Slicing when Dropping

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Crazypeetee246, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. tubby

    tubby Regular Member

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    That's great - thanks for that stumblingfeet:)
     
  2. jeremyv

    jeremyv New Member

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    Okay... I'm so confused

    For a right hander, is a slice = brushing/wiping the shuttle from your left to right or is it right to left if it is in your forehand?

    Because gollum said that by doing a slice, you add more to the natural spin of the shuttle. Then he said if the feathers were overlapped in the opposite direction, slicing (is he referring to brushing here?) from a left to right direction is more effective. So I guess the right to left direction would be more effective in a "normal" shuttle meaning that brushing in a right to left direction refers to slice and not to reverse slice? (BTW, for me, a right-handed person, playing a reverse slice in my forehand would be more natural and definitely easier than playing a slice forehand).

    Does it mean that as the shuttle approaches me (with me facing it), it would seem as it is spinning in a right-to-left direction (assuming it falls vertically)? I really don't understand the point of saying that a shuttle spins in a CCW direction because it's totally different from your opponent's point of view. When somebody says it spins in a CCW direction is it based from my point of view as the shuttle approaches me cork-first or is it based from the hitter's point of view as the shuttle leaves his/her racket (meaning that the feathers are nearer to him/her than the cork).

    In another topic, SystemicAnomaly said that the results will be more dramatic if you counteract the natural spin. Does anyone agree? Why is this so?

    Do I make any sense???
     
    #62 jeremyv, Aug 9, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2008
  3. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    There are many ways to slice the shuttlecock so as long as the slice works it doesn't matter.
     
  4. jeremyv

    jeremyv New Member

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    Thanks for the prompt reply phandrew. Well yeah, I do know that there are many ways you can slice a shuttle. But just to set things straight... which is which. Is the forehands slice brushing from right to left or from left to right? I'll keep my question that simple.
     
  5. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Drop shots can be taken high or lower at shoulder height. They can be sliced or hit with no slice. Slicing is always better because it brings in a new dimension to the game-deception in the form of an arm movement that tells the opponent it is going one way and at one speed whilst the shuttle does the opposite by going slower, changes direction, flight trajectory, and lands nearer the net. The arm movement of the drop should be similar to when doing a clear to maintain the desired deception. Sliced drops can be fast or slow, the former landing further and the latter nearer and more vertically. Sliced drops can be straight or coss-court. From the back right hand corner a cross-court sliced drop is hit with a left to right slice at an angle to the net. At the left hand back corner a cross-court drop is hit with a right to left reverse slice action angled for that cross-court target. A straight drop is usually hit with a reverse sliced drop, with the racquet face square to the net, as reverse sliced staright drop is more deceptive.
    Sliced drops from the back taken at shoulder height, when forced to, can also be very effective, much more so than the tell-tale drop without any slice, as the latter will be easily picked out by your opponent who will give you a nasty welcome party at the net.
     
  6. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    it really depends on the angle of your body compared to the court when you do the slice.
     
  7. footimy

    footimy Regular Member

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    Try this...when you do a cross court slice from the forehand side corner, change your grip to backhand grip and do it as if u wanna smash straight. You will see a very sharp and deceptive drop shot. I've done this technique since I was 11, almost everyone felt for these shot.
     
  8. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Can you elaborate on this? Drop shots, whether taken with or without slice, are played like a clear action to ensure drops are deceptive. What has the body angle relative to the court (which part of the court?) got to do with this?
     
  9. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Yes, fast drops are played like a smash, but slow drops should be played like a clear, to have an element of deception.
     
  10. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    Say you're standing parallel with the side lines. The slice shots will be different if you were parallel with the base lines.
     
  11. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Whether you do a sliced or reverse-sliced drop is not dependent on the feet positions you mentioned above. A normal sliced drop shot's movement is from left to right; a reverse sliced drop is from the right to the left. It has noting to do with your feet position, which I will explain below. Drop shots can be fast or slow; they can be straight or cross-court, and cross-court drops are angled whereas straight drops are hit square to the racquet face.
    Now the feet position.
    All overhead, including all overhead drops, and under-arm strokes follow this feet positioning:
    1. Forehand : Feet at 45% to the net, with the left about 18" ahead of the right.
    2. Backhand: The position is reversed with the right foot ahead of the left.
    All side-arm shots (drives and even drops) follow this feet positioning:
    1. Forehand : The feet, some 9" apart, are parallel to the net, with the left foot some 18" nearer the side line than the right.
    2. Backhand : The right foot is across in a similar position.
    For the overhead drops the feet should never be parallel with the baselines. How in the world can you play an overhead drop with such a feet position?
     
  12. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Can you explain in more detail how this is done? Are you saying that the forehand cross drop is played with a backhand stroke?
     
  13. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    I am surprised you are asking this question... :p A 40+ year old technique widely employed at least by the Chinese players in the 60's....
     
  14. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Yes, it is a strange stroke for me-a forehand cross-court drop shot (fast or slow?) played with a backhand. I can understand its use in drives and pushes-I am very strong in this area-but with a drop shot from the forehand? Perhaps you can explain?
     
  15. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    I am absolutely sure that you are strong in drives and pushes, and not only ... But I would advise a careful reading of the original posting before making assumptions ;)
     
  16. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Can you pls quote the "original posting"? If this is the first post of this thread then I think you are talking about an entirely different thing.
    The starter of this thread asks about the "inwards" and "outwards" slicing movement of drop shots. This is often referred to as the reverse slice and the normal slice, respectively. So far, there is no problem here.
    What I question is Footimy's use of a backhand stroke to do a forehand cross drop. Such a drop from the forehand side is a forehand stroke, not a backhand. I would like to see how a forehand cross drop shot can be executed with a backhand-I don't think it makes sense.
     
  17. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    Well, I meant to go and read the posting that is confusing you, that is Footimy's one. ;)
     
  18. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

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    i think he's trying to say he is using a backhand GRIP. most likely the one where you place your thumb along the fattest bevel. what he said does actually make sense. to prevent hitting the shuttle out on the forehand side, you favour a more backhanded grip, just as to keep the shot in on the backhand rear court, you go more pan handled.
     
  19. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    Hm, is this something similar to the slice-drop I sometimes use ?
    I use the backhand-grip and slice the shuttle with the backhand side of the racquet, but I use a forehand stroke. It often deceives my opponents to move to the wrong side, for they assume that the shuttle will travel from right-to-left ( from my view as a right hander ), but it actually goes towards the right or just travels straight at a really steep angle due to the slice.
     
  20. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

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    no, don't think so. it's just a normally struck shot. the only difference is by adjusting the grip to be more backhand bias, you impart a slicing action. it can either be just small enough to prevent the shot from going too wide, especially if you are rushed and strike it not fully in front of you. alternatively, you can put more slice into it to send it crosscourt.

    however, i don't see the difference between the backhand side of the racquet and the front. isn't a racquet meant to be symmetrical?
     

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