Problem doing a full squat

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by lurker, Nov 12, 2016.

  1. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    [​IMG]

    For the past few weeks i noticed it's getting tougher for me to do a full squat like the photo above a day after badminton. Is this a serious indication I hv very bad knees?

    But if u ask me to play another 2 hour session the next day I am able to.
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    May have more to do with ankle flexibility than knees

    Sent from my LG-H950 using Tapatalk
     
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  3. MidCourtMediocrity

    MidCourtMediocrity Regular Member

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    IS there any pain in a particular area of your knee when you attempt to squat? I recently developed tendonitis on my tibial tuborosity and experienced the same but at this point, I can power through it.

    If not, then you may just have weak knees/muscles around the knees
     
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  4. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    You don't say what makes it difficult in doing a full squat. There is just not enough detail to give an answer.
     
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  5. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    The knees feels very tight when squatting down and discomfort/pain when trying to get up.
    I need support (a hand on the ground) to leverage when getting up.
     
  6. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Could be meniscus (cartilage), or patella.
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Both knees? One knee?

    Where is the pain exactly?
     
  8. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    are we talking bodyweight squats or a loaded bar? If you're trying to squat like the guy in the picture, there are major technical flaws you need to overcome. That's coming from someone that squatted over 300kg in competition.
     
  9. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    Both knees. Not the muscles surrounding the knees.

    Thanks for asking questions tht could help me describing it better.
     
  10. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    Just a normal bodyweight squat. Not exercise based training.
     
  11. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    He's squatting forward rather than back. His knees have passed too far over his toes which moves the load away from the hips and onto his knees.

    Any squat with that narrow stance would need the heels to leave the floor to maintain the correct load distribution.

    Look for Hindu squats on YouTube.
     
  12. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    Even if you're not using a bar you should use a wider stance and I think a better back posture than that. He seems to be bending his lower back a lot.

    Also consider that there are multiple 'correct' forms for squatting. I used to get shouted out for not doing high bar squats, but I found them wildly impractical compared to low bar.
     
  13. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    High bar forces you to lean forward
     
  14. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    That's what I found, and with pretty long legs... But it's hard to explain to the 5'7 guy that high bar is not practical for my leg length..
     
  15. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    [IveE="Charlie-SWUK, post: 2507883, member: 120700"]That's what I found, and with pretty long legs... But it's hard to explain to the 5'7 guy that high bar is not practical for my leg length..[/QUOTE]

    I've always coached high bar out of people.
     
  16. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    I've always coached high bar out of people.[/QUOTE]
    I don't blame you. I don't see any massive benefit over low bar. Low bar you can load a lot more weight and keep it directly over the hips.
     
  17. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Hi Lurker.

    It looks like it is difficult to describe the problems you have. The problem may be very vague.

    I suggest that if you are worried, you need to see a doctor or a physiotherapist. They can they ask more directed questions combined with an examination of the knees.
     

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