Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Pain in the wrist

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by sarath_031, May 16, 2012.

  1. sarath_031

    sarath_031 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    India
    I Think this is the Dequervains tenosynovitis syndrome. My muscles side to the wrist, are paining and the muscles straight to the arm near the elbow and up the right arm. There is pain when i play badminton for like 4-5 hours a session, but that is not happening nowadays. The pain started when i started using the squeeze ball(http://www.ebay.in/itm/BODY-SCULPTU...7?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_203&hash=item4165d705bf). I grip the ball completely with my fingers and squeeze the ball with 5 fingers at same time. Is the pain because, the ball cannot be used or my way of using it is wrong? How can i prevent this????
     
  2. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,278
    Likes Received:
    31
    Occupation:
    something far too busy for my badminton needs
    Location:
    Canada
    If it's deQuervain's tenosynovitis then this will trigger your pain:
    -Hold your arm out in front of you, thumb up.
    -Then make a fist, tucking your thumb in under your fingers.
    -Finally, tilt your wrist toward the floor -- as if you were holding a racket up vertically in front of you and then were pushing it to point horizontally forwards.

    It's deQuervain's tenosynovitis if this causes pain and burning on the "top" part of your wrist just back from the base of your thumb.

    Seems an unsual pain for a badminton player. It is caused by overuse in holding things up (in my case, carrying baby twins around). No matter the cause, the treatment -- as with most things that end in "-itis" -- involves ice, rest, and the advice of a health care provider who can see you with his/her own eyes and touch you with his/her hands. :eek:
    Best of luck!
     

Share This Page