Lightweight racket for beginners

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by Izzat Ismail, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. Izzat Ismail

    Izzat Ismail New Member

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    Hi i'm only starting to play badminton and i'm using a friend's carbonex 21 sp. The racket felt so heavy for me. I had difficulty making backhand clears and even forehand clears sometimes. I want to ask for suggestions on cheap, lightweight racket with a heavy head, because i read that it'll help with power. My budget is very limited. Currently considering nanoray 11i and maxbolt nezer x19. Please help thank you
     
  2. pughon

    pughon Regular Member

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    There is a wide range of low level racket out there and no one can be sure which racket available in your region.

    The principle is simple: 4U/3U racket, flexible/medium.
     
  3. laistrogian

    laistrogian Regular Member

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    I'd look for Hart or Apacs racket, just look for 3U even balanced with medium flex
     
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  4. Izzat Ismail

    Izzat Ismail New Member

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    Would 5u or above be too light?
     
  5. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    4U head heavy Or 3U balance
    The reason for you to get used to heaviness of the racket & train your arm. 3U head heavy might just to much & 4U balancr would makes your arm to lazy.

    Medium flex (3/5), any brand.
    As you are beginner, mid flex would help you in power department & also other brand would offer you much cheaper for better quality racket. Afterall if you really serious in badminton, you would learn technique, find you style, & in the end you would want a racket that suit your style which mean you would be buying few other racket to experiment in the future.
     
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  6. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    85gr is not an extreme weight for regular person to lift an object & swing it. Which is why i suggest 3U balance or 4U head heavy to train your arm to get used to it. Unless ofcourse you had some sort of problem like injury or something, which mean using less burdening racket like 5U or 6U would be good for your health.

    Even tho when you progress alot, found your style & prefer 5U head light racket, its still good for your early day training your arm with heavier one.
     
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  7. BalajiSethuraman

    BalajiSethuraman Regular Member

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    I would suggest you to use a training racket aka heavier rackets if ur fairly a beginner. Unless u are proper with technique of playing badminton u can’t learn.

    Pls learn to play proper shots with heavier rackets and then use ur budget to buy a carbon graphite rackets. Infact once u have learnt the technique any carbon graphite racket is going to be easy for u.

    Badminton is a highly strenuous sport and if u learn to play the shots in wrong way then ur sooner to get all injuries. So I reckon buy something heavier or continue to play with ur friends racket as long as he can lend it to u


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  8. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    as he just start to play badminton & he also say felt strugling on his friend 3U racket, going for training racket which is heavier could risk him for injury.

    I agree that training racket would benefit us in our training. Even im starting my 1st badminton experience using very old legacy Yonex racket, an all steel & visible T joint that connect the shaft end to the bottom frame. But my background is a very active kids that love to do alot of sport activity like football, basketball, or just running around crazily. So basically im healthy kids with strong physical form so that im able to handle U racket without any harm. Idk about his background, so going for a big jump would risk him to get more harm than goods.
     
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  9. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    Really, a 120g + training racket is not a good idea, ever. Why even suggest this? They are specifically for niche training and not intended to be the only racket you use.

    Back to the original question...(all from Apacs) Wave 10, Ferocious 22 (quite whippy) or Blend Duo 88 (too light? but a fine racket) should be pretty cheap and suit your wishes.
     
  10. BalajiSethuraman

    BalajiSethuraman Regular Member

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    Ok there is absolutely a great misunderstanding. I meant training racket to train first.. but still I recommend to play with a heavy racket perhaps a U or 2U..

    I still recommend to have a proper training if he is starting to learn badminton.

    And anything other than yonex or lining I would recommend cos the fresh mind need to accept that a drop is a drop and a smash is a smash. It really doesn’t depends on racket but with technique. Almost 80 to 90 percentage rookies go straight to yonex or lining. I have seen lot of fresh badminton player buy expensive rackets yet they have no idea how to play a proper clear shot!!! The worst part is they play doubles and breaks partners racket along with theirs..


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  11. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    OK it was a misunderstanding. Only a vindictive person would suggest a 120g racket :cool:

    There is no evidence to suggest 1U or 2U rackets are best for beginners. They are just an option based on personal preference. The best place for a beginner to start is well away from the extreme ends of the racket spectrum. As time has moved on the racket choices are shifting away from 1U (70s) to 2U (80s) to 3U (90s) and decades of fine tuning around 4U and 3U to date. The game is different to the game played in the 80s/90s when the Cab 21 first came out. Learning with an old racket will just make the transition to a modern racket another hurdle and there is little to be learned using a Cab 21 that you can't learn with a modern racket.
     
  12. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    The basic principle is all the same for all activity. To improve you would want to stress/burden/torture yourself more or can be said going out from your comfort zone.
    Step by step increasing the stress would resulting an improvement of yourself. Going for an extreme jump, tho the result would be better & faster for our improvement, it has a risk that if your mind/body fail to hold the stress level, it would resulting an injury. Kinda high risk high gain, an all out approach, takes all or nothing.
    So going for training racket is good, but not now for sure. Later when he had some technique & he want to strengthen his arm, then looking for heavier one is good but again step by step.
     
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  13. BalajiSethuraman

    BalajiSethuraman Regular Member

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    Nothing much to be said.. perceptions differs. What I said were just 2 cents from my side. I don’t recommend a rookie playing badminton without a proper training on shots. Once he/she develop some shot making technique then changing the racket is a good way to play badminton.

    I meant the training racket to make sure the arm and wrist memory is gained thereby going to a carbon graphite racket would be a easier choice. Nevertheless it up to the person’s choice to decide to play badminton.. learn the proper way for 6 months and play a decent, injury free, good game lifelong or do a jump start with lighter rackets and do hanky panky stuff.. it up to the individuals choice.

    Let me stop here!!! Thanks all


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  14. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    Before more misinformation and confusion spills out, "training racket" is a specific term given to a range of rackets that are intentionally much heavier than normal. Yonex and Apacs make them. Apacs have 3 with different weight categories, 120g, 140g and 160g. These are not to be used as the only racket, they are supposed to support specific training exercises such as developing explosive acceleration and faster racket speed. This type of training should be controlled and is for more advanced players, not beginners.
     
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  15. Izzat Ismail

    Izzat Ismail New Member

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    I opted for apacs sensuous 10, it's 4u medium flex and even balanced. Costs around 20usd. But i'll still be holding onto my friend's carbonex and i'll use it when i feel like im ready lol. Anyways thanks for the help, greatly appreciated
     

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