李宗伟 )

Discussion in 'Malaysia Professional Players' started by tbleong, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Given the current context and the latest discussion on this topic, here is a classic match from 2006 to keep us entertained, the semi final of the AE 06 between LCW and LD before any Olympic medal... LD was still using the forehand serve!

     
  2. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    Lets pretend its a new movie.

    The doctor said he is good to go. All.clear. And his wife said take your gear and get that olympic gold that you deserved.

    Deng.. deng... deng... ;)
     
  3. lodoss

    lodoss Regular Member

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    a fanmade documentary on LCW.

    part 1/2


    part 2/2
     
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  4. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Lin Dan v Chong Wei: How badminton's great rivalry was born
    By AFP - May 19, 2020 @ 5:28pm
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    Fifteen years ago in a packed Kuala Lumpur stadium, rising stars Lin Dan and Lee Chong Wei met in a final for the first time, setting the stage for what would become badminton's greatest rivalry. – AFP pic
    KUALA LUMPUR: Fifteen years ago in a packed Kuala Lumpur stadium, rising stars Lin Dan and Lee Chong Wei met in a final for the first time, setting the stage for what would become badminton's greatest rivalry.

    Malaysia's Lee, then 22, fell to the floor, punched the air and blew kisses to the crowd after his see-sawing, 88-minute 17-15, 9-15, 15-9 victory, when he fought back from behind in the first and last games.

    "Everyone saw how (Lin) played," said Lee, who was the defending champion, after his win at the Kuala Lumpur Badminton Stadium.

    "He is excellent in attack and his overhead smashes and forehand crosscourt shots are dangerous. So it is very satisfying to beat him."

    It was a fittingly tense start for a match-up that would span two Olympic finals and two world championship deciders, and drew a new generation of fans.

    But the match would remain one of the high points for Lee, who lost his four world and Olympic finals against the Chinese great and retired last year without winning either of the sport's top two titles.

    "Their rivalry happened in a period when badminton needed inspiration," K.M. Boopathy, a veteran Malaysian sports journalist who watched the 2005 game, told AFP.

    "They managed to make the sport extremely popular."

    Lee, now 37, and Lin, 36, played 40 times in total, with the Chinese player convincingly winning their head-to-head 28-12.

    Lee had lost his first and only encounter against Lin before beating him in the Kuala Lumpur final.

    The 2008 and 2012 Olympic title matches were among the most memorable showdowns between the men, who both enjoyed long spells as world number one.

    Lin won in straight games in Beijing in 2008, but Lee came agonisingly close to gold at London 2012, leading 19-18 in the deciding game before fatefully leaving a shot that dropped on the line.

    Bracketing the 2012 defeat, Lee lost world title matches to Lin in 2011 and then in 2013 in southern China, when the air conditioning mysteriously failed mid-match and the Malaysian was stretchered off with cramp as he faced match point.

    Fiery Lin and soft-spoken Lee are very different characters, although they were friends off the court and share a strong mutual respect.

    Known as "Super Dan", Lin had a reputation as badminton's bad boy -- he sported multiple tattoos, unusually for a Chinese player, and strutted around the court with supreme confidence.

    The two-time Olympic and five-time world champion, often regarded as the best badminton player ever, often ran into controversy. In 2008, he threw a temper tantrum during a training session after which he had to deny striking his coach.

    In contrast, Lee was quiet and unassuming. But his humble demeanour belied a dazzling array of weapons on the court -- he was blessed with lightning reflexes and once held the record for the world's fastest smash.

    His 19-year career also had its fair share of drama, however.

    The then world number one was banned after testing positive for a proscribed anti-inflammatory at the 2014 world championships, and was sidelined for eight months until authorities eventually accepted his explanation he took it inadvertently.

    Lee launched a comeback and defeated Lin in a thrilling semi-final at the 2016 Rio Olympics -- only to lose once again in the final, this time to another Chinese player, Chen Long.

    The sinewy star longed for a final shot at Olympic gold at the Tokyo Games, now postponed due to the coronavirus, but his hopes were dashed after being diagnosed with nose cancer in 2018.

    He recovered after treatment but struggled to regain his form, and announced his retirement last year at a tearful press conference.

    With 705 wins and 69 titles, Lee is a national hero in Malaysia, which has produced few world-class athletes.

    The pair's final match was the quarter-finals of the prestigious All-England Open in March 2018, which the Chinese won.

    But Lin has not hit his former heights in recent years, and with retirement looming he looked certain to miss the Tokyo Olympics before they were postponed to next year.

    When Lee announced his retirement, Lin posted on China's Twitter-like Weibo: "I will be alone on the (badminton) court and no one will accompany me."

    And only last month, Lee described his nemesis, who is still playing, as a "legend".

    "His titles speak for themselves. We have to salute him," he said. -- AFP

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    If we all here in BC want to discuss the topic about Dato' LCW vs LD aka Superdan, i will guarantee that even after all the movies under MCU next phases has finished, the entire earth population has already been fully vaccinated for Covid 19 and Comet Halley has passed earth in 2061, the discussion about this two titan will still not end.

    When badminton has entered the modern era of 20th century, both of them has single handedly dictate and change how we treat badminton in every aspect of our life during those days. In every clash they had, I've bought a new sofa, bought a new TV,...(and the list goes on) .... just for the sake of wanted to see them both beating each other in the most glorious atmosphere possible.

    I dare to say it's likely that there will be no repeat stories that can surpass the epic scale of rivalry history like this two titan in the near future.
     
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  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Lee Chong Wei, one in a million
    Published on: Saturday, June 15, 2019
    By: Bernama

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    Kuala Lumpur: Allahyarham Tan Sri P.Ramlee’s much-loved classic tune ‘Di Mana Kan Ku Cari Ganti’ best describes the huge gap left by national badminton icon Datuk Lee Chong Wei following his announcement Thursday to retire from the game.


    When it comes to this former world No.1, many would agree that Chong Wei, where Malaysian sports is concerned, is truly one in a million.

    Whether it was his personality, his characteristics or commitment to badminton, is it clear there is nothing but great admiration for what this 37-year-old has done for the country throughout his 19-year career as the nation’s singles shuttler.

    Those who had watched his biopic ‘Lee Chong Wei: Rise of the Legend’, would attest to this, as the film depicts the three-time Olympic silver medallist’s journey on badminton’s international stage.

    The Penang-born player hung up his racket for good Thursday, with 69 titles, including 47 from the Superseries circuit, earning him the right to be called the ‘King of the Superseries’.

    Chong Wei won the Malaysian Open 12 times in his career (2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018), besides emerging as the first non-local player to win the Indonesian Open six times (2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2016).

    He also won the Japan Open five times (2007, 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014) and participated in eight editions of the Thomas Cup after making his debut in 2004.

    The former world No. 1 (August 21, 2008 to June 14, 2012) won the prestigious All England title four times in his career - 2010, 2011, 2014 and 2017, and was runners-up in three World Championships (2011, 2013 and 2015).

    There were testing times throughout his 19-year-career, including a doping issue in 2014 and a serious shoulder injury in the 2012 All England final that forced him to retire from the match.

    National Sports Council (NSC) director-general, Datuk Ahmad Shapawi Ismail said Chong Wei will be missed, especially because he remained a humble sportsman despite going on to become a household name in world badminton.

    “He never was the type of athlete that troubled us, if he wanted anything, he would ask in the most pleasant way. My message to existing and young athletes is this – emulate his characteristics and traits,” he said.

    National women’s singles coach, Datuk Tey Seu Bock, meanwhile, said Chong’s Wei characteristics was hard to be found on any of the current generation of players.

    “Of course, every player has their own (characteristics), but I feel we will have to wait for a few more generations (of players) before we find another like him. As a coach, I haven’t seen any yet,” Tey, who was among those who were instrumental in ensuring Chong Wei’s path to three Olympic Games finals.

    On Chong Wei’s decision to retire, Tey said, on a personal note, he was happy with it, as besides turning 37 in October, it was decision based on serious health matters.

    Tey said Chong Wei’s decision would now lift a lot of the ‘weight’ he had shouldered during his playing years.

    “I am happy with his decision as there is no more burden for him. Not many know this, Chong Wei is a very committed player and never took his training sessions or tournaments lightly. He is not one that quits easily,” he said.

    Meanwhile, Indonesian badminton legend, Hariyanto Arbi was quoted in antaranews.com as saying that Chong Wei was a fighter on the court and one who displays an extraordinary level of commitment to the game.

    He described Chong Wei as a kind hearted athlete who always respects his opponent.

    “He is a good-hearted person, loyal, humble and always respects the athletes whom he meets. Always treating everyone the same,” he was quoted as saying.

    Meanwhile, the Sportswriters Association of Malaysia (SAM), in a statement, said members of the media had never once complained about Chong Wei.

    “SAM has never received any complaints or hear any grouses of negative treatment from this player regardless of what the situation was, including during his (match) defeats. Datuk Lee Chong Wei has never disappointed sports journalists,” SAM president Jasni Shafie said.

    This outstanding athlete has left an outstanding legacy in Malaysian sporting history and the time has finally come for his long awaited and well-deserved rest after an illustrious 19-year career.

    Thank you, Datuk Lee Chong Wei and happy retirement Datuk! – Bernama
     
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  6. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Zii Jia’s pair of aces
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    The successor: Lee Chong Wei (right) feels Lee Zii Jia can fight for a medal in Tokyo.

    PETALING JAYA: The partnership of two coaches – Hendrawan and Datuk Tey Seu Bock – worked wonders for Datuk Lee Chong Wei at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games as he went on to win his third silver medal.

    His anointed successor Lee Zii Jia could also benefit from the same combination as he bids to win a medal at the Tokyo Olympics next year.

    Seu Bock was named as assistant to men’s singles head coach Hendrawan in the recent coaching set-up shake-up. Before the change, he had been the women’s singles head coach since 2018.


    Chong Wei was optimistic about the coaching changes.

    “Hendrawan and Seu Bock were my coaches leading up to Rio before the latter was moved to another department. Some players prefer one coach, some prefer two but for me, their combination worked well, ” he said.

    “I hope it will work for Zii Jia too. I hope the coaches will turn Zii Jia into a medal winner at the Tokyo Games.

    “But to Zii Jia and the coaches, no pressure from me!” said Chong Wei, who will be the chef de mission to Tokyo.

    Chong Wei, who also emerged as the runners-up at the 2008 Beijing and 2012 London Olympics editions, said Hendrawan and Seu Bock were unique.

    The Indonesian made a name for himself as a player by winning silver at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, the world title in Seville in 2001, and taking home the Thomas Cup three times in 1998,2000 and 2002 before turning coach.

    Seu Bock may not have achieved the same accolades as Hendrawan as a player, but as a coach, he worked as an assistant to several of Malaysia’s head coaches – Li Mao (China), Indra Gunawan (Indonesia), Datuk Misbun Sidek and Rashid Sidek.

    “They are different but are equally good. Hendrawan was successful as a player and was able to translate all his experiences on the court as a coach. His skill work is good, ” said Chong Wei.

    “Seu Bock has worked under so many coaches and he puts all of that together. He is a man full of ideas.

    “Together, they are able to complement one another. Zii Jia and the other youngsters will surely benefit from them.”

    Chong Wei, however, reminded Zii Jia and the other players not to be overly dependent on the coaches.

    “The coaches do make a difference but the players hold a bigger responsibility, ” he said.

    “The coaches may contribute 15% to the success of a player but the remaining 85% is based on the players’ own initiative, commitment and discipline, ” said the former national No. 1.

    Chong Wei should know. After all, he was dominant for more than decade as Malaysia’s most successful player despite the ups and downs before finally retiring last year due to nose cancer.

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    15% from coaches, 85% from player...that's what Datuk LCW said. If Zii Jia want to better Datuk LCW achievement in Rio then he must put more works into himself above 85%.
     
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  7. Nine Tailed Fox

    Nine Tailed Fox Regular Member

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    If Datuk was himself healthy, he would have bagged himself a Bronze medal at Tokyo 2020/2021/2022.

    Only current Momota and Chen Long are better than Datuk.
     
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  8. Kikuhito Senshi

    Kikuhito Senshi Regular Member

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    Momota is a bit of an unknown at the moment. We haven’t seen him play since the accident.
     
  9. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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