Slicing when Dropping

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Crazypeetee246, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    Fun to do, had a go last night, a reverse cross from me forehand
    I have problems with my footwork...you have to stand very unnatural, and recovering is a struggle..

    now just finding a sucker who actually doesn't see it coming...because your entire body languages says "outta court", wich they sometimes interpret as "cross court" so they generally see it coming..

    not an effective shot..
     
  2. phaarix

    phaarix Regular Member

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    Hmm, yeah unless you're faking to hit out of court, I don't think a cross-court reverse slice from the forehand corner is going to work too well :p.

    BTW I'm so glad this thread was brought up as I'm now using the reverse slice in my game to quite good effect :). A bit of practice and I was right on my way. Also hope to further practice this shot to make it even more effective :D!
     
  3. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    My thoughts exactly.
     
  4. mettayogi

    mettayogi Regular Member

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    I tried hitting forhand cross court drop outward from rear corner of backhand court several times. Some landed halfway btw. service line and net and close to side line. If this is reverse slice, it works very well. My shoulder was right angle to net and it looks more likely I'll drop or clear down the line, but it ended up cross court drop close to net.
     
  5. mettayogi

    mettayogi Regular Member

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    Follow-up shot to cross court sliced drop

    When I'm served high in forehand court in singles, I use sliced cross court drop to good effect. It results in many straight winners. But if the opponent returns a quality straight net shot, I'm usually in trouble:
    • I usually lob straight. If it's not done deep and fast enough, it gives opponent a chance for forehand smash.
    • Lobbing cross court should be effective, but I've trouble doing it well. Not sure if it's because I'm hitting the shot late/low. I have no problem lobbing cross court in other situations.
    • Straight drop-back needs to be very high quality, otherwise it's an easy net kill.
    • Cross court net drop also seems difficult.
    Any suggestions? (other than "don't do cross court sliced drop unless you can run diagonally to net quickly.")
     
  6. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    suggestion: drop straight..if he does a netshot youré there quicker, and do an offensive lob (my favorite shot) to his backhand (wich is right inf ront of you)...

    there's a high chance he in trouble, havign to hit a difficult low backhand shot, probably behind his body...slim chance he can pull off a clear..

    ánd, against 'smarter' opponents cross drops like that are a tad useless. For your opponent it doesnt matter if he ahs to go to his forehand, or backhand, the distance is the same. btu the crossdrop takes mroe time to arrive, easier for him...
    Crossdrops áre effectvie in the middle of the rally, or when you see your opponent taking a step to his backhand..

    try if you can hit your straight dropss a bit faster, and you should be well on your way, I think..
     
  7. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Actually, if he is positioned correctly then the distance to your crosscourt shots will always be greater than to your straight shots.

    But many lazy opponents, after a high serve crosscourt, stay on the same (wrong!) side. In this case, they are not covering the straight shots enough, and a straight drop will be excellent (like jerby said).

    You must watch your opponent's position! Don't assume that he's always in the right place.

    Also, as jerby said, you need to hit your drops with some pace. Crosscourt drops in particular are prone to becoming very "floaty" when hit by beginners/low intermediate players. If they take too long to cross the net, then the opponent has a chance to make a deadly netshot.

    How can you hit with pace without having them travel too far into the court? Slice and reverse slice!
     
  8. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    you mean the opponent taking a step to the sideline?

    yes, I'm sorry...quite an obvious mistake on my side:eek:

    And I'm just a sucker for straight-play, with a sudden cross...keeps the pace high...And gives me an edge when playing against some of those cross-a-rama's out there...
     
  9. hiroisuke

    hiroisuke Regular Member

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    Well, actually, if you're in trouble (out of position, off-balance, bad location), then if you can make a decent one cross-drop, although it means that the birdie is located farther from you, it gives you more time to get set up again. Also, fast drops aren't always the best idea, esp. if it means that it gives you less time to get set and they can drop it faster.
     
  10. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    If you're in trouble, then probably a (straight) clear is better.

    Fast drops may not always be the better type, but they usually are -- at least, against good players.

    Slow drops are dangerous because, if the opponent reaches them early, he can play a very tight netshot.

    The slow drop is a more aggressive shot than the fast drop. Use the slow drop when you think your opponent will be a little late to the shuttle, and taking it well below net height. Potentially, you could force a half-court lift.

    Fast drops don't force a half-court lift, but they do protect you from deadly tight spinning netshot replies.

    The tighter your drop, the tighter his netshot!
     
  11. Crazypeetee246

    Crazypeetee246 Regular Member

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    I've been working on reverse slices and I've run into ANOTHER problem:
    How do you drop straight using reverse slice WITHOUT slowing down your racquet speed? I can't seem to do this :mad: . Is it just a matter of touch or "not putting as much spin" into it? Or do I just need more practice :D ?
     
  12. mettayogi

    mettayogi Regular Member

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    Fast reverse slice drop shot

    My slice drop seems to be faster than reverse slice one. How can I make reverse slice drop equally fast?

    My index finger and racket motion helps to turn racket face inward in a slice drop shot, but turning racket face outward seems less natural. I'm relying on wrist turning outward just before impact, but this requires slowing down racket movement before impact for control, hence slower drop. Is there a better way?
     
  13. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The reverse slice drop shot uses a more horizontal slice and a higher contact point. Being a horizontal slice you can use a stronger slicing action without hitting it overly too high or far. It is similar to a car's windscreen wiper action, or the peeling of an apple or potato skin. The slice drop shot uses a more angular slice and on average has a lower contact point than the reverse slice. Oftentimes the slice cross court is a halfway house-a cut smash or a soft half smash.
    But once you have perfected the reverse slice drop shot, it can be a very formidable weapon, whether done cross court, straight to the left or straight to the right.
     
  14. tubby

    tubby Regular Member

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    What shot are you hitting when you slice.

    Lets us say you want to hit a cross court normal slice drop shot (for a right hander). Are you imagining that you are hitting a medium paced smash to the middle and that with the slice it will take the speed of it and pull it towards the front corner? Or is it a smash down the line with the same effect? Or maybe it isnt a smash, but an attacking clear? What do people imagine they are playing?

    I hope that makes sense. The reason i am asking is that i am lacking consistency at the moment and sometimes when i try to slice it i am over slicing it and it balloons up a bit making for an easy kill.
     
  15. chaoroger

    chaoroger Regular Member

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    Drop Shot? inwards or outwards..

    i think this is how it goes...(btw this graph only applies to right-handers)
    visualize it in ur head, it makes more sense like that..
    1.) Slice inwards, since it looks like ur dropping cross court, but it actually goes straight, slicing outwards makes it obvious it'll go straight, or otherwise it'll go out
    2.) Slice outwards, since it'll look like ur hitting straight, but it goes crosscourt, not slice inward since the movement will make it obvious
    3.)Slice inwards, since it'll look like ur hitting straight, but it goes crosscourt, not slice outward since the bird is going that direction, and it'll make the shot obvious
    4.) Slice outward, since it'll look like a crosscourt, but goes straight

    In other words, in hitting to corners, slice away from whereever ur hitting. From the middle, i guess it just depends on whatevers more comfortable.
     

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  16. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    curve four can also be curved the other way, by reverse slicing..
    and #3 is irrational, you'll ahve to slice, and fake a hit to the wall..Best you reverse slice it, wich amke it curve the other way..

    But not the curves aren't really like that...the true effect is onyl seen by a rapid deaccelartion, not mid-air bending...I think...
     
  17. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Yes, that is a good summary.

    In your terms, "slice inwards" = "reverse slice", and "slice outwards" = "slice".

    Paths #1 and #3 are actually curving the wrong way, but otherwise it's pretty accurate. The curve on straight drops is much less than on crosscourt drops.

    Actually, the shuttle does follow a curved path with a heavily sliced dropshot. It's easier to see your opponent's curving drops; I see this quite often when I play against some of the better players at my club.
     
  18. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    sliced or reversed? will check closer tomorrow...never really gave it that much thought..
     
  19. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Either, but I'd guess it's more common for slice. Any time you slice a dropshot, it will curve. The curve is most noticeable for very heavy crosscourt slices (i.e. superb crosscourt slow drops).

    The curving crosscourts can be hard to track sometimes!
     
  20. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    For the cross-court slice, I begin the stroke as I would with a down the line full smash. However, instead of pronating my forearm at contact, I just keep my forearm neutral to cut across the bird. Note that my arm speed does not slow down.

    For the straight slice, I begin the stroke the same way as a crosscourt smash. At contact, I supinate my forearm to slice the bird and send it straight.

    For the reverse slices, I begin the stroke the same way I would with a half-smash (slower hip and shoulder rotation, sudden forearm pronation before contact). At some point, my grip shifts towards panhandle (more panhandle, more cut on bird) but I still pronate my forearm. The pronation itself is enough to hit the reverse slice over (usually we teach the reverse slice by having the student stand stationary with an arm up in the air simply making a "windshield wiper" motion to get the shot across). Of course, the reverse slice is more deception with extra body rotation, so we get them to start doing that once they become more comfortable with the basic reverse slice motion.
     

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