When will China's dominance end?

Discussion in 'World Championships 2006' started by Eurasian =--(O), Sep 24, 2006.

  1. sshuang90

    sshuang90 Regular Member

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    So dose LYB. ..............................
     
  2. Baderz_Jas

    Baderz_Jas Regular Member

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    Hope it will be him! :D Or FHF :)
     
  3. Baderz_Jas

    Baderz_Jas Regular Member

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    I think both... :rolleyes:
     
  4. ctjcad

    ctjcad Regular Member

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    Just out of curiosity..

    ..hmm, i'm not sure abt this, perhaps one of our "senior" BC member or one who've been following CHN badminton for a long time can confirm, but has there ever been a head coaching position(ie. like LYB) in CHN's national team history held by a woman??..With the things going now, with WS and WD "dominating" the rest of the squad and international competition, i wonder if perhaps it's time for a woman to be given a chance @ the forefront for that position ??..hmm;) :) :cool:
     
    #104 ctjcad, Oct 1, 2006
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2006
  5. BMcentral

    BMcentral Regular Member

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    Why not have a Men's head coach and a Women's Head coach rather than combine them together?
     
  6. samkool

    samkool Regular Member

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    since china has the full support of its gov't, i would set it up with a singles coach for men & women, doubles coach for men & women, and a mixed coach. those 3 coaches would report to the head coach, and together they would have control over the direction and future of the players and team.

    don't they sort of have this in place already?
     
  7. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

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    when LYB leaves the team, china's badminton will begin a new life. so will many of the coaches and players.

    would you want LYB to be malaysia's head coach if it can be done?;)
     
  8. baihaki_as

    baihaki_as Regular Member

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    i woukd like for indonesia
     
  9. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

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    if so, i would think you are a genuine china supporter. :D
     
  10. Quasimodo

    Quasimodo Regular Member

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    Exactly. And, IMHO, with continuing sound coaching and player development programs they'll no doubt be competitive at the top level as well. Combined with Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, England, South Korea, etc., they'll present a challenge to the current Chinese dominance.

    Take the USA basketball national team as an example. Barely 14 years ago (i.e., '92 Barcelona Olympic), any winning margin less than 20 points was considered an upset. No other teams could even come close in international competitions. If you'd asked anyone back then whether they think USA dominance in basketball would end, I'm positive you'd've gotten an are-you-kidding look. These days we've problems even getting to the final never mind winning the gold medal. But, if you look at the results, you wouldn't find 1 or 2 teams who consistently beat the US team. Rather, the rest of the world as a whole have improved. And that'll happen in badminton, too. Well within our lifetime. :)
     
  11. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    it also depends on individual definition of domination. To me, domination is having representation in semi and up consistently.
     
  12. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I see your point.

    However, badminton is rather consider as "individual" sport (at most need 2 to be a double pair), where as basketball you need a whole team, which is a totally different case.

    Personally, it's easier to play a catch up in a team sport, as the more effective game strategy allow players to cover each other's weakness. However, individual skills require a longer time to be improved. That's why under different rules, the international basketball players shine in world games, but struggle big time in NBA.
     
  13. samkool

    samkool Regular Member

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    exactly.
    right again. also, the best int'l team still can't beat the best nba team, ie. greece vs. miami heat
     
  14. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    A bit off topic.

    The US (so-call dream team) lost due to there's no "team work" as they only have several weeks to prepare. The lackness of pure "shooters" hurt the "team strategy" even more. Therefore, I conclude this as, a group of great "individuals" got beaten by a true team.

    That's why ppl used to recommend instead of sending off the "dream team", US should select a top level NBA team (assume this particular team does not carry too many key int'l stars) to present.
     
  15. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    some think china domination is bad but i think for badminton it's different. Just not long ago there are small talks that IOC might drop badminton from the olympic games. Without USA, having china on the badminton side during this growing pain period is a plus IMO. It would be much harder for IOC to vote badminton out of the olympic when china will fight hard to preserve 3 sure gold medals (WS, WD, MS). Having success from england in XD also help too.
     
  16. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Once politics step into sport, always make me feel sick. Can you imagine the 2nd most popular sport (only behind soccer) can't even be introduced into Olympics until 1992? And having a hard time to just stay in after not even 20 years??? :(

    All the so-call "one or two nations over dominate leads to dismiss" is simply bs to me. If so, basketball should be the 1st one to be taken off the Olympics after what Dream Team I did in 1992. :cool:
     
  17. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    No special coaches needed for badminton:p
    ------------------------------------------------
    China hires a foreign legion to bring gold
    Posted 1/15/2007 2:35 PM

    By Stephen Wade, The Associated Press
    BEIJING — An American coaches China's women's softball team. A Serbian oversees Olympic men's soccer.
    The men's national basketball team turned to a Lithuanian. In field hockey, the men and women are managed by South Koreans. Need a synchronized swimming coach? The Chinese hired one from Japan.

    Welcome to China's push to overturn the United States as the premier gold-medal power at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, a quest led by dozens of foreign coaches.

    "We're seeing the emergence of a sporting superstate," said British Olympic Association chief executive Simon Clegg. "And it's quite frightening for all the other nations in terms of their preparations and expectations for the 2008 Games."

    He added: "In sporting terms, actually, we're all at war against China."

    Amid a booming economy and frantic Olympic building, China is reported to be training about 20,000 athletes. Even Peter Ueberroth, chairman of the U.S. Olympic Committee, has said China is likely to be No. 1 in Beijing.

    Four years ago in Athens, China won 32 gold medals — just behind the 36 of the United States. Americans won 20 gold medals in just two sports — swimming and track and field. Only in two other sports did they win more than one gold, with the rest coming across a smattering of sports from fencing to taekwondo.

    China won 21 gold medals in five sports: diving, weightlifting, shooting, badminton and table tennis. Of the 28 Olympic disciplines, both countries managed gold medals in about half in Greece.

    Women's softball is a medal possibility, and China hired American Michael Bastian a year ago to improve its standing as the world's fourth-ranked team. The Americans are No. 1, followed by Japan and Australia.

    "My dream would be to see China play the United States in the gold-medal game in 2008," Bastian said, speaking from the team's training camp in the southern city of Guangzhou. "I would have mixed emotions, for sure, but I'd like to experience this."

    China won silver in softball in the 1996 Olympics. Bastian, who grew up near Sacramento, said China has a pool of 600-900 top women's softball players" in a country of 1.3 billion.

    "They have great athletes, but so much of what they learn to do is memorized — mind-mapped," Bastian said. "They work hard, but they have a hard time improvising. If a coach or team leader hasn't given a specific instruction, they have a hard time analyzing. Thinking out of the box — they don't know what that is."

    Bastian, who coached the Akron Racers in the defunct Women's Professional Softball League, says he is well compensated in China.

    "They take good care of me, about like a top-level American college coach," he said.

    An Olympic soccer medal might be China's toughest task. The Chinese were the worst team in the 2002 World Cup, failed to qualify in 2006 and lag far behind Asian rivals South Korea and Japan.

    In hiring Serbian Ratomir Dujkovic three months ago to coach its Olympic team, China passed over at least three men who once led high-profile national teams: Sven-Goran Eriksson (England), Berti Vogts (Germany) and Jacques Santini (France).

    "I worked in Asia before, but this is very challenging — the Olympic Games," said Dujkovic, who coached Ghana to the final 16 of last summer's World Cup, beating the United States and the Czech Republic. He's also coached national teams in Rwanda, Myanmar and Venezuela.

    "Chinese football is at a young stage compared to world football, but we wish to advance as much as possible," said Chinese Football Association general secretary Xie Yalong. "The Olympics in China are providing us with the inspiration to learn from the outside world."

    In basketball, China has the luxury of 7-foot-6 Houston Rockets star Yao Ming and 7-0 Yi Jianlian, who is rated highly by NBA scouts. All of which puts pressure on Lithuanian coach Jonas Kazlauskas. He was an assistant on China's 2004 Olympic team, which reached the final eight.

    Since then, China reached only the final 16 of last year's FIBA World Championship. Kazlauskas has accused his players of being soft, though they did win the Asian Games last month.

    "Jonas Kazlauskas is a clever coach," said Li Yuanwei, head of the nation's Basketball Administration Center, the national governing body. "Sometimes he's quick to get angry, but it's his way of stimulating the players."

    South Korean Kim Chang-back was appointed the women's field hockey coach in 1999. Fourth in Athens three years ago, the team won gold in the recent Asian Games. Compatriot Kim Sang-ryul hopes to turn the same trick with the men's team, and is off to a good start. The squad upset India and Pakistan in the Asian Games before losing the final to South Korea.

    China's most surprising coup came a few weeks ago, signing Japanese coach Masayo Imura to lead synchronized swimming. Imura is called the "godmother" of Japanese synchronized swimming. She hopes her move will improve China-Japan relations, though some see her as a traitor.

    "There have been few examples in the past of a top Japanese female instructor being hired by a foreign country as the coach of its national team," the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun wrote in an editorial. "This is a challenge that will also break new ground for Japan's female sports community."
     
  18. t3tsubo

    t3tsubo Regular Member

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    should that have gone in a new thread?

    the fact that china pwns in sports is obvious, they have 3 times anyone elses (other than russia) population. for every taufik hideyat indonesia has, china has 5 players of that caliber (k not THAT that good but still). Also, they start training some sport disciplines from as early as age 4! Extrodinairly flexible and strong girls with good genes (no jk) are selected for chinese gymanistics academy in beijing. 4 hours school, 6 hours sports, boarding school. Insanity.
    plus they just want to beat the americans like everyone does.
     
  19. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    u listed many points but your point about populaton advantage is not quite convincing. Austraila and the old east germany has far less people but they do extra ordinary well in major competitions across all sports. Twenty to thirty years ago, china has billions of people too but they china wasn't even in anybody radar.

    In term of popularity, badminton is far more popular in INA than in china. From the above chinese news article, badminton was just a side note. If i use your reasoning, denmark can produce kenneth J, peter gade, shouldn't INA with much bigger population and badminton popularity, produce more taufik-like players?
     
    #119 cooler, Jan 15, 2007
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2007
  20. t3tsubo

    t3tsubo Regular Member

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    no because you can reason that only 1 in 10000 people have the potential to be that good. The fact that badminton is so poular in indonesia doesnt mean there are more people, it means they find more of those people. same goes for denmark, its such a popular sport there, that they find all of those people with that talent. while badminton is popular in china, it is hardly as pursued since china is focusing on so many sports. If it was so popular that every kid would grow up playing it (like hockey in canda), then obviously china would have EVEN more crazy good players. the same arguement goes for any other country. austrailia infact, wins kthe majority of their medals in the olympics not from many sports, but from swimming. it is there national sport after all, and all kids try it so theres plenty of coaches who can see the talent and convince the kid to pusue it to a olympic level.
    also, there the random distribution aka luck factor, maybe denmark just happened to be lucky this past decade.
    on top of that, coaching is such a huge factor in developing the skills of those players WITH the potential, that that is why china is bringing in so many foriegn coaches. Imagine if peter gade was taught badminton until he was 18 by some high school physed teacher, all that talent would have been wasted.

    k this post is getting too long
     

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