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opponent hitting your racket question

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by Birdy, Aug 16, 2008.

  1. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    If your opponent hits your racket during a net play or net kill, because you have your racket right in front or even over the net, and the birdy goes out is it considered the opponents' point?

    Thank you!
     
  2. RHui_BC

    RHui_BC Regular Member

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    It is allowed for your opponents racquet to cross the net only on a follow through I believe.

    Now the questions is, did the bird hit yer racquet and change direction? If it did, it is their point.

    If your racquet intentionally blocked his racquets path, I believe it is his point as well.

    If it was a clean birdy hit and the bird went out, but his racquet still somehow hit yours, it is your point.

    If unsure, reserve :/
     
  3. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    No, the birdy didn't hit my racket. Hmm. It hit my racket, because i net drop and it was too high, and I knew that they were gonna net kill, so i put my racket in front of the net trying to block the path of the bird.
     
  4. Juniorguy

    Juniorguy Regular Member

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    Having your racket over the net is already considered a fault. If you leave your racket up before the net and the opponent hits your racket its considered a fault for them because they're racket went over the net and hit yours which wasn't over the net.
     
  5. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    Are you sure? Cuz I done it a couple times to different opponents, and the opponents alway gave me the point. It might not be because they don't know the rules, but clarify me if I'm wrong.
     
  6. Erik L.

    Erik L. Regular Member

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    A player's racket can only be across the net in a natural follow through during the excecution of a legal shot. In any other case having your racket across the net is a fault. When your oppent hits your racket in the excecution of his shot, the fault is yours because you interfere with his follow through. Where the shuttle goes is not relevant in this case.
     
  7. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    Oh. But can you have your racket in front of the net. Of course not over it. And they still hit your racket. would it be your lost of point? Thanks.
     
  8. RHui_BC

    RHui_BC Regular Member

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    I think in that case you would look at the bird.
     
  9. Heong

    Heong Regular Member

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    Just note that:

    1. You cannot touch the net at all until the shuttle has touched the ground.
    2. Your racquet cannot go over/under the net.

    If your opponent's racquet was over the net at the time & the shuttle touches the racquet then it is a fault & your opponent loses the point..
     
  10. katarina

    katarina New Member

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    Official rules:

    It shall be a ‘fault’:
    13.4. if, in play, a player:
    13.4.2. invades an opponent’s court over the net with racket or person except that the striker
    may follow the shuttle over the net with the racket in the course of a stroke after the
    initial point of contact with the shuttle is on the striker’s side of the net;
    or
    13.4.4. obstructs an opponent, i.e. prevents an opponent from making a legal stroke where the
    shuttle is followed over the net;
     
  11. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    Hi Katarina, I really appreciate you looking this up, but if someone can simplify what it means that ll be helpful :)
     
  12. katarina

    katarina New Member

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    no problem :)
    if the initial contact of your opponent with the shuttle is on his side of the net he can follow with the racket over the net, and if he than touches your racket(without touching the net) it's your fault because you didn't allow him to continue with his shot (no matter that you are on your side of the net)
     
  13. Erik L.

    Erik L. Regular Member

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    1. Katarina is right.

    2. Heong's interpretation of what a player is or is not allowed to do with his racket does not quite cover the matter.
    As RHui BC and katarina already pointed out you are indeed allowed to follow the shuttle over the net with your racket in the course of a stroke and more than that, it is also allowed to cross the net with your racket from below the net with the restriction however that this may not obstruct or distract your opponent. You can get this situation with a late return of a close net shot.
    It is also not quite the case that you cannot touch the net before the shuttle is on the ground. The rule in this case is that before you can touch the net without consequence, play has to be dead and that does not necessarily mean that the shutte has to be on the ground.
     
    #13 Erik L., Aug 17, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2008
  14. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    Thank you for the response ! So in other words, it's already a fault that I have my racket in front of the net (not over on opponent's side), because I am "distracting or obstructing the shot of my opponents" ? Thanks in advance.
     
  15. Erik L.

    Erik L. Regular Member

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    Hohoho Birdy, not so quick. Having your racket in front of the net does not as a rule automatically constitute obstruction. It will be the umpire's judgement call whether it is obstruction or not. It will only be ruled as obstruction when it is the umpire's judgment that the position of your racket interferes with the competion of your opponten's stroke and thast is certainly not always the case.
     
  16. lorus_blue

    lorus_blue Regular Member

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    erik l. is right! what if you were fast enough to counter the follow-through shot of your opponent and your racket is nowhere near the net nor is it in a blocking position for your opponent's racket, and still your rackets clashed when you did your super-duper-fast counter shot, i think it's still your opponent's fault!
     

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