Singapore Also Can

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Loh, May 4, 2009.

  1. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    Look, it’s ‘Jackie’ selling fish in Singapore

    Monday February 8, 2010

    http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/2/8/nation/5634780&sec=nation (picture at link)

    A FISHMONGER in Singapore has been enjoying good business because he looks like popular actor Jackie Chan, reported China Press.

    Zhang Sui Xing, 48, who has been selling fish at a market in Empress Road for more than 20 years, has women coming to his stall because he resembles the actor.

    “Many customers call me Jackie Chan and also refer others to buy from me. My stall has also ended up being called the ‘Jackie Chan’ stall,” he said.

    A customer said many people knew Zhang because he had 90% of Chan’s looks, with his big nose, hairstyle and muscles.

    Zhang said he had not met Chan in person but had watched all of his movies.

    He had also acted in the Singaporean movie, I not stupid, playing the role of Chan.

    “Many people have also asked for my autograph. When I said I am not Chan, they ask whether I am Chan’s brother and insist on my autograph,” he said.

    Zhang also enjoys discounts because of his looks and sales assistants allow him to cut queues in order to take a closer look at him.

    (picture at link)
     
  2. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    if he gain some weight, he would look more like jackie
     
  3. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    My friend, this is not a fair question to one who only knows about HK and how superior it is to Spore! :rolleyes:

    He has forgotten that the more affluent and mobile HongKongers were desparately trying to escape from mainland communist China not too long ago when their British colonial masters had to give up the territory by law and now they have to thank their lucky stars that were allowed to return to share in their motherland's prosperity. :p

    He should not look too far ahead and worry about Spore's productivity and resilience as Hong Kong herself has now to pull up her socks to meet the competitiion from Shanghai, Beijing and other fast growing mainland cities. :eek:

    Spore's leaders have so far managed not only to ensure Spore's survival since independence but also turn this tiny red dot into a prosperous country in this region and it is not likely that they will allow current events to derail its achievements and progress.
     
    #1143 Loh, Feb 7, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2010
  4. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    I think this guy should apply to become Jackie Chan's double. He would be more popular and earn more income, I believe. :D
     
  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Actually nothing is impossible! :D

    But it also depends on how much Malaysia has changed as much as Spore is still undergoing change to achieve its ultimate goals.

    This is how Spore wants to be:

    The Singapore Pledge

    We, the citizens of Singapore, pledge ourselves as one united people, regardless of race, language or religion, to build a democratic society, based on justice and equality so as to achieve happiness, prosperity and progress for our nation.
     
  6. Pemuda

    Pemuda Regular Member

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    Opps ... my bad, I though taneepak is from Singapore. Ohhh Hong Kong, eh? I like Hong Kong, though I never been there. I like Edison Chen and Kate Tsui. Ohh ... I also like Gurmit Singh of Singapore. And Fann Wong too.

    Ok then I pose my question to you then. How?
     
  7. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I can really tell but I strongly believe that Singapore will not be what it is now in 60 years' time. Let us be realistic. A tiny piece of real estate with a tiny population cannot become a country of real substance. Yes, it may become a Monaco, a playground of the rich and famous.
    With such low productivity from its local manpower, Singapore will have to head the way of Dubai by relying on foreign workers for its economic growth.
    For example a dim sum chef in Hong Kong earns at least US$3,000 to US$5,000 a month. This may be expensive when compared with Singapore's dim sum chef but the humble HK chef has higher productivity. The Hong Kong dim sum chef prepares and sells perhaps 10 or more times more dim sum than his Singapore counterpart. This translates into higher productivity. He earns more oney but his the labour cost component of his dim sum is much lower than Singapore's.
    Also in Hong Kong there are street vendors who are rated a one-star Michelin eatery by Michelin. His snacks may cost a mere US$1 a piece but he takes home at least US10,000 a month. This is productivity.
     
  8. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Singapore Airshow welcomed 112,000 visitors

    Channel NewsAsia
    07 February 2010 1825 hrs

    By Asha Popatlal,

    SINGAPORE : After a series of highs, the week-long Singapore Airshow has come to a close.

    Wrapping up, organisers said over 112,000 visitors had walked through its doors.

    Over 41,000 trade visitors from 122 countries and regions came to the event, while about 71,000 people showed up on the last two days, when the event was opened to the public.


    I was there last Saturday

    It was late morning and the sun was smiling happily. Without a vehicle label, I had to park my bike at a secluded spot near the beach. There were only a few mainly young people who came on their bicycles. Like me they were interested in the morning aerial displays which had just started. This is an excellent place to watch with the trees as shelter and the sea breeze cooling your face.

    The show lasted about 45 minutes and I had to walk a long way to the Changi Exhibition Centre where the action was supposed to be. The blazing sun did not relent and I had to endure the heat all of more than 2km, protected only on my head with the Badminton World Championships 2009 cap presented to me by Abedeng as souvenir.

    Local ST Engineering dominated the indoor exhibits. Rolls Royce was the star exhibitor with its turbine engines and blades. There were defence-related machines and inventions on show which attracted much attention. But the outdoor exhibits, the static aircraft displays and the afternoon air displays were the highlights.

    I wish there were more exciitng aerial displays though. Here are some of the pictures I captured: :)
     

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  9. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    What can I say of one who is Msian but resides in HK for perhaps half his life and only spells doomsday for Spore? :D
     
  10. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    So long as we have enough able and committed leaders who can move the citizenry with their words and deeds that match the Singapore Pledge, Singapore will survive. :)

    Unlike our friend who only sees doomsday on his crystal ball for Spore, maybe he can predict a bright future for HK? :rolleyes:
     
  11. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Singapore Air Show 2010

    More pictures outdoors for the static displays and aerial displays:
     

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  12. abedeng

    abedeng Regular Member

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    Nice air pics, Loh. But you should show at higher resolution ......
     
  13. szekt

    szekt Regular Member

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    LOL, how did the power rangers become associated with the airshow??:D:D
     
  14. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Actually, I have worked in a few countries, including Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Thailand, and Hong Kong. Australians are the laziest; Hong Kong workers are tops. I was very popular with the weaker *** in these countries but that was a long time ago.
    Hong Kong, being a laissez faire piece of "rock", is very unlike heavily regulated Singapore. Here it is free for all, a very fertile ground for entrepreneurs of all shades, from real business to show business ala the likes of Edison Chen.
    For SE Asians visiting Hong Kong the frist thing that strikes them is how fast Hong Kong people walk. Even a lady in high heels will leave a Singaporean or Malaysian young man behind when walking. This is Hong Kong's footprint of being super-competitive.
    Now, I am still surrounded by more females than males. I thought I have retired many moons ago but they still treat me as leader of the pack. The females around me are getting younger as the older ones left because they felt being ignored. That is what makes me feel young.
    Pemuda, I guess the situation in Malaysia is not so "friendly", from what I have heard from my good Malay friend in KL. I had three ex-Malay girl friends in KL (of all places, Kampong Bahru), Bentong, and Raub and would very much want to meet them, but my Malay friend advised me that it would not be wise. Even my telephone attempt to contact one was being heavily screened. Pemuda, what has changed?
     
  15. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    How do I do this?

    If I post the pictures intact here, I will get a 'friendly' note to say that they are "oversized"! :eek:

    So everytime I have to downsize to fit the specs! And of course it has an adverse impact on the pics. :(
     
  16. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    I guess that's one way to attract the youngsters to the show! ;)
     
  17. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    New cancer centre opens

    The Straits Times
    Feb 8, 2010

    By Joan Chew


    SINGAPORE'S cancer population is set to grow at an alarming rate. Back in 1997, there were 7,000 new cancer patients. A decade later, the number rose to 9,000. By 2015, there will be an expected 13,000 new cancer patients.

    Singapore's newest cancer centre - the National University Cancer Institute (NCIS) - will help to cater to this growing number of cancer patients, said Professor John Wong, Director of NCIS, at a media briefing on Monday.

    Presently, the National Cancer Centre is the only institute which handles about 70 per cent of the cancer population, said a spokesman.

    In contrast, NCIS sees about a quarter of the cancer population, but expects to have a seven per cent increase in patient load by 2015. NCIS will be formally inaugurated on Tuesday by Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong. It was renamed from The Cancer Institute in 2008.

    Besides catering to adult and child patients 'in one facility, under one holistic programme,' Prof Wong added that the Institute, located at the National University of Singapore (NUS), will focus on cancer research and education. He said: 'NCIS aims to be a leading comprehensive cancer centre dedicated to the prevention, management and cure of cancer.'

    NCIS scientists will be conducting translational clinical research in collaboration with institutions like the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, NUS as well as the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star).


    Singapore's newest cancer centre - the National University Cancer Institute (NCIS) - will help to cater to this growing number of cancer patients. -- PHOTO: NCIS
     

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  18. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    $4.8m grants for 5 projects

    The Straits Times
    Feb 8, 2010


    FIVE research projects have been awarded $4.8 million grants under the Environment Technology Research Programme (ETRP) to develop waste management solutions for Singapore.

    Administered by the National Environment Agency (NEA) and Environment and Water Industry Development Council (EWI), the programme is an initiative to build up technological competencies in waste management and to support a growing ecosystem of companies and researchers undertaking Clean Environment Research and Development (R&D).

    The five approved projects are proposed by National University of Singapore (NUS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Nanyang Polytechnic (NYP), and they were selected after a rigorous evaluation of 67 proposals received from the academia and industry at the close of the inaugural Request-For-Proposal (RFP) on Aug 31 last year.

    The projects represent a good mix of innovative research work in the field of waste management covering the key focus areas of energy recovery, resource recovery and special waste treatment.

    Mr Andrew Tan, Chief Executive Officer of NEA, said: 'The encouraging response for ETRP is a reflection of the growing waste management market worldwide, an area that Singapore can tap into. These five successful projects possess strong scientific merits and excellent research capabilities that will help develop sustainable and cost efficient waste management solutions for use not only in Singapore but also other countries that are facing similar waste challenges.


    Details of the 5 research projects

    1. Nanyang Polytechnic - Led by Ms Sim Gia Wen, the project will develop lower cost Cerium Dioxide (CeO2) catalyst elements to remove gaseous air pollutants such as Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). Presently, catalyst materials are based on the more expensive Titanium Dioxide (TiO2). This innovation could lead to further improvement in air quality and lower the cost of air pollution control solutions for waste incinerators, power stations and industrial combustion processes.

    2. National University of Singapore - Professor Kang En Tang will lead a team of researchers to improve the current practices in the e-waste industry to recover heavy and precious metals. The research project will develop electro-active polymers to efficiently recover precious and heavy metals from the acid solution instead of using the more energy intensive electrolysis process.

    This technology allows the acid solution to be recycled and little energy input is needed as the metal extraction occurs spontaneously in the polymers. It could potentially reduce the cost of operation and make e-waste companies more competitive and sustainable.

    3. Nanyang Technological University - A project led by Associate Professor Wang Jing-Yuan will convert mixed plastic waste into higher value biodegradable polymers known as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). PHA is the basic building block for making biodegradable materials for e.g. in medical applications such as surgical threads.

    The process involves a first stage plastic-to-oil thermal conversion and second stage oil-to-PHA synthesis using PHA accumulating microbes. The research will determine and optimize the efficiency of the process in preparation for upscaling. The researchers expect PHA materials produced from waste to be much cheaper than those produced from sugar or glucose and this could bring about better environmental, economic and social benefits.

    4. Nanyang Technological University - Dr Yan Rong and her team will optimise the gasification and pyrolysis technology to maximise the production of syngas and liquid biofuel from mixed waste streams. It would lead to a conceptual design of a pilot scale thermal treatment plant to convert MSW including sludge into bio-energy.

    Such plants could potentially be scalable, achieve higher efficiency and have a lower environmental footprint. The NTU researchers are collaborating with Sembcorp in this project with a view to demonstrate and commercialise the technology.

    5. Nanyang Technological University - Professor Ng Wun Jern and his research team will develop technologies to accelerate landfill stabilisation and to tap the landfill as a source of energy by using an enhanced biological process. The researchers will also be using Incineration Bottom Ash as a material for landfill capping and liner membrane to gainfully utilise a residue and allow large structures on completed landfill sooner.

    Redevelopment of a landfill site can be in a much shorter time frame of 10 to 15 years instead of 30 to 40 years. This is the anticipated result of deploying a sequence of microbial processes for the initial conversion of complex organic matter to short fatty acids, followed by methane generation, and thereafter biogenic gases so generated will be sequestered into polymers for enhanced stabilisation and energy recovery.

    These can add benefits to a business model which includes increased revenue from sale of recovered energy and reduce landfill aftercare costs. The project's benefits also include the development of chemical binding additives with IBA for landfill lining and capping materials.

    This will not only help address the issue of IBA disposal but will reduce subsequent costs of construction during redevelopment by reducing the need for additional reinforcement on the soil foundation. It is anticipated the project will have commercial potential in regional markets as there is growing demand to rehabilitate old landfills near urban cities for higher value real estate developments.
     
  19. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Life savers in void decks

    The Straits Times
    Feb 8, 2010

    Bukit Merah View project aims to boost chances of survival during heart attacks

    By Melissa Sim

    RESIDENTS in Bukit Merah View now have easy access to a device installed in their void decks that can boost their neighbours' chances of survival in the event of a heart attack.

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs), a smaller version of those used in hospitals to resuscitate patients whose hearts have stopped, are now in all 19 blocks in the housing estate.

    Two more are in the Henderson Community Club and the Bukit Merah View market. The precious life-saving devices are protected by anti-theft alarms.

    The initiative was started after figures showed that residents in the estate - of whom nearly half were aged above 50 - were more prone to heart attacks.

    Statistics from the National Resuscitation Council (NRC), which pushes the cause of life support and resuscitation in Singapore, revealed that the Bukit Merah and Redhill areas had about 150 cases per 100,000 residents of cardiac arrests happening outside the hospital.

    The national average is about 25 per 100,000 residents.


    Bukit Merah View residents undergoing training at Henderson CC on how to use the automated external defibrillator (AED) and perform CPR. About 140 grassroots leaders, teenagers and residents in the estate have gone through such sessions. -- ST PHOTOS: STEPHANIE YEOW
     

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  20. ctjcad

    ctjcad Regular Member

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    Off topic-You can try..

    ..if you want to keep the file's resolution as is without downsizing, you would need to use Photoshop or other image editor program (like Lightroom or GIMP or Paint.net; you can search & download them from the internet; can ask your son to help you out:)). Resizing/downsizing will always affect the resolution.
    Then open the file in one of those programs and just select & cut/clip the area of the picture that you want to keep. It'll keep the resolution higher but then you'll have to sacrifice the other parts of the picture. Then create a New file and paste what you clipped/cut.
    Or if it's still too big, you can try by reducing the picture first, say, 50% (once only). Then you do the select->cut/clip of the area you want to keep. Then create a New file & paste what you clipped/cut.
    For me, if you already have Photoshop, it will do the job. Good luck!:cool:
     
    #1160 ctjcad, Feb 8, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2010

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