P. V. Sindhu पुसर्ला वेन्कटा सिन्धु

Discussion in 'India Professional Players' started by cobalt, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    Link 3: https://www.thehindu.com/sport/pv-s...erfect-game/article29255526.ece?homepage=true


    Link 4: https://telanganatoday.com/i-had-tears-when-the-national-anthem-was-played

    ‘I had tears when the national anthem was played’
    Speaking to N Jagannath Das from Basel, Sindhu said: “I’m a proud Indian. This gold means a lot for me."
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    By AuthorN Jagannath Das | Published: 26th Aug 2019 12:56 am
    [​IMG]
    PV Sindhu after a training session at the Suchitra Badminton Academy.


    Sindhu said: “I’m a proud Indian. This gold means a lot for me. It also brought tears when the national anthem was being played. It is a special moment for me, especially standing on the podium and your flag flying high. It feels great to be an Indian. Winning the World title is not a small thing. So I’m thrilled.”

    On finally beating the jinx
    It is definitely a very big win. It was a much awaited gold medal as I have been waiting for this to happen for long because last two World Championship finals, I got silver and today I won the gold. It is a happy moment.
    On the 2017 final
    I never thought of the 2017 final as I focused on this match. I thought I would treat it like as one of the matches so that I would not invite any type of pressure. I thought I would play my normal game and give my best.

    On Sunday final and her confidence
    The confidence was there as I knew I would play my best badminton. I was well prepared. A lot of planning and hard work went into my preparation. I wanted to win this medal desperately and I earned it in a hard way. I trained very hard for this and got the gold. I was happy with the way I played my attacking game. From the first point, I was dominating and leading. Even though I was leading 17-6 in second game, I said I was not done yet as I had to complete the match. I was going one point at a time. Finally, when it got over, okay I said it is over. I was calm and I did not even shout. It was a different and special moment for me. I have done it after the last point and I had tears in my eyes. Finally, after four attempts (including Rio Olympics), I could do it.

    On her rigorous training
    I trained more than eight hours. My fitness sessions were in Suchitra Academy as my trainer Srikanth is from that academy. On court I trained under Gopi sir and Korean coach Kim.

    On the new Korean coach Kim Ji Hyun
    Kim has been here for a couple of months and every coach has a different mindset. She had a different thinking and she utilised that to the maximum. She would tell me about my mistakes and taught me a few of new skills.

    On her father PV Ramana’s role
    My father has been a huge inspiration. He always liked my aggression in the game. He was an aggressive player in volleyball. May be that helped me to play an attacking game.

    On the preparation
    I’m not special or lucky. It is a combination of hard work, dedication, sacrifice and luck that played a huge role in my win today. Everybody had a role in my success.

    On her birthday gift to her mother Vijaya
    She is over the moon. She is so happy. She was very emotional and had tears in her eyes.
     
  2. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    I read another translated article by the same N Jagannath.

    Apparently Pradeep Raju played a big role in Sindhu's success.
    In addition to training under Gopichand and Kim Ji Hyun, she also did extra training sessions under Pradeep Raju(Suchitra Academy).

    P.Raju's main point was that Sindhu is naturally attacking, but the attack has to be more controlled .
    And that requires extra training for physical fitness and recovery. So he suggested chinese cupping therapy with ice-baths for Sindhu.
    And that has made Sindhu much fitter because she is able to recover much faster.


    It seems coach Kim mostly looked after her net play and deception. And that has improved.
    Gopichand, of course, is her long term coach and has also been training her.

    Apparently, Sindhu was quite confident even before the world championships. She could sense improvement in both fitness and gameplay. Privately she had been making statements like "It's time to change the colour of the world championship medal."
     
  3. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    Anyway, Congratulations to Sindhu for winning the World Championship!

    First WT Finals champion.
    Now World Championship winner.

    You are doing great!
     
  4. Justin L

    Justin L Regular Member

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    Sindhu played her best badminton ever at Basel , a most worthy World Champion. Congratulations, and keep it up.
     
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  5. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    PV Sindhu

     
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  6. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    Link 5: https://scroll.in/field/935124/guts...ph-was-inevitable-because-she-willed-it-to-be

    Guts, glory, gold: PV Sindhu’s World C’ships triumph was inevitable, because she willed it to be
    After an extraordinary display of power and dominance, Sindhu’s immediate celebrations were decidedly ordinary.

    [​IMG]
    PV Sindhu, World Champion | AFP
    Vinayakk Mohanarangan

    Starting from 5.30 pm IST on Sunday, for the next 38 minutes, we witnessed extraordinary scenes in Basel at the 25th edition of the BWF Badminton World Championships.

    Extraordinary, because PV Sindhu made Nozomi Okuhara look like a rookie. Extraordinary, because PV Sindhu dropped just 14 points in the entire final against a former World Champion. Extraordinary, because Rio Olympic silver medallist PV Sindhu became World Champion PV Sindhu.

    But the moment Okuhara made one final error, Sindhu just held her arms against her face for a few seconds and went about hugging her coaches, thanking the referees and shaking hands with her fierce rival — all with a smile on her face and nothing much else. She thanked her coaches, the fans and dedicated the gold to her mother who was celebrating her birthday. You know how they say in sport that the scoreline sometimes does not tell you the full story of a match? This was not one of those occasions. Sindhu had just blown Okuhara away.

    After an extraordinary display of power and dominance, however, Sindhu’s immediate celebrations were decidedly ordinary.

    Perhaps the nature of the win made the crowning moment a bit anti-climactic. Perhaps she was not sure of what she had managed to achieve, just yet. Perhaps the feelings were just sinking.

    Or perhaps she was steeled by emotions from the other end of the spectrum for the last couple of years.

    Only Sindhu can answer that, as to what was going through her mind at those historic moments.

    The moment she stood in silence, facing the tri-colour and listening to Jana Gana Mana being played at St. Jakobshalle Arena, the tears started rolling out. The realisation that she was the first ever Indian to be the best badminton player in the world hit her and she could not hold it back.
    It was six years after she stood on the podium wearing bronze as a teenager in Guangzhou.
    It was three years after she stood on the podium wearing silver as a 21-year-old in Rio.
    It was two years after she just about managed to pick herself up in the aftermath of an 110-minute epic in Glasgow that did not deserve a loser.
    It was a year after she was second best by a distance against a rampant Carolina Marin.
    And here she was, on August 25, 2019, standing tall at the top of the podium.

    This did not just happen, by chance.
    There is nothing happenstance about Sindhu’s meteoric rise since that night in Guangzhou. It is the result of hours of hard work. It is the result of shedding her shy nature and transforming herself into a roaring machine on a badminton court, borne out of time spent just practising yelling because her coach wanted her to get those emotions out of her.

    It is the result of being young and brave. It is the result of having conviction in her methods, while at the same time being open to making tweaks to her game that help her improve. It is the result of trying hard, failing, trying hard again, failing better... and then triumphing at the end. It is the result of being at peace with the mighty expectations from her.

    “Of course responsibilities are always there especially after Rio, like every time you go out on the court you have to win gold,” Sindhu told reporters after her win. “After a few months, after a year.. I thought, what should I do for it? When you think about others, and trying to win it for them... back then, I thought, I have to play for myself, give my best.”

    The thing about being an athlete, and especially one as special as Sindhu, is that the expectations won’t ever decrease. The more they win, the more they will be expected to repeat that feat. The more they don’t meet those lofty expectations, the more they will be questioned.

    Believe it or not, she was actually asked if she thought her path to the gold medal was “made easy” this time because there was no Carolina Marin in the fray and No 1 seed Akane Yamaguchi was knocked out earlier. This, after she defeated the recent world No 1 and, arguably the best player of this era, Tai Tzu Ying in the quarter-final. This, after dismantling the form player of 2019 without a doubt, Chen Yufei, in the semi-final. This, after registering a scarcely believable scoreline in the final against 2017 world champion Okuhara in the final.

    But you know what, Sindhu will not care. She ripped to shreds all the questions over her winning mentality. She is the gold medallist on merit. She is the World Champion. She, not for the first time in her career, went where no other Indian shuttler has gone before.

    It was inevitable, because she willed it to be.

    And she did it her way. She did it for herself.

     
  7. Biglever

    Biglever Regular Member

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    What a shame! Look at Indonesian MD players, they all train together. And also look at Japanese badminton players. Momota trains with Nishimoto and Yamaguchi trains with Okuhara. And all the doubles players train together. It doesn't matter whether you lose to your country man/woman as long you give everything for your country. Pathetic to see the scenario here.

    Play hard. Train harder.
     
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  8. samkool

    samkool Regular Member

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    athletes in individual sports have to do what's best for themselves. it's a selfish vocation by nature. not everyone benefits from the same structure, and not all structures are equal. india's system is nowhere near indonesia's, japan's and china's yet. it's under funded, under manned and disorganized at this point.

    the success of the individual still gives glory to the nation. if saina & pvs are forced to train in conditions they don't like their successes may never happen, thereby bringing no glory to india. as you can see now their individual choices have paid off, and the nation of india still gets to enjoy their victories.

    i'm curious how long it will take india to build its infrastructure to the level of the other asian badminton powers. as they build it out i hope they follow the japan model which avoids 99% of the self-interest politicking of rich and/or power hungry coaches and executives.
     
  9. Baddie lover

    Baddie lover Regular Member

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    Couldn't have said better.
     
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  10. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    So if not miss Kim, then who exactly is coaching Saina?
    Does Gopichand coach Saina?

    I only read that she went against her doctor's advice and took injections to play in the WC.
     
  11. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    Yes, Gopichand coaches Saina. She needs something different as she has learnt everything from him already. Gopichand now gets time to spend with the upcoming players as the Korean/Indian coaches have reduced his load.
     
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  12. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    PV Sindhu arrives in India




     
    #772 badmuse, Aug 26, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2019
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  13. Baddie lover

    Baddie lover Regular Member

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    Good to see Indian threads active again.
     
  14. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    I agree.
    Aren't there any other coaches in Gopichand Academy?
    If not- why doesn't miss Kim train Saina too?
     
  15. terrynguyen121988

    terrynguyen121988 Regular Member

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    Sindhu won gold medal, I think this is more than a gold medal. The media and the India badminton and ad contracts and of course, a sporting history book and maybe a movie in the future ... It looks like Sindhu will get much more than a gold medal.

    p/s: Sindhu topic was active again.... I'am still waiting for Nishimoto topic active once ^-^
     
    #775 terrynguyen121988, Aug 27, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2019
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  16. badmuse

    badmuse Regular Member

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    See post #759 previous page. Indian coaches and Kashyap. Question asked and answered! :)
     
  17. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    OK.
    So do you know if Kim Ji Hyun and and Sung Ji Hyun are related? Their names are very similar.
    :)
     
  18. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Different surnames.
     
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  19. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    They could still be related though.
     
  20. Airos

    Airos Regular Member

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    Another reason I asked was because I vaguely remembered GC mentioning that Sung Ji Hyun's mother's name was Kim something.

    I did some googling:
    It's Kim YunJa.

    So may be she is related from her mother's side?
     
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