Singapore Badminton Scene

Discussion in 'Professional Players' started by Loh, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Badminton: Singapore's Yeo Jia Min creates history by reaching world championships quarters

    [​IMG]
    Singapore's Yeo Jia Min during her third round women's singles match against Vietnam's Thi Trang Vu at the 2019 Badminton World Championships on Aug 22, 2019.PHOTO: REUTERS

    Published
    Aug 22, 2019, 6:40 pm SGT
    Updated
    8 hours ago


    Nicole Chia

    SINGAPORE - National shuttler Yeo Jia Min reached the quarter-finals of the BWF World Championships after beating Vietnam's Vu Thi Trang 21-15, 14-21, 21-16 on Thursday (Aug 22) after a gruelling 72-minute battle.

    It is Singapore's best result in the women's singles to date.

    At St. Jakobshalle in Basel, Switzerland, world No. 32 Yeo won the first game in 20 minutes, often getting the better of her 74th-ranked opponent in long rallies.

    Vu then raised her tempo in the second game and injected more pace into her shots as Yeo, who felt discomfort in her lower back, fumbled.

    The 20-year-old Singaporean regrouped to take the lead in the third game, often putting pressure on Vu's forehand. Yeo sank to her knees in relief after converting her fourth match point.

    "I felt relieved because I was determined to win," she said.

    Yeo, who defeated world No. 1 Akane Yamaguchi in the second round of the tournament on Tuesday, was constantly referred to as a giant-killer by commentators on Thursday.

    But she felt no pressure ahead of her match against Vu, saying of the four match points: "I felt collected and focused on the match, and reminded myself of things I could control.

    "I feel happy and excited to enter the quarter-finals."

    The former world junior No. 1 will face 2013 world champion Ratchanok Intanon of Thailand, who beat Indonesian Gregoria Mariaka Tunjung 18-21, 23-21, 21-10, in the quarter-finals on Friday.

    While Yeo advanced, teammate Loh Kean Yew failed in his bid to reach the last eight. The world No. 34 lost 21-13, 18-21, 21-17 to world No. 2 Chou Tien-chen of Chinese Taipei in the third round.

    Ronald Susilo was the last local man to reach the quarter-final stage at the 2007 edition.
     
  2. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Wouldn't she deserve to have an own player's thread by now? Looking at her current game, I can see crystal clear future-Top10 potential.
     
  3. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Badminton: Yeo Jia Min is first Singapore women's singles player to reach World Championships q-finals
    [​IMG]
    Chia Han Keong
    Editor
    Yahoo News Singapore 22 August 2019


    [​IMG]
    (SCREENSHOT: Yeo Jia Min after scoring the winning match point against Vietnam’s Vu Thi Trang at the Badminton World Championships on 22 August 2019)

    SINGAPORE — Fresh from her giant-killing feat of beating the women’s world No. 1 shuttler, Yeo Jia Min emerged triumphant again on Thursday (22 August), becoming the first Singaporean player to advance into the women’s singles quarter-finals of the Badminton World Championships.

    The 20-year-old beat Vietnam’s Vu Thi Trang 21-15, 14-21, 21-16 in her round-of-16 tie in Basel, Switzerland, despite suffering back pains during the second game.

    She sets up a quarter-final tie with Thailand’s Ratchanok Intanon, the 2013 world champion, who defeated Indonesia’s Gregoria Mariska Tunjung 18-21, 23-21, 21-10.

    Yeo, a former junior world No. 1 and current world No. 32, had defeated women’s top seed Akane Yamaguchi of Japan on Tuesday, the biggest upset so far in this edition of the World Championships.

    With her first-ever win over 27-year-old Vu – who was a bronze medallist at the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympics in Singapore – Yeo has topped the efforts of Li Li, the only other Singapore women’s singles player to reach the last-16, back in 2005. Li had lost to France’s Pi Hongyan then.

    Ronald Susilo was the only other Singaporean singles player to reach the World Championships quarter-finals, when he beat China’s Chen Jin 21-19, 21-14 in the 2007 Kuala Lumpur edition.

    Men’s singles player Loh Kean Yew was unable to follow the footsteps of Yeo and Susilo, when the 22-year-old lost his round-of-16 tie 13-21, 21-18, 17-21 to men’s world No. 2 Chou Tien-chen of Taiwan later on Thursday.
     
  4. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    History made as Yeo Jia Min reaches World Championship quarter-finals
    [​IMG]
    Yeo Jia Min sinking to her knees after defeating Vietnam's Vu Thi Trang 21-15, 14-21, 21-16 yesterday. PHOTO: REUTERS

    Shuttler, 20, achieves S'pore's best women's singles showing at world c'ships
    Aug 23, 2019 06:00 am

    Shuttler Yeo Jia Min made history yesterday by becoming the first Singaporean woman to reach the quarter-finals of the BWF World Championships.

    The 20-year-old defeated Vietnam's Vu Thi Trang 21-15, 14-21, 21-16 after a gruelling 72-minute battle at the St Jakobshalle arena in Basel, Switzerland, to seal her place in the last eight.

    Yeo, who is ranked world No. 32, will face Thailand's world No. 6 Ratchanok Intanon today for a place in the semi-finals.

    Admitting that she was more relieved than excited after beating the 74th-ranked Vu, Yeo was elated to have achieved the Republic's best women's singles showing at the World Championships.

    "I'm honoured and will continue to strive for glory for Singapore," she said.

    Her next opponent Ratchanok, 24, showed why she won the world title in 2013 when she saved two match-points en route to beating Indonesia's Gregoria Mariska Tunjung 18-21, 23-21, 21-10 in a later quarter-final.

    When asked for her thoughts on meeting the 2015 SEA Games champion who had beaten her 21-7, 21-12 at the German Open in February, Yeo said: "Looking to fight again on the court."

    Yeo, who had defeated world No. 1 Akane Yamaguchi in the Round of 32 on Tuesday, got off to a good start against Vu yesterday when she won the first game 21-15 in 20 minutes.

    But Vu, 27, stepped up the pace in the second game as Yeo, who received treatment for a lower-back discomfort, stumbled and lost 14-21.

    Yeo, however, regained the initiative in the third game. Trailing 2-3, she turned the tables to snatch the lead at 4-3 and never relinquished it.

    She sank to her knees after converting her fourth match-point, saying: "I felt relieved because I was determined to win."

    Badminton fans in Singapore have been delighted by the performances of their shuttlers at the World Championships.

    One of them, Lui Syenkai, a 29-year-old bank compliance officer, said: "Since the arrival of coach Mulyo (Handoyo), I feel that the quality of the Singapore badminton players has gradually improved.

    "Results are showing through more wins and podium finishes recently.

    "I am very excited especially for our singles players (Loh Kean Yew and Yeo Jia Min) as they both are scaling greater heights and breaking records at the World Championships."

    The winner of the tie between Yeo and Ratchanok will meet either Japan's Nozomi Okuhara or China's He Bingjiao in the semi-finals.

    The last time a Singaporean shuttler reached the last eight of the World Championship singles competition was in 2007, when Ronald Susilo's brave run in the men's event was halted by China's Chen Yu.

    In the men's singles yesterday, Singapore's world No. 34 Loh Kean Yew came close to emulating that feat.

    The 22-year-old stretched world No. 2 Chou Tien-chen to the rubber but lost their Round-of-16 tie 13-21, 21-18, 17-21.

    Chou's quarter-final opponent will be either India's Srikanth Kidambi or Thailand's Kantaphon Wangcharoen.

    Other big names such as world No. 1 Kento Momota and fifth-ranked Chen Long also progressed to the last eight.

    Top seed Momota defeated India's Prannoy H.S. 21-19, 21-12 and will meet Malaysia's Lee Zii Jia next.
     
  5. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Thanks for your encouragement.
    We will wait for the right moment.
     
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  6. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Badminton: Singapore tipped to end singles duck at SEA Games

    [​IMG]
    Loh Kean Yew, 22, and Yeo Jia Min, 20, back in Singapore after their fine run at the World Championships in Basel, Switzerland. Yeo even had an upset win over world No. 1 Akane Yamaguchi en route to the last eight. PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO

    Published
    5 hours ago

    Shuttlers set to make SEA Games impact with better mentality, decision-making

    Kimberly Kwek

    With just three podium finishes in the last five SEA Games' singles competition, Singapore is looking to two burgeoning talents - Loh Kean Yew and Yeo Jia Min - to turn the sport's fortunes around.

    National singles head coach Mulyo Handoyo is aiming for medals in both singles events at the Nov 30-Dec 11 Games in the Philippines to end a four-year drought.

    He said: "Both of them have improved a lot in terms of their mentality and they dare to make decisions. Their standard has also improved."

    Loh, 22, won a singles bronze on his Games debut four years ago. But the women have not won an individual medal since Fu Mingtian clinched the women's singles gold in Indonesia in 2011.

    The Republic's hopes have been boosted by the duo's promising performances at last week's BWF World Championships, where Yeo reached the quarter-finals and Loh made the top 16.

    World No. 32 Yeo, the first Singaporean woman to make it to the top eight, stunned world No. 1 Japanese Akane Yamaguchi in the second round. The 20-year-old then defeated Vietnam's Vu Thi Trang, but her fairy-tale run ended after a loss to former world champion Ratchanok Intanon of Thailand.

    Loh had triumphed over Indian 10th seed Sameer Verma in the first round and beat world No. 54 Thomas Rouxel of France before losing to No. 2 Chou Tien-chen of Chinese Taipei in the round of 16.

    WHY THEY'LL SUCCEED

    Both of them have improved a lot in terms of their mentality and they dare to make decisions. Their standard has also improved.

    MULYO HANDOYO, Singapore badminton singles head coach, on the progress of Loh Kean Yew and Yeo Jia Min.

    Singapore Badminton Association (SBA) president Lawrence Leow said: "This is encouraging, it shows that anything is possible.

    "They were able to exceed expectations and I believe this puts players in a good position for the upcoming SEA Games.

    "We have to show consistency and show that we can match the others. We are in the region where the top nations in badminton are, so SEA Games is not anything short of the World Championships."

    At the last SEA Games in Kuala Lumpur in 2017, Singapore won two bronzes in the men and women's team. With more medals at the multi-sport meet being targeted, the SBA is beefing up the players' preparations by bringing in sparring partners from the region.

    One of them is Indonesia's world No. 16 Tommy Sugiarto, the 2014 World Championships bronze medallist who will be in Singapore this week for a week-long stint.

    The SBA is looking to recruit four to six sparring partners, who are, or have been, ranked in the top 20, for a centralised training stint from Oct 14 to Nov 23.

    Yeo and Loh had spent three and four months respectively training and competing in Denmark's club leagues. They credited the stint for their improvement.

    Loh welcomed the move to test his skills against other top players in the region.

    He said: "This time, they're bringing in sparring partners and it's good because it still feels like home, so I can do whatever routine I've been doing.

    "It will help the other players, bring us together and we can rise to that level together."

    (Heartening to note both our singles players are improving. But against the likes of the top players of Indonesia, Malaysia and now Thailand, our players will have to play above themselves to have any chance at all.)
     
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Badminton: Yeo Jia Min eyes SEA Games medal in the Philippines after world championships breakthrough

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    Yeo Jia Min's performance at the championships in Basel, Switzerland, has shown she is able to compete with the elite.PHOTO: REUTERS

    Published
    Aug 24, 2019, 9:53 pm SGT

    Nicole Chia

    SINGAPORE - Her fairy-tale run at the Badminton World Federation (BWF) World Championships may have ended with a loss on Friday (Aug 23) but Yeo Jia Min has served notice of her burgeoning talent and is already eyeing the next step in her development.

    Winning a medal at the year-end SEA Games in the Philippines is the minimum she expects of herself, the Singapore shuttler told The Straits Times on Saturday.

    She said: "I'm always thinking (of ways) I can improve myself.

    "Badminton requires so many things (to come together) but, recently, I have worked on my footwork and mental strength.

    "I gained some experience through training and competing overseas, and I also watch and try to learn from other good players.

    "My goal at the SEA Games is to win at least a medal."

    The last Singaporean female shuttler to finish on the podium at the biennial Games was Fu Mingtian, who won the singles gold at the 2011 edition in Indonesia.

    Yeo's performance at the championships in Basel, Switzerland, has shown she is able to compete with the elite.

    She stunned world No. 1 Akane Yamaguchi of Japan in the second round on Tuesday and, while she lost 21-17, 21-11 to 2013 world champion Ratchanok Intanon in the last eight, Yeo mostly held her own against the world No. 6 Thai.

    The 20-year-old Yeo, born in Singapore to Malaysian parents who are permanent residents, was the youngest of all quarter-finalists and also the only unseeded player. She is the first local woman to reach the last eight of the competition.

    She said: "My movement was slower than Ratchanok's and my shot quality was not high enough to pressure her... I tried to push myself but I was still slower.

    "It's my first time playing in the quarter-final of a big competition. It's a good experience."

    Beyond her aspirations for the Nov 30-Dec 11 SEA Games, there is also qualification for next year's Tokyo Olympics to work towards.

    Yeo, who reached a career high of world No. 29 in June, will improve on her No. 32 ranking when the latest standings are released on Tuesday.

    She will book her ticket to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics if she is within the top 38 in BWF’s Olympic rankings by April 28 next year.

    Unlike the world rankings, which take into account points from the top 10 competitions in the last 52 weeks, the Olympic rankings take in points from only a player’s 10 best tournaments in the qualifying period.

    "I try not to think about the ranking but I always try to find out how to improve myself because it's important when playing against (strong) opponents that I improve my game to match (their level)," said the former junior world No. 1, who has won three BWF titles.

    "People will expect me to play better after this but I just try to focus on what I can do and not to put pressure on myself.

    "I really enjoy (fighting) on court and I treasure every chance I get to play.

    A two-month professional stint with Danish club Ab Aarhus has aided her improvement, and Yeo believes national singles head coach Mulyo Handoyo's training programme has also benefited her.

    She said: "I have many areas I need to work on.

    "But this competition gives me confidence to keep believing in myself. I've learnt more about myself and how I need to better maintain my physical condition.

    "To become a champion I have to be consistent everyday, and not just for a few days."

    Mulyo noted Yeo's game has seen an overall improvement. Referring to her and teammate Loh Kean Yew, who reached the last 16, he said: "They should continue to train and build a strong foundation for them to compete in the Olympic qualification period, and to have consistent performances."
     
  8. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    National shuttlers post record highs in world rankings
    https://www.tnp.sg/sports/team-singapore/national-shuttlers-post-record-highs-world-rankings


    [​IMG]
    National shuttlers Loh Kean Yew (left) and Yeo Jia Min. PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO

    [​IMG]
    Dilenjit Singh

    Sub Editor
    Aug 28, 2019 06:00 am

    Singapore's Yeo Jia Min and Loh Kean Yew both reached record highs in the latest BWF (Badminton World Federation) world rankings released yesterday, after impressive performances at last week's World Championships in Basel.

    Loh, 22, moved up three places in the men's singles standings to world No. 31.

    In Switzerland, he beat 10th seed Sameer Verma and Thomas Rouxel, before pushing world No. 2 Chou Tien-chen all the way in the last-16, eventually succumbing 13-21, 21-18, 17-21.

    Yeo went one better, becoming the first Singaporean woman to reach the singles quarter-final at the worlds.

    She upset world No. 1 Akane Yamaguchi en route to the last eight, before eventually losing to former world champion and current world No. 6 Ratchanok Intanon of Thailand.

    The 20-year-old Singaporean, who was South-east Asia's second-best performer in the women's singles after bronze-medallist Ratchanok, moved up four places to No. 28 in the world rankings.


    Yeo told The New Paper that she was happy with the "continuous progress" up the rankings and said she was targeting a place "around the top 10" by the time places for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo are decided by April 28 next year.

    Said the former junior world No. 1: "I feel happy to see continuous progress in my ranking because it will also help me to take part in top competitions.

    "I do not really focus on the rankings, but more on doing my best to see improvement in my game and hopefully winning more matches, especially with Tokyo 2020 coming soon.

    "By next April, I hope to be around the top 10 in the world."

    Loh, meanwhile, said: "I'm on the right track, but what I need is consistency.

    "In competition and in training, I need to have consistency in my performances. My target for this year is to break into the top 30."
     
  9. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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  10. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    #1470 Loh, Sep 3, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
    groucher likes this.
  11. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    #1471 Loh, Sep 4, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  12. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Badminton: Loh Kean Yew upsets world No. 11 Angus Ng at Chinese Taipei Open
    https://www.straitstimes.com/sport/...s-world-no-11-angus-ng-at-chinese-taipei-open
    [​IMG]
    Singapore shuttler Loh Kean Yew during the Badminton World Championships in Switzerland.PHOTO: BADMINTONPHOTO
    Published
    Sep 4, 2019, 11:56 pm SGT

    SINGAPORE - World No. 28 men's singles player Loh Kean Yew upset second-seeded Angus Ng 21-19, 21-12 in the first round of the Chinese Taipei Open on Wednesday (Sept 4).

    Loh, who beat 10th seed Sameer Verma at the BWF World Championships in Basel last month, took just 35 minutes to beat the world No. 11, and will face Japan's Koki Watanabe next on Thursday.

    Also through to the next round are Singaporeans Danny Bawa Chrisnanta and Loh Kean Hean, who beat home duo Chang Ko-chi and Lu Chia-pin 23-21, 23-21 in the men's doubles. The pair will face fourth seeds Goh V Shem and Tan Wee Kiong of Malaysia in the second round.

    However, Yeo Jia Min - who memorably made the quarter-finals of the world championships last month - is out of the tournament in Taiwan, after her 21-19, 21-14 loss to second seed Michelle Li of Canada in the women's singles.
     
  13. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Commentary: Yeo Jia Min surprised us. Are the good old days of Wong Peng Soon back?

    Yeo Jia Min may have yet to win a World or Olympic medal for Singapore, but a giant-slaying performance at the recent Badminton World Federation World Championships rekindled something special in the hearts of Singaporeans, says Jan Lin Lee.

    [​IMG]
    Singapore's Yeo Jia Min serves a shuttlecock to Vietnam's Thi Trang Vu during their women's singles round of sixteen match at the BWF Badminton World Championships in the St Jakobshalle in Basel, Switzerland, on Aug 22, 2019. (Photo: Georgios Kefalas/Keystone via AP)

    By Jan Lin Lee

    06 Sep 2019 06:32AM (Updated: 06 Sep 2019 06:40AM


    WASHINGTON DC: “Are the days of Wong Peng Soon back?” was the curious cry of many Singaporeans after 20-year-old Yeo Jia Min shocked the World No. 1, Akane Yamaguchi of Japan, in the second round of the 2019 Badminton World Federation World Championships.

    While it is premature to conclude from this big upset of hers, there is one thing the nation can be absolutely certain of: We love a David versus Goliath underdog sports story.

    And probably more than most other nations, too.

    THE MAKING OF THE UNDERDOG

    When Singapore-born-and-bred Joseph Schooling won Singapore’s first Olympic gold medal at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, the ecstasy that engulfed the nation was multi-layered.

    Many Singaporeans empathise with the financial and personal sacrifices of Joseph’s parents, Colin and May Schooling. Joseph Schooling was 21 when he stood on top of the Olympic podium, but it took a journey of at least 15 years to get there.

    It was a massive gamble to send young Joseph to the United States on his own to train with and go up against some of the world’s best for a shot at Olympic glory.

    The enormity of what he achieved was artfully captured in an unprecedented three-way silver medal tie between Michael Phelps (US), Chad Le Clos (South Africa) and Laszlo Cseh (Hungary).

    Goliath(s) fell.

    The odds-defying triumph rekindled hopes of another win on the world sporting stage in the hearts of Singaporeans. Yet, why are we not seeing more of these gritty world-beaters in Singapore sports?

    [​IMG]
    Joseph Schooling competes at the 2016 Rio Olympics. (Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)
    THE CURIOUS CASE OF SINGAPORE BADMINTON

    Singapore has chosen to rely on the Foreign Sports Talent Scheme rather heavily for what is often widely perceived as a quick medal-fix for Singapore sports on the global sporting stage.

    The scheme most notably yielded a table tennis silver medal at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. It was Singapore’s first Olympic medal since Tan Howe Liang’s weightlifting silver at the Rome 1960 Olympic Games. Yet it sparked more debate than cheer.

    Table tennis and badminton were the two sports that leaned heavily on the Foreign Talent Scheme but the scheme in badminton was completely abandoned by Rio 2016.

    Turning to the Foreign Talent Scheme for badminton has always been a controversial move. It was a vision that the ever-vibrant badminton community in Singapore never quite caught on to as well.

    At the grassroots level, the appetite for the sport is evident from community centres to the exuberant school sports badminton scene (at least in the 1990s to 2000s), where the former local greats from Wong Shoon Keat, Irene Wong, Hamid Khan to Wee Choon Seng have all dedicated their lives to coaching in local schools.

    Stepping into Wong Shoon Keat’s little shop at the former Singapore Badminton Hall on Guillemard Road always served up a dose of inspiration for young local shuttlers to believe he or she too could win a coveted SEA Games gold medal as Mr Wong did in 1983.

    [​IMG]
    The former badminton Hall at Guillemard Road. (Screengrab: Google Maps)

    And perhaps, more.

    After all, before China started gaining a stronghold in the international badminton scene, during the days of Wong Peng Soon, Southeast Asian nations were (and still are) a force to reckon with in the sport.
     

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  14. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    CURRENTLY TRENDING: UNCOMMON GIANT SLAYERS OF BADMINTON

    The Chinese women, in particular, cemented an indestructible status in the sport from the turn of the 21st century. Winning consecutive Uber Cups, World Championships and Olympic gold medals, an all-Chinese women's singles final was also the usual order of the day at major badminton events.

    But today, that Great Wall of China in women's badminton is but convincingly dismantled.

    The World Championship’s women’s singles gold medal has now eluded China for six consecutive years. At the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, China went home empty-handed in the women's singles event - a sight that would be unthinkable a decade ago.

    It was the result of a consistent effort by a group of “Chinese-slayers” in women’s singles hailing from all around the world: Spain, Thailand, India and Japan.

    Born between 1993 and 1995, they each hold a unique style of play, which brought a refreshing revitalisation in women’s badminton. The absence of a deep history or support for badminton in many of their nations also turned them into inspiring trailblazers.

    The most remarkable unifying factor in this group of players is their emergence as a teenage “protégé”, with each carrying an uncommon story.

    Carolina Marin (2014, 2015, 2018 World Champion) is from Huelva, a small town in Spain of barely 150,000 inhabitants. She was dancing flamenco as a child before she decided to play badminton seriously when coach Fernando Rivas spotted her at 14, and then nurtured her into Spain’s first World Champion in badminton by 21.

    [​IMG]
    Spain's Carolina Marin. (File photo: AFP/Johannes EISELE)

    In Thailand, Ratchanok Intanon grew up in a sweets factory in a small Thai province. She became Thailand’s first and the youngest World Champion at 18 back in 2013, and is still a definite medal contender at next year’s Tokyo Olympic Games.

    Badminton legends South Korean Park Joo-bong and India’s Puella Gopichand are known to have raised the standards of badminton in Japan and India respectively.

    As former successful players they became innovative coaches with a good personal touch, and took the sport to another level in their countries.

    They developed their teenage protégés into historic World Champions for their nations - Nozomi Okuhara (in 2017) and P V Sindhu (in 2019).

    TOO LATE, TOO LITTLE FOR YEO?

    Where does that leave Singapore’s Yeo Jia Min?

    For the discerning fans of badminton, Yeo’s recent emergence no longer comes as a “shocker”. The badminton women’s singles event is anybody’s game in this day.

    And for Yeo, there is a lot of catching up to do to threaten the current class of giant slayers. The 20-year-old was defeated by Intanon 17-21, 11-21 in the quarterfinals.

    There is also a long way to go before Singapore badminton can reach those remarkable heights set by Wong Peng Soon during the country’s pre-independence era.

    Perhaps what Singapore needs to ask then is this: If they can do it, why not us?

    [​IMG]
    Yeo Jia Min beat South Korea’s An Se Young to take the women's singles title at the Hyderabad Open. (Photo: Facebook/I Love Badminton)

    READ: Badminton: Singapore's next generation of shuttlers tipped to be 'world class'

    In badminton, despite deep benches in China and Indonesia, Denmark with a population of just over 5 million inhabitants is longstanding proof that a nation does not need a huge population or a deep talent pool to develop a world champion or build a world champion team. (They have successfully done both in badminton.)

    And there could still be late bloomers, too.

    Retired Dane, Tine Baun, is a great case in point where she was often the only real threat to China’s women’s singles dominance when she was in her late-twenties.

    All of these require an unyielding dedication and commitment from their national governing bodies in nurturing and developing talent from their own backyard, despite the odds.


    And like the Schoolings, a persistent belief in a giant-slaying sporting future for their child, and to just take the risk.

    There is no short cut. And if not now, when?

    Jan Lin Lee was formerly Press Officer at the Badminton World Federation before joining the Olympic Channel as Commissioning Editor of Originals and branded content. She is now a Sports Film and Documentaries Producer based in the US

    Source: CNA/sl

    Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/new...minton-foreign-talent-wong-peng-soon-11870732
     

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