Tips on selecting a racquet & strings

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by AJ Mike, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. AJ Mike

    AJ Mike New Member

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    This is my first post on any forum so, I welcome any and every suggestion including about tips on how to post / best practices.
    • I play on weekends and currently due to the long gap in my level would not be beginner but not intermediate as well.

    • As far as my style goes, I have weak shoulders so my smashing power is on the lower end so I would call my style more of defensive.

    • I prefer a fairly durable racket but not compromising weight or maneuverability or ability to play delicate shots.

    • I would keep my budget between $100 - $200.

    • Lastly which strings would be ideal given my level, style and requirements. I understand some of these would be also based on individual preference but nevertheless please share your thoughts and reasons for the recommendations.
     
  2. gionna

    gionna New Member

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    Hi!

    You might want a head-heavy racket to improve your smashing power. The Yonex voltric series has a lot of good head-heavy rackets (Mine is a Voltric Z-force II and Votric 80 also has great reviews) On the other hand, if you want to focus more on what you're already good at which is defense, then, a balanced lightweight racket is more preferable since you can have faster swings. Yonex nanoray series has good selection.

    In terms of durability, well, that would depend on how you handle your racket and other factors like string type, tension, etc since most rackets are made from the same type of material: High-modulus graphite. It's a composite material where carbon nanoparticles are dispersed into a polymer matrix (eg epoxy).

    Regarding the string specifications, thinner strings would produce more vibrations so it would give a more crisp hitting sound. Be careful though if you have a strong arm and the string tension is high (if you prefer faster plays) because thinner can also mean a less durable string. If the racket has microcracks or any stress concentrator, it might fracture instantaneously and warp the entire head.

    If you want more control over your shots, you can manipulate the string tension to be lower. Higher tension means that the string bed will deform less when the shuttle hits it, thus, the shuttle will leave the bed immediately after collision. If you have lower tension, the string bed has more room for deformation and the shuttle has longer time to rest on the string bed giving you a better control on how you want to play your shot.

    Hope this helps! :)
    Good luck in finding a racket!
     
  3. AJ Mike

    AJ Mike New Member

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    Awesome Giona, thank you very much for the tips!
     
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  4. Monopoly

    Monopoly New Member

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    gionna and visor like this.
  5. AJ Mike

    AJ Mike New Member

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    Very good read and helpful, thank you!
     
  6. LordGopu

    LordGopu Regular Member

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    As a beginner/intermediate, you're probably not going to want a racket over medium stiffness. So no ZF2 lol.

    Also, most of the power in badminton comes from forearm pronation (forehand overhead shots) and supination (for backhand overheads) so even with a head light racket you should be able to clear the full length of the court if technique is correct. If you're going to pick head light vs head heavy, it should probably be based more on whether you play doubles or singles. If you only play doubles, you might find an even balanced or head light racket makes things easier.
     
  7. AJ Mike

    AJ Mike New Member

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    Thanks LordGopu, gonna keep it in mind when selecting the right racquet
     
  8. justin.lim

    justin.lim Regular Member

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    Hi Mike. Here is my 5 cents worth.

    I would start by suggesting that you try out your friends rackets first during your weekly sessions to get an actual feel on what may suit you best. I am sure that a lot of us done our fair share of research before buying our first high end racket, and it would be safe to say that the majority us ended up finding or buying a different racket that suits us better at the end.

    However if you must choose something, my suggestion is to go for the yonex arc saber 11 which is a even balance + med-stiff shaft. I personally find that the arc11 as a very well rounded racket that is easy to handle and gives a good amount of power for attacking plays.

    As for string type/tension, I would suggest starting with bg66ultimax @ 24 lbs, and work your way upwards or downwards from there.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers - Justin!


    Cheers!
     

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