The hottest chillies

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by taneepak, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I would like to find where you can get the hottest chillies. I am a chiilies nut and would not let a day pass without eating at least 2 tablespoon of chillies. The hottest ones I have come across are the very small chillies (chilli puddi?) they eat in Malaysia and Thailand, and also the extreme hot variety of the Indian Vindaloo dishes. As a comparison, the hot Tabasco Habenero sauce is considered normal hot, slightly less hot than chilli puddies. Lately I came across a medium size chilli, yellow in colour, on Hainan island, China; and boy, I can swear that it is much hotter than the much smaller chilli puddies. I brought back 7 jars of this yellow chilli sauce, and none of many friends, save one, can handle it. The Hainan yellow chilli sauce would beat the hot Tabasco habanero sauce and the chilli puddies by a wide margin.
    Can anyone suggest other equally hot varieties?
     
  2. Dave18

    Dave18 Regular Member

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    I can't recommend you anything because I don't know much about chillies but your story is interesting.

    So tell us, do you sweat like a pig when you eat the hot chillies? :D Does it give you tummy aches?

    I'm definitely not a person who likes chillies, the hottest thing I tried was some tobasco sauce and it burned my tongue and made me sweat like never before and then I had a stomach ache. Lol. :crying:
     
  3. aiyuuw

    aiyuuw Regular Member

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    you know, here they have quite vast selections of chillies, we call it 'sambal', i discovered this sambal when i was going out with some pals called 'sambal gila' or 'crazy chilli' and it was awful, my friend was stubborn he had been warned that it was wwaay hot, and just 1/4 teaspoon was enough to make him crazy (and sweating) but he took 2 spoonful of it instead, and he started to appear redder, and sweating a lot, believe, it wasnt pretty, but u might want to try it


    i havent tried it tho
     
  4. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    In Indonesia and Malaysia they eat lots of sambal blachan, a spicy sauce made from red dried chillies and prawn paste, and it is to rice or hokkien mee what butter is to bread. It is hot but definitely not as hot as chilli puddi or vindaloo sauce.
     
  5. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I don't sweat eating most chillies, only slightly when the weather is very hot. No, it doesn't give me tummy aches. However, the first time I tried to eat a teaspoonful of Hainan yellow chiili sauce, supreme hot category, I did feel a tinge of fire down my digestive system.
    I have found a way to neutralize the fiery hotness in chillies but it takes the fun and taste out of chillies.
     
  6. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    Palm sugar or even white sugar. If you feel the tongue is burning, put a bit of sugar (palm or white or brown sugar) over the burning area of the tongue.
     
  7. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I haven't tried sugar but it would take some time for the sugar to melt.
     
  8. wood_22_chuck

    wood_22_chuck Regular Member

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    By the way, it's cili padi, or Thai Birds-Eye Chillies. :D

    -dave
     
  9. Quasimodo

    Quasimodo Regular Member

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  10. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    Nah, not really. If you want it to melt fast, palm sugar is the way since it melts much faster than the ordinary white sugar :)
     
  11. bigredlemon

    bigredlemon Regular Member

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    Does it bother you when you take care of #2? I eat some mildly spicy foods and it always makes me feel like i'm :eek:ing fire.
     
  12. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Have you tried Shezchuan pepper hotpot? Or even some spicy Shezchuan dishes where the dish is 90% hot dried chillies and only 10% the real dish/meal? It is extremely hot and is something not even Thais or Malaysians or Indians can handle. The first time I tried it in a genuine Shezchuan restaurant in China, I was floored, and I thought this couldn't be, being almost knocked out by a new spicy food when all the locals showed no signs of distress. I then found out the secret on how they easily handled it. They use a sauce consisting of sesame oil and crushed raw garlic, which coats your tongue, mouth and your whole digestive system, and it acts both as a barrier and a neutralizer to the chillies. You can try this at home. It works. So next time you try Shezchuan hotpot, do make use of the sauce that is customarily laid out on the table, and you can then even beat the locals. :D
     
  13. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    HAH. REAL MEN TAKE IT WITHOUT THE BARRIERS! MUAHAHAHA. A Bit mcp today :p
     
  14. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I have taken many champion Malaysian chilli eaters to Shezchuan restaurants in Shenzhen, China to test their chilli tolerance. So far they are cried and screamed. After this customery introduction I then brought in the sesame oil and garlic lifesaver. Very wicked of me. Shezchuan chillies do not actually taste like chillies. They taste almost exactly like fiery peppers and their hotness deadens and numbs your whole mouth. Very unlike the chillies the rest of the world knows.
     
  15. Neil Nicholls

    Neil Nicholls Regular Member

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    From http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...hil08.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/05/08/ixhome.html
    I like the bit about getting drunks out of his bar

    "We live in an extreme world," explains Blair Lazar, a hot sauce creator. "And I make extreme foods.' In his hands is the hottest spice in the world, an ultra-refined version of chilli powder so fiery that customers must sign a waiver absolving him of any liability if they are foolish enough to try it.

    Locked in a crystal flask sealed with wax and a tiny skull, Mr Lazar's mouth-blistering concoction is pure capsaicin - the chemical that lends habanero and jalapeno peppers their thermo nuclear heat.

    His "16 Million Reserve", which is released to the public this week, is the holy grail of hot sauces, the hottest that chemistry can create.

    It is 30 times hotter than the spiciest pepper, the Red Savina from Mexico, and 8,000 times stronger than Tabasco sauce. To put the tiniest speck on the tip of your tongue is to experience "pure heat", Mr Lazar says.

    Although capsaicin does not actually burn - it fools your brain into thinking that you are in pain by stimulating nerve endings in your mouth - some medical experts believe that it could kill an asthmatic or hospitalise a user who touched his eyes or other sensitive parts of the anatomy.

    ...

    The eye-watering qualities of peppers are measured in internationally recognised Scoville units, developed by Wilbur Scoville, an American chemist who, in 1912, asked tasters to evaluate how many parts of sugar water it took to neutralise capsaicin heat.

    Today, capsaicin content is measured in parts per million, using a process known as high-performance liquid chromatography; one part being equivalent to 15 Scoville units. Benign bell peppers rate zero Scoville units and the Red Savina entered Guinness World Records at 570,000 units.

    Pure capsaicin, meanwhile, has a heat score of 16 million units - inspiring the name for Mr Lazar's latest creation. Each of the 999 limited-edition bottles, priced at $199 (£105), contains just a few crystals. The powder is so strong, however, that Mr Lazar estimates that it would have to be dissolved in 250,000 gallons of water before it could no longer be tasted.

    His career as a hot sauce creator began when he found that the best way to clear drunks out of his seaside bar was to give them free chicken wings dipped in an eye-watering home-made hot sauce.
     
  16. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I think pure capsaicin is not found naturally in any chilli plant. It is extracted from the hot parts of the chilli. By itself it would not have the beautiful complex taste/aroma of a fresh cili padi. That is how Indians make their spicey vindaloo dishes. If you want extreme hot vindaloo they just put in more capsaicin.
    The Thais believe the hotter the chillies one can handle the more virile he or she is. This is what some Thai ladies told me. :D
     
  17. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    What I meant earlier was that no chilli pod is pure 100% capsaicin, which is foundly mainly around the seeds.
     
  18. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    I'll dedicate my life to conquer this feat!!! Muahahaha. Badminton will help me train for it :D:D
     
  19. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Fend, you must try a real Shezchuan restaurant, but it must be in China. Those you find in Hong Kong are not the real MaCoys. The real ones have beautiful girls announcing your arrival with words and song of welcome and hand clapping. As you walk to your table, you watch what the other diners are eating and you wonder how could they posiibly eat such stuff-every dish covered with mountains of dried red chillies. These restaurants are quite upmarket but surprisingly inexpensive in Szhenchen, because they have not been spoiled by high-spending Hong Kong diners who will never go there to eat such self-torture inducing meals.
     
  20. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Wood_22_Chuck, Growler and myself will try out an authentic Sichuan restaurant in Richmond, BC, Canada. The chef is ranked 3rd in Chengdu, Sichuan, in culinary championship. Photos of the food will be posted next week, but there will be no sweaty men on fire :D.
     

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