Training Rackets

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by Charlie-SWUK, Dec 23, 2014.

  1. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    So I'm considering buying a training racket to improve my strength a little. I expected them to be cheap, but they're actually a little pricier than expected with the Yonex one reaching almost £45.

    -Would you guys rate training rackets as worthwhile?
    -Do you own or practise with any training rackets?
    -Could training rackets not effect your timing/make your timing poor with a faster racket?
    -Are they worth the money?
    -Which training racket would you recommend?
    -What sort of string tension should a training racket be used at with plastic? 20lbs?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. arfandy

    arfandy Regular Member

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    In essence, there's no such "training racket"as all racket on your hand would literally become "training racket". Mine wss Kumpoo Trerake at 170gram, strung at 24lbs, but can never be used for hitting the birdies because of the balance, flex, etc..etc that won't allow me to use it to hit the shuttlecock even if i wanted to. It's good for warm-up swinging and that's all about it. Then my "training racket" during off-seasonal competition would be Yonex VT80 3U for few sessions of matches (timing adjustment, hitting technique, etc..etc can all be learned throughout experience during the game).

    For physical attributes, some 5-10kg dumbell is sufficient enough to train my wrist, elbow & arm, both forehand/backhand swinging.

    You asked if cheap "training racket" is worth your money, then personally i'd say it ain't worthy at all. Save several hundred bucks and get yourself a VTZFii LCW edition as your training racket. Keep using it for at least 6 months, then get some Arcsaber/Nanoray or victor brave sword/jetspeed series and see the result of your "$210 training racket".
     
  3. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    I've been enjoying my ZF2 as a normal racket haha
     
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  4. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    Try a strength pro one, the build quality is awesome.

    If I wasn't a strong freak, i'd use one.
     
  5. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    Would what arfandy be sufficient? Just using a head heavy like a ZF2?
     
  6. Legitmeister

    Legitmeister Regular Member

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    Been using the Yonex TR-1 for a while and it has been quite effective. For $50, my wrist and forearm strength have increased evident through my improved smash power and ease of wrist flicking.
     
  7. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Did you end up buying and using a training racket @Charlie-SWUK? :) If yes what's your feedback on using one?
     
  8. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    Typical Training racket mostly is very heavy like 2U or U, the rest is kinda ignored. It there for 1 purpose which is to train one muscle & thats it, no technique training with it.

    If you come from light/fast racket, you can get heavier one to train your arm & forearm. But if you come from heavy racket, i guest you need to look for training racket as there is no heavier racket except training racket.

    Economic choice is use plastic bottle filled with sand. Do shadow forehand/smash/clear daily routine outside the court. Already did that & got my muscle to play head heavy 3U for double.
     
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  9. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    In my case I'm contemplating getting the Yonex TR 1 at 118gr. I used to play 4U but I recently picked up an old 3U racket my club originally threw in the trash (Yonex Omega 5) and since using this old racket which I like, I can't play with the 4U ones anymore. I just find it too light and not generating enough impact. I play singles 90% of the time and I do a lot of drills during practice sessions. I could use a training racket for some exercises I guess.

    Also it's worth mentionning I have a coupon from a badminton shop I was recently gifted that I have to use soon. I don't feel the need to buy more badminton clothes or racket (and coupon doesn't work for birdies) instead I thought a training racket would be a better investment.
     
    #9 LenaicM, Aug 10, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  10. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    A training racket can be used not only for strength training, but also for technique training, especially (but not limited to) racket-speed including the preparation for the next shot.
    When actually playing a game with a training racket, you'll know immediately when you were out of position, especially with a lighter one (118 g is not heavy for a training racket), that might be a fun option too.

    Just get another pair of your favorite shoes! That's my recommendation, because you'll use them eventually and when there's a model you really like at the moment, you should just get another pair. You won't regret that.
     
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  11. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    That's actually my first choice and probably the best option... :) Although I just bought a new pair in May and was wanting to use the coupon for a "purpose". I don't like to spend money for stuff and I prefer to use it for lessons, birdies, fresh strings and shoes or anything that can help me progress. The training racket sounds interesting and I might still give it a go as like you mentioned, it still have a training purpose and could help me progress, even a little. I also do a ton of shadow drills lately so it would help a bit for that too with the cover for dry swings.
     
    #11 LenaicM, Aug 10, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  12. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Double post.
     
  13. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    carefull sometimes its become addiction:p.
    None can beat the heavy racket for its best momentum generation tho in excange you sacrifice speed. Yet other hand none can beat lighter racket for its best speed with the loss of momentum generation. Some people like speed some other like the momentum generation.

    I start my very 1st play with very old legacy Yonex racket. An all steel & pretty heavy (U). Switching to 3U give me better manouver as it definitely lighter, but more lighter than that feel wierd for me tho im still able to play with it. I guest im addicted to the weight.
     
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  14. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    I received my training racket this morning, the Yonex TR1 (118gr), and I'm pretty pleased I pushed through. I did 30-min shadow drills with the racket and the cover on (see photo below) and it gave a good workout to my forearm. I did not try it yet on court with a shuttle in play and I intend to do so carefully to avoid injuries but I can see how it could help some players like me to improve a bit their technique. Even during shadow drills, I could feel that I had to prepare my racket arm earlier than usual as the weight of the racket slowed me down.

    While I had concerns that using a heavy racket would throw away my timing when switching to a regular racket (one of the most common con I've read about training rackets) I don't think it will as the purpose of the training racket is to be used only for training purpose on specific areas while often switching to the regular racket. I finished my shadow drills with my regular racket and it just felt so much better that I think it mostly highlight the quality of my regular racket. Well I'll see after a couple of weeks but for now it's a smart purchase and even I had a coupon who somehow obligated me to buy something in a badminton shop, I'm glad I now have a training racket.

    1565778163865.jpg

    1565779067523.jpg
     
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  15. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    From my experience, the injury problems come if you try to do the very explosive actions like a smash (rotator cuff) or backhand clears (Wrist joint). Don't be tempted to be over ambitious on these two movements.

    Injuries in these two areas can take more than six months to get better.
     
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  16. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    Thank you for the advice. I planned to take it easy knowing there is a risk of injury if I were to play carelessly but I can see I should even be more cautious when using the racket after what you said. I'll stick to basic drills (and never at full swing power) on a short period of time and alternate with my regular racket for more impact. It should be fine this way :)
     
  17. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    No need to try hard stroke with it, as its purpose is to train your muscle. Even an easy stroke but do it repeatly will surely makes your arm sore. But when you do it daily routine & after 1 or 2 month your muscle have used to it, then switch back to your main weapon & here the magic will happen. Your stroke feel stronger & you will feel your racket is lighter than before.
     
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  18. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    I already got a glimpse of that feeling after a 30-min exercise in the garden and switching back and forth from my regular (3U) to training racket. I guess I'm slowly being converted to heavy rackets too. o_O:D
     
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  19. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    I guess for pros full smash is not a problem when using a training racket.

    Brice Leverdez smashing in full power mode with the Yonex TR1: :eek::cool:

     
  20. khoai

    khoai Regular Member

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    Unlike other cheap heavy training rackets, TR1 is very playable due to its more balance and relatively stiff shaft. I use it all the time playing easy games or when I want to force myself to work harder maintaining attack because you can't defend very well with it. Usually nobody knows what it is due to its nice design and brand so ppl are not offended that you use a training racket against them.

    There is also a heavier version TR0 (150g). I may get that one too.
     

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