Singles players using non-head-heavy rackets

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by Swat, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. Swat

    Swat Regular Member

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    Those of you who have found that you win more singles games using even balanced or head light rackets - does speed compensate for power for you or do you simply get more/better in all areas?
     
  2. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    It's just personal preference, I suppose. You can hardly use the speed of a true head-light or even balanced racket in singles. Maybe a bit on a rare drive duel or deceptive flicks. There's a reason almost all pros use head-heavy stuff - unless you're Hu Yun or Ouseph. Only advantages I see are the lack of fatigue or if it complements your swing style.
     
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  3. Caffrey

    Caffrey Regular Member

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    It really depends on how much whip you're accustomed to putting into your swing. The weight in the head of head-heavy rackets causes the racket to drop after the top of your swing, which basically helps you in the downward motion. It makes swinging at a consistent speed easy. Some players prefer to have more control over their swing speed though, so they opt against head-heavy rackets. There`s more room for error with non head-heavy but greater variation.

    Taufik used even-balanced rackets towards the end of his career.
     
  4. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    There's more room for error with head heavy, not head light... the racket is moving slower for HH, so the racket doesnt travel as far for any timing mistake.
     
  5. Caffrey

    Caffrey Regular Member

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    Since the weight in the head ends up doing more of the swinging for you, it makes for a more consistent swing speed. When you swing a very head heavy racket, the swing is more like "dropping the racket" rather than exertion of force. Its easier to have a constant swing speed when you're letting the racket fall, rather than actually swinging the racket yourself.
     
  6. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    lol? As if you're putting much less effort into the swing either way. Sorry, it's a ridiculuous thing to say that anyone is 'letting the racket fall' because it's HH.
     
  7. Swat

    Swat Regular Member

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    Where do you draw the line for even balance - 280-285 mm, and below that HL?
     
  8. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Around 285 to 290 mm

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
  9. Caffrey

    Caffrey Regular Member

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    It's an exaggeration used to display the effect head-heaviness has on someone's swing. Obviously no one just drops the racket when they swing.

    If you swing an NS9900 and then swing a VTZF you'll see what I mean. The downward portion of the swing using the head-heavy racket is a lot less forced.
     
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  10. Caffrey

    Caffrey Regular Member

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    (accidental post)
     

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