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Smash contact/impact point

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Lim Zi Chao, May 28, 2019.

  1. Lim Zi Chao

    Lim Zi Chao Regular Member

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    First of all, alil background.

    I had been playing badminton for >20 years. Highest achievement was state representative.

    I specialize in backcourt, and power jump smash is my forte.

    However, I couldn't produce the same cracking sound in power smash and the power/speed of my smashes were not as good as i wanted them to be, and so i explored further.

    There were a few research points that i tried to validate and confirm:
    1. Preparation phase: to reduce the elbow vs forearm angle. Refer to photo 1
    Results: no significant difference

    2. Supination of wrist before the pronation (no photos).
    Results: worse smash

    3. Impact point:
    I had been taught to aim for the shuttlecock in front of my field of view. Therefore, the impact point had always been inline with the center of my body. I had made an extensive analysis on professionals smashes impact point, and i reached to a conclusion:
    For a smash from a good straight lift, the jump and impact point has to be at the right side of the body.
    I had always known that the impact point has to be slightly towards the right (racket hand), but when i checked frame by frame, it turned out to be more than i thought it to be. Refer photo 2 for a comparison of the legend, JJS, vs mine.

    And so i tried to adjust, and i made a video comparison side by side.
    *since i couldnt upload the video comparison, i will use the side by side screenshot to show the difference.

    The results:
    MUCH louder and crisp sound, and much steeper and faster smash

    I'd like to share this finding to the community here, as i bliv most, if nt all players, always hope to find an edge towards a bigger/stronger smash.
     

    Attached Files:

    khoai, Mason, LenaicM and 1 other person like this.
  2. Lim Zi Chao

    Lim Zi Chao Regular Member

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    Made a comparison with Goh V Shem straight smash, and the impact point/arm angle seemed to be matching.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Just put that video up on Youtube and share the link in here. I would be really interested to see what you've put together there. Also, it matches my own observation that you get a far better and more fluent kinetic chain going once the shuttle is more out to the side or at least in a straight line above the shoulder joint.
     
    buibui2 likes this.
  4. Mason

    Mason Regular Member

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    thank you for this post! its very helpful
     
  5. Lim Zi Chao

    Lim Zi Chao Regular Member

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    Good idea. Just did as u suggested.
    You may find the video here:

     
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  6. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Hi there

    Most of the valid points are here. Despite this is a jumping smash, the content explained in regards with the topic of impact point will still be the same if one does it without jumping. However let me add a few things especially for newbies that starts to practice smashing.

    Having said about the impact point here, learning to continue your swinging arc forward after contact has been made at the impact point with a very good follow through is also very important as well. This is because, by having a good follow through (whereby your racket arm should continuously swing in a follow through arc in a smooth forward trajectory), will maintain your swinging speed which will eventually give you that necessary maximum force for a solid smash when impact occurred . To acquire a good follow through during and after contact has being made, one must be hitting "THROUGH"' the shuttlecock while completing his swinging arc and then his racket arm should come to a rest crossing his body.

    SS
     
    buibui2 and Mason like this.
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Would it be the same for doubles and singles?

    Singles you have to be prepared to run forward so maybe it’s not so helpful in that situation.

    BTW, for those unused to the action and trying it out, go easy first. Don’t injure your shoulder.
     
    LenaicM likes this.
  8. Lim Zi Chao

    Lim Zi Chao Regular Member

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    Agreed with the point. The basics of a swing, "preparation, leading the swing with elbow, pronation of the forearm", all has to be mastered before even attempting to make any adjustments to impact points.

    What i'm sharing here is for those intermediate level players.

    *Regarding follow through, this i have mixed feelings. by theory, following through is required after each stroke, but the end of the movement will have to depend on the position of the stroke, jump smash in particular.

    Many times, the will be half stroke, where the stroke ended after pronation, when the smash is taken at the far forehand side. Also, the follow through movement for different players will be different as well. Try comparing Goh V Shem's strokes, often end up as a short stroke without follow through. Fu Hai Feng's strokes are more complete. But both produced monster smashes.

    All in all, there are many many variables in producing a super smash, and each player needs to find what works best for him/her by experimenting (Once the basics are mastered).
     
    buibui2 likes this.
  9. Lim Zi Chao

    Lim Zi Chao Regular Member

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    There wont be any difference in terms of the landing. You can see in the video comparison that i landed and body moved forward after both jump smashes.

    However, in terms of application, I believe you will have less time for positioning in singles compared to doubles, so the chances of "hitting it right where you want to" will be lower as compared to doubles when you are actually expecting a lift when your partner sets a good netshot for you. :)
     
    Cheung likes this.
  10. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    The technique will still be the same applied to both double and single. After completing the follow through and ending your smash by landing with your racket crossed and your racket leg in front ( a scissor jump), this legs position in fact are the correct preparation stance that is needed in order for your next footwork movement to do that follow up hit
     

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