Spotter needed

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Amplified, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    Hi I want to improve my gameplay and I need people to analyse it to realise mistakes that I couldnt see, I will try to post videos of my gameplays here every week, please enlighten me!
     
  2. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    [video=youtube;R1sEdlMWoH0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1sEdlMWoH0&feature=youtu.be[/video]

    Please note that the players in the video have not gone through much proper training, so go easy on them, as for me (the guy in blue) feel free to point out as many mistakes as you can and advice me on how I can improve.
     
  3. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    [video=youtube;o_t0uFxyEd0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_t0uFxyEd0[/video]

    Please note that the players in the video have not gone through much proper training, so go easy on them, as for me (the guy with red shoes) feel free to point out as many mistakes as you can and advice me on how I can improve.
     
  4. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    [video=youtube;drrUnPhqN4Y]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drrUnPhqN4Y&feature=youtu.be[/video]
    Last video for this week, all 3 videos are played on different days
     
  5. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    As your level of play is not that high, it's hard to give you specific detailed advice.

    If you really want to improve considerably, I would recommend you to go to a club where they have a trainer and start learning proper technique and work on all areas of the game. Just playing with beginners will not help you much.
     
  6. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    Thanks for the advice, however the problem is that i do not have money to join a club or training so i need to self train, i guess i will do some basic footwork training to start off first
     
  7. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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  8. dontmakeme

    dontmakeme Regular Member

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    I recommend you learn to split step and footwork.
    It isn't badminton until you split step
     
  9. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    Thanks for the information!
     
  10. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    I'm quite a low-level player (second-to-lowest division in Germany) and coach(second-to-lowest certificate in Germany) myself, but I'll try to analyze, game by game.

    In the first game, your opponents are playing everything to your partner. It may be more representative to show us a game where you are the weakest player on court, or at least a level doubles (preferably against really strong opponents).

    You correctly note that the incoming serves are often easy targets to attack. However, right at love all, your technique looks peculiar. So your opponent has served and you want to attack. What do you do?

    [​IMG]

    First of all, we see that you have lowered your racket quite a bit already. This cannot possibly be a neutral shot. But way more importantly, look at you feet! The shuttle is coming in, your right foot is still on the ground, but your left is hovering! If you just push with your right foot, you can easily attack those shots. At other times, it's not that noticable (and a little rotation of the left foot is fine).

    I believe a contributing factor is that the inside of the left shoe goes toward your opponent instead of to your backline, although that should really only affect flick serves. I couldn't find a great picture, but here's a screenshot:

    [​IMG]

    Often, the left foot is rotated even more inwards.

    As others have said, work on your footwork. When going to the front or sides, you often stumble after/during hitting. On the other hand, going to backwards and hitting seems to be your strong suit.

    When you are in front, your racket is often at knee or even ground height, meaning you will be unable to intercept/attack any short or flat shots. Compare:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Note that a pro's racket is up already when their partner is hitting, since you have little time to move it up after when the smash is being defended.

    I'll look at the other videos in separate posts.
     
    #10 phihag, Aug 11, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
  11. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    In game 2 you seem to have wrist pain or discomfort early on. Make sure to warm up properly, and if you are in pain, look at your technique with a coach and seek out a doctor!

    You now have two opponents with even weaker (forehand) serves, but your left hop costs you too much time to attack it effectively:

    [​IMG]

    I didn't write it before, but a lot of mistakes may stem from the play style of your partner, who clears way too much (but then again, his technique may need improving so he can master a consistent smash or drop). When he's hitting the shuttle from the back court, you rarely get into a forcing attack.

    Again, your opponents have figured this out and take you out of the game. They correctly prefer playing a short cross clear to your partner than a proper longline clear to you.

    Your backhand smash is really impressive by the way. I know this is supposed to be about you, but look at your partner's racket:

    [​IMG]

    I'm sorry, but I don't see any new points in the second video. I'll go on to the third with hopes of seeing an improved partner ;)
     
    #11 phihag, Aug 11, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
  12. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    The guy in red at the start has the correct footwork for receiving, although his racket is too low. Note the motion blur and lack thereof of his feet:

    [​IMG]

    You have a different partner! This one's technique is better, although he constantly seems sleepy. Maybe do some core strength exercises and motivational training with him?

    The warm-up in game 3 seems quite short to me. While the pros do warm up for exactly 2 minutes as well, note that that's just to get used to the court. They always warm up for at least 10 minutes and often way more, typically starting with a light general-body warm up (running). Also, the selection of shots seems quite unfocused. Note that you never go over either doubles service line.

    Again, the low racket. This is you after serving:

    [​IMG]

    This is Christina Pedersen after serving.

    Before, I wondered what would happen if the opponents flick you. These opponents do, and the result:

    [​IMG]

    Now your right foot is hopping while you rotate your left. The movement afterwards looks quite good, but you lose precious time with this hop.

    This is you going forward after a flat smash:

    [​IMG]

    Can you guess what happens next?

    [​IMG]

    The opponents return a flat drive, but you are unable to hit it because your racket is way too low for such a fast game. Also, for a flat shot, the backswing is too large, and your partner motions you as such.

    When smashing, you need to balance out your right leg moving forward with a left leg moving backward. Conversely, your left arm should go to the side or back, not the front of your body. This looks like a recipe for injury upon landing, or at least a long scramble until you'll be able to return the next shuttle:

    [​IMG]

    Landing (one shot after):

    [​IMG]

    I'll leave you with a final low racket picture ;). Just after serving short:

    [​IMG]

    I hope this helps. It would be interesting to see a game with a better partner or a singles match.
     
    #12 phihag, Aug 11, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
  13. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    omg!! thank you so much for your contribution, you dont know how much it mean to me, you are really a spot on for some of the points, how could u tell that i have wrist pain?!! but i will try to work on the stuff you pointed out though i am resting for this week due to the wrist injury
     
  14. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    i watched the part about this point again 07:38 , isnt that little hop considered a split step? forgive me but i dont know much about split steps so please enlighten :)
     
  15. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    i think that moment is at 07:03 but i think that it is also split step..
     
  16. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    If pros want to cover a large distance and don't know the direction beforehand (say after playing a clear in singles), they stand with both feet somewhat side by side. If they'd just take a step, they wouldn't have enough momentum to get to their destination, so they start by shifting weight in the opposite direction. There are three options to do this:

    • In a quick start, you shift weight with one foot to the opposite direction. For example, if you want to go to front right, the weight should be towards the back on the left foot.
    • Another option is jumping upwards, and and then landing with the correct feet position, called a start hop.
    • However, jumping upwards shifts your center of mass, and that's bad. If the upward jump is really tiny however, and you land with feet further apart, then you get all the benefits but still stay low. It's called a split step because the feet split apart.

    Split steps require not only excellent anticipation, physique, motor control, and may thus not be appropriate to beginners, where it's more important to see any coordinated movement at all.

    In any case, the receive situation is special:

    • The court is way smaller
    • There are just two directions to go (usually)
    • The shuttle is coming from a negative (below-the-net) position
    • The receiver has plenty of time for preparation

    In this situation, a split step can be done - but before the server is ready. If you already start with the correct foot position, you don't need to move into it.

    In any case, what you are doing is a hop, but with only one side - and the one that's not as important to boot. The hop has no purpose when you go to the front, and allows you to rotate the incorrectly positioned left foot when you go to the back. There doesn't seem to be any weight shifting.
     
    #16 phihag, Aug 11, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
  17. captivated

    captivated Regular Member

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    off topic here... is the red guy playing with the sketchers on? how is he going to move around the court with that since the sole is so spongy.. perhaps he may even hurt his ankle
     
  18. Amplified

    Amplified Regular Member

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    you will be surprised of other weird footwears i see people wear
     
  19. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    I see you walk around on court too much. When a rally begin, you need to be constantly in ready state. This means keeping both knees bent, upper body leaning forward more, racket high and in front of you.

    Without proper posture, you won't be able to move fast, and you'd most likely be late taking any returns from opponents.

    I'd also suggest you read the other recent thread about the front player's positioning. Read it, and compare with what you have been doing.

    Get the above going first. And maybe in a few months upload another video of yours.
     

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