New Website

Discussion in 'Thomas Laybourn Forum' started by Laybourn, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    This is exactly the sort of thoughtless attitude that causes problems for people with disabilities :rolleyes:

    Able-bodied people often have little understanding of what a disabled person can do, or what a disabled person is interested in.

    You are assuming that blind people are not interested in supporting a sports team or individual. Why should this be so? Granted, they can't watch the game; but many sports fans listen on the radio.

    Besides, the same problems that blind people experience from bad website design also affect partially sighted people, or people who just like to read text at a more comfortable size.

    Finally, you should think about this: the most powerful user of the internet is blind. He decides whether a website will be popular. And his name?

    His name is Google. And if he can't read your website, no-one else will find it.
     
  2. kittan

    kittan Regular Member

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    I made an assumption based on television but i never thought about radio.

    Sorry if what i said came accross as thoughtless. I just dont have much experience with blind people in my country, although i understand other physical disabilities as i give up time to work at a handicapped house.

    Once again, sorry for my thoughtless attitude
     
  3. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Hey, maybe "thoughtless" was a bit harsh :)

    Besides, there are so many different disabling conditions -- so much variety of people -- that no-one can be expected to think of every possibility.

    On the positive side, as a web developer you don't have to think of every possibility. Web accessibility guidelines are published by the W3C:

    http://www.w3.org/TR/WAI-WEBCONTENT/

    The guidelines aren't perfect, but they help a lot :) Web developers would do well to follow them unless they have a compelling reason not to.

    In this case, Thomas's site violates the very first guideline:

    Specifically, Checkpoint 1.1 says:

    This is a "priority 1" checkpoint, which means:

     
  4. nordjohn

    nordjohn New Member

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