Serve and return in singles

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Evanplaysbadminton, Oct 13, 2020.

  1. Evanplaysbadminton

    Evanplaysbadminton Regular Member

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    Hey,

    I watched a video on youtube and the guy said, it's better to do a low serve at the middle of the half-court when you serve. So instead of focusing on the "T", you should aim for the middle, between the "T" and the sideline. But he didn't explain. I've always thought it was better to aim for the "T".

    Also, he said, the best way to return a low serve was to aim for the rear forehand of the opponent but didn't tell why... I've always thought it was better to aim for the backhand on the rearcourt.

    If you have a few explanations I'd be thankful.
     
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  2. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    Assuming that one actually serves with short serve in singles, it's easier to put some speed on the shuttle so your opponent doesn't have much time to be deceptive. A faster serve will naturally land a bit further into the box. A serve to the T, something more seen in doubles, would have to be slower and many players have the opportunity to hold and delay their shot, putting you under a lot of pressure on your serve. In terms of where to aim when returning, all four corners are viable. It depends on your shot quality and your opponent's reaction/speed.
     
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  3. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    This. When talking about the length of the serve. A slow serve will allow your opponent to hit the shuttle higher and closer to the net, opening up the length of the court, even tight netshots are possible. This puts more pressure on you.


    I understand this is not about the length though.
    When aiming for the T, or the line, there's a risk of hitting out, while aiming for the middle of the half court is a safe option, that also likely puts your opponent in a position where he has to choose between forehand and backhand and that can be a disadvantage. Also hitting a shuttle just in front of your body is more difficult.

    The question would be what you gain from aiming for the T/line?

    This is true for doubles, too.

    As always, vary the speed and placement of a shot, including a serve.

    I don't see why this should be true.
     
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  4. DuckFeet

    DuckFeet Regular Member

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    Is the "aiming for forehand" thing such that you set up for a smash the other side - onto the weaker backhand, rather than BH lift and then smashing into the stronger forehand side?

    Sent from my SM-A315G using Tapatalk
     
  5. Evanplaysbadminton

    Evanplaysbadminton Regular Member

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    Thanks.

    I understand better about serving towards the middle of half court instead of the T in order to avoid missing the shot.

    I haven't thought about aiming for the middle but deeper.
    But what do you mean by faster serve ? I should just put more power into my serve ?
    So far I've only used high serves and low serves but low serves exactly like double serves. I don't know how to make them faster.
    But I get now why I was in a difficult position after a low serve performed like doubles.

    For the return in the forehand back court.
    The guy just analyzed and video and noticed both players were doing this.

    In my case, I do both, sometimes even in the middle.
     
  6. dnewguy

    dnewguy Regular Member

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    Should I ask my doubts on 'the singles serve/return' here ?
     
  7. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    Well usually on a forum, if you have a question related to something said within a thread then you can ask within the thread. And when you have your own question then you can make a new thread. In this case the person that posted the question is still questioning things, and there may be some English language issues too for you and/or them, so more reason why it's better for you to start your own thread.

    On this forum I have noticed that some quite like the idea of a person wanting "help" to make a thread with some general title that ends up dozens or more pages long, though you needn't follow that route

    If you are not sure then make your own thread with your question. On this and many other forums that's a norm and you can't go far wrong doing that. And in this particular case also I'd suggest your own thread with your question.
     
    #7 ralphz, Oct 18, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2020
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  8. Evanplaysbadminton

    Evanplaysbadminton Regular Member

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    Did you mean I should also vary the speed when serving in doubles ?
    How do I do so ? I put more power in the movement ?
     
  9. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    More thumb power. It's just a little bit more push on your serve.
     
  10. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    I did not say that, I did not mean that. I tried to separate the speed/length discussion from the width discussion.

    If you can vary the speed of a serve without it being too high in doubles, yes, do it. That's no so easy/close to impossible though using the same stance and a similar looking movement.

    One option to do it is to undercut the shuttle, to slice it going underneath it. It will cause the shuttle to turn quicker, thus arrive at your opponent quicker. Quite a different effect from a slice from the backcourt or a tumbling net shot. This is especially efficient when you can vary it from the same movement, but for a doubles serve, consistency is the number one goal, so no, I would not advise to do that until you can hit some targets, that I set up for you (the size of a shuttle tube, regarding height, length, and width), with your first try consistently when closing your eyes before serving.

    The difference in doubles is that
    • you don't have to cover the full length of the court after serving
    • your opponent doesn't have to cover the full length of the court when receiving the serve
    The first point gives you the option to stand much closer to the net, giving your opponent less time to react, while that makes it harder for you to vary the speed without getting either too short or too high. The second point makes it easier for you opponent to cover flick serves, which makes him stand further in front, punishing inconsistent serves immediately.
     

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