TOTAL BWF WORLD Championships 2018 : Quarterfinal to FINAL (03-05 August)

Discussion in '2018 Tournaments' started by CLELY, Aug 2, 2018.

  1. yuquall

    yuquall Regular Member

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    In most cases the ones who feel sad and whine are not the players but always some obsessed fans/supporters who can't seem to let go.
     
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  2. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    If you don't understand why ppl want to become World champions despite the WC offering no prize money I think you don't understand competition. It's not about winning money. It's about winning the big titles. Proving you're the best. Since no one can be in peak shape 12 months a year, it's natural to look for the big events if you want to see who really is the best - performing under pressure is another factor in determining the greats. It's easy to perform well when it's one of 15 events you play in the year, when it's the one you prepared for intensely and focused on for months, it's suddenly a different situation.
    Given how the WC doesn't take place in OLY years, I don't think it makes much of a difference to hold it only in uneven years, would reduce the number of events by 33%, sure, but who seriously says "who cares about this sh*t, it takes place every years"...one attempt per year is not a lot if you consider the length of pro careers, add on that they have to qualify as well (which they won't do every single year of their career) and suddenly the average pro doesn't have a lot of WC attempts.
    I think the frequency is fine as it is. Peaking once a year isn't too much to ask from the players, and the break between the All England and the WC is big enough that you can ramp down and rest a bit after the AE and get back to top Form for the WC.
     
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  3. stanleyfm

    stanleyfm Regular Member

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    The problem is with the scheduling

    There are TUC/SC and IO in the middle of these 2
     
  4. vozer here

    vozer here Regular Member

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  5. Yoji

    Yoji Regular Member

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    So do you think TaufikHidayat is better than LeeChongWei? In my opinion, these are also top 15 events. top top events where all people in the world play and 1 WC is just make it 16 events altogether. + 1 SSF which is very important as well.
     
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  6. Anks

    Anks Regular Member

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    I dunno who referring this question to mate..However,I believe Taufik Hidayat being a amazing player isnt like Too better or lesser than LCW...I guess both are like unique in their own ways and both are remembered with their own set of skills and achievements.But TH definitely has an Upper hand in career.

    Though I believe both have like 4WC medals and Also Olympic ones but its just that Taufik has an upper hand cause he got 1 OLY GOLD and 4 Wc including a Gold which LCW's 4WC silver and bronze and 3OLY Silver cant equate to.
    But,yeah LCW's consistency in getting medals is what has made him stay in light and be more popular than TH i guess.

    So,IMO, TH - GREATEST LCW - GREAT,

    Whts ur thoughts though ?
     
  7. yuquall

    yuquall Regular Member

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    I think the one who gained the most from this WC is Malaysia. Who would have thought that LCW's withdrawal could have been a blessing in disguise. Maybe LCW needs to step aside once in a while in order to let the others to emerge from the shadow and be visible without being bombarded with criticisms when they didn't perform too well.
     
  8. Yoji

    Yoji Regular Member

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    To be honest, if TH or LD were to be in Final of Indonesia/China Open, i dont think they will have the reception that LCW had. After experiencing it first hand, when LCW vs LD at Kuching, i can definitely say that he is legend too. In China/Indonesia, no single athlete is larger than the country but it feels that way when LCW plays. you will see fullhouse, cars parked all over the stadium. It was one unbelievable atmosphere, very lucky to be there that tournament. It was luck of the draw that they met too in Final i guess
     
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  9. Dimon75

    Dimon75 Regular Member

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    There is WC in every kind of sport and it is always valued as a top event along with the Olympics. We definitely need this main event once a year for the top emotions, expectations, speculations and so on. And this event shouldn't be part of World Tour. Otherwise it would be just another tournament.
    And moreover all these draw, luck, team tactics and other stuff - are the implicit parts of this event and that also makes it so exciting! Otherwise it would be boring.
     
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  10. yuquall

    yuquall Regular Member

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    If only BWF could arrange the schedule in a more sympathetic and compassionate way..
     
  11. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    It was a straw fire. Daren Liew is just going to go back to his usual level of performance and go out of tournaments in the first two rounds.
     
  12. yuquall

    yuquall Regular Member

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    He might as well be lol. But it was something. If LCW was around, he wouldn't have played as well as he did and if they faced each other LCW would have eaten him. Malaysia would again say, we knew we only have LCW. :p Oh well, it is up to them what to do with this.

    Somehow I like the idea of CHN team keeping LD around as the big brother who keep his juniors feel reassured and raise self-confidence in the team event without really being involved in it.
     
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  13. vozer here

    vozer here Regular Member

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    https://bwfworldchampionships.bwfba...es-review-total-bwf-world-championships-2018/

    [​IMG]

    MARIN TIMES IT RIGHT – WOMEN’S SINGLES REVIEW: TOTAL BWF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS 2018

    THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 2018

    TEXT BY DEV SUKUMAR | BADMINTONPHOTO

    What is it with major events and Carolina Marin?



    [​IMG]The Spaniard’s title win in Nanjing made her the first Women’s Singles player in history to win three World titles. That, and her Rio Olympics gold medal, have seen her capture the year’s most prestigious title four times in the last five years.

    Interestingly, except for 2015, Marin has never dominated the season. This year, she arrived in Nanjing without a World Tour title to her name; her best being a lone semi-final in six events (apart from the European title). Similarly, in 2016, in the run-up to Rio Marin best was two semi-final performances in four Tour events. In 2014, the year she surprised everyone with her first World title, Marin hadn’t won a Tour event in eight appearances – losing even the Spanish Open final to Scotland’s Kirsty Gilmour.

    What this indicates is that the Spaniard (featured image) has mastered the ability to peak at the year’s standout event – the Olympics and the World Championships. In Nanjing, Marin was in a class of her own, shutting down rivals with ruthless efficiency.

    Thailand’s Busanan Ongbamrungphan might have expected to trouble her in the second round, but Marin steamrolled her 21-9 21-8. Next was Japan’s Sayaka Sato, who was also dispatched in clinical fashion, 21-7 21-13.

    India’s Saina Nehwal was her opponent in the quarter-finals, and most fans would have expected a difficult match for the Spaniard. Marin, however, only seemed to get better with every match, stunning the Indian 21-6 21-11, leading Nehwal to comment that she had never seen Marin play at such a high pace.

    [​IMG]

    China’s He Bingjiao was the only player who would take a game off her; nevertheless, Marin recovered to eventually coast to a 13-21 21-16 21-13 victory. Around an hour after Marin had booked her place in her third World Championships final, familiar rival Pusarla V Sindhu followed her into the title round.

    The Indian had fallen in two major finals, both hard-fought. In Rio she faded out only at the end, while in Glasgow last year, she lost the title to Nozomi Okuhara by the thinnest of margins. Her experience was expected to stand her in good stead against Marin.

    And yet, once Marin broke away from the middle of the opening game, Pusarla’s challenge melted down in untypical fashion. The Indian was a frazzled mess in the second game, even as Marin bustled around the court imperiously.

    [​IMG]

    “It’s been really special to be the first player to win three World Championships… This is really special because I, Carolina Marin, came back and I will fight for my next target,” declared the three-time World champion.

    The big surprise in Women’s Singles was the stunning quarter-final exit of hot contender Tai Tzu Ying. The Chinese Taipei star was in unbeatable form heading to the Worlds, having lost just one match out of 35 through the season. It was against He Bingjiao that Tai unravelled, going down tamely after she’d recovered strongly in the second.

    [​IMG]Meanwhile, defending champion Nozomi Okuhara (Japan) went down in the quarter-finals to Pusarla – a reversal of their fortunes from Glasgow; while compatriot Akane Yamaguchi made the semi-finals beating China’s Chen Yufei. It was Pusarla again who dented Japan’s hopes, getting the better of Yamaguchi in a thrilling semi-final, 21-16 24-22.

    Thailand’s Ratchanok Intanon and Canada’s Michelle Li were among the contenders who could not live up to their reputation. Intanon, the 2013 champion, struggled in her second round against Denmark’s Mia Blichfeldt before going down to Nehwal in straight games. Eleventh seed Li was surprised in the second round by Vietnam’s Nguyen Thuy Linh in a tight finish.

    There were encouraging performances from the recent World Junior champions. Malaysia’s Goh Jin Wei outplayed Japan’s Aya Ohori in the second round before falling to Okuhara, while Indonesia’s Gregoria Mariska Tunjung did justice to her growing reputation by beating Scotland’s Kirsty Gilmour in the opening round.

    Perhaps the tournament’s most arresting image, however, will be that of USA’s Beiwen Zhang doing a full split in a sensational rally in her third round against Tai Tzu Ying. Beiwen won that point but not the match.
     

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