Seeking advice: forehand shallow shot

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Hbmao, Dec 4, 2019 at 12:05 PM.

  1. Hbmao

    Hbmao Regular Member

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    This is for doubles. By Shallow shot I mean a soft block from the opponent, close to the net but not a drop. This usually happens when the opponent returns a smash or a clear straight, so I move forward and see the opponent in the back corner. Now what should I do?

    I am quite comfortable on the backhand side for such a shot. I can do a cross drop which usually catches the front player in surprise. Or I can do a cross flat lift which often forces a backhand or weak overhead return of the back player.

    However I’m not nearly as comfortable on the forehand side. My forehand cross drop is not as polished. And if I play the cross lift, I can’t generate enough speed to make it effective (plus it’s going toward opponent’s forehand corner) So I end up playing straight drop and straight lift (to the tram line towards opponent’s backhand) more, which are not usually effective.

    This bothers me quite a bit as I see this as an advantageous scenario but just couldnt profit. Any suggestion, on shot selection or drills to better the shot, is appreciated.
     
  2. Ballschubser

    Ballschubser Regular Member

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    Try to play a high serve, on with your forhand and one with your backhand. I'm sure, that you are able to play a much better forhand high serve than a backhand one. Therefor this is not really an issue of power generation.

    I think, that the difference here could be how much you swing your racket, your wrist mobility and how much finger power you use.

    - Wrist mobility
    Go infront of the net, now hold the racket infront of you so that the racket shaft lies on the top of the net. What is more comfortable, a backhand grip or a forhand grip. I think, that a backhand grip is more comfortable and you can even rotate the racket more to the ground without issues. But the forhand grip will limit your movement. Rotating the racket more to the ground could be really limited.

    - Swing
    Due to mobility limitation you will be able to swing more with a backhand grip than with a forhand grip. If you generate a lot of power by swinging, you will have issues to generate the same power from your forhand.

    - Fingerpower
    Finger power is an other issue. If you need to limit your swing (which is often prefered to deceive the opponent), you need to generate more power from your fingers.This might be something where you could try to practise. A quick test: make a low backhand serve, but stretch out your racket arm and do the serve without moving the arm at all. Just your wrist and finger, no swing with your forarm. Are you able to make a consistent low serve this way ?

    To practise this, try to play forhand and backhand shuttle with minimal swing.
     
  3. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Your situation is unclear, you say your opponent just returned a smash/clear i.e. they should be in the sides/defence position, not in a front/back orientation, so why are your opponents in a front/back position when you retrieve the soft block?

    Let's just assume your are early at the net so an opponents soft block, where are your opponents standing, and how did they end up in that position? It influences the appropriate response...after all, I would invite you to 'stand in their shoes' and consider what they would not want you to do!
     
  4. Hbmao

    Hbmao Regular Member

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    Thanks. This makes a lot of sense. I think the problem is indeed I can’t generate power on the forehand side with limited swing. Will be more conscious about this.
     

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