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How do you define the difference "power" & "speed" regarding rackets?

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by Robin76, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. Robin76

    Robin76 Regular Member

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    Dear All!
    In advance: Sorry, it`s maybe a stupid question.
    But ofter you can read about rackets, which have (for example) a good and very fast speed, but not enough (or not so much) power. Sometimes it`s not clear to understand that difference.
    If I want to play a good smash, I need speed. The speed of the shuttle. To generate speed, you need power.
    Same for a good drive shot in Doubles. You need the power to generate fast speed.
    Where is my "error in reasoning"? Can you give me an example for typical racket with good and less good power/speed?
    I think the idea is: With a head heavy racket, you can generate a powerful and fast smash, but its more difficult to play a fast defence drive, correct?
    Thank you,
    Robin
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Been discussed many times. All it boils down to is the momentum of the racket head is transferred into the shuttle. ..... P=mv will show that momentum is dependent on mass and velocity, specifically the racket head. Hence you'll see that you can get the same P if you can swing a light racket head fast enough or alternatively a heavier racket swung just as fast. All of us have different muscle strength and muscle speed, so it's up to you to find out for yourself what suits you best by trying out various rackets of differing balance points (head heavy, balanced, head light) and weights (3U, 4U).
     
  3. ssgg007

    ssgg007 Regular Member

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    well according to yonex. The kinetic energy equation would be a better choice. 0.5 * m * v^2

    As you can see, velocity is more important from the formula. However, in the case of humans. Each of us has a maximum swing speed. Hence we need to find a racket that maxmise our racket speed yet weight the most. Also, it is about your ability to hit the sweetspot on your racket all the time ( accuracy). ie the transfer of energy from your racket to the shuttlecock.

    Because of the above factors, you have to find a racket.

    - maximise your swing speed.
    - ideal weight for you to maximise power.
    - ideal flex and weight for you to maximising the transfer of energy.
    - most important thing is a racket that allows you to maximise your potential for a 1-2 hour session. You don't want a racket that allows you to play exactly like pros for only like 5 minutes.
     
  4. moomoo

    moomoo Regular Member

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    I believe its easier to drive with a heavy head racket as it has more power/momentum. However, its harder to move you racket to your desired position due to the higher iniertia/momentum as well.

    this is where you trade off speed for power. in defence you might need to switch your racket from a left hip block to a right shoulder lift. its more difficult to manouver your racket if the head is heavy.

    also you could have a light head and with lower stiffness. here you can increase the speed of the shuttle through the transfer of stored energy as you bend the racket when you swing. however, the stronger/faster you can swing, the more energy can be stored in the shaft. thats why pros use stiffer rackets.
     

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