Diet Rules An Athlete Must follow

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Kirtigrover, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. Kirtigrover

    Kirtigrover Regular Member

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  2. opikbidin

    opikbidin Regular Member

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    10 Diet Rules An Athlete Must follow
    By khelkit on 30 Jul, 2015

    An athlete is one who participates in physical exercises or sports, especially in competitive events. To become an elite athlete what it needs is: good genes, good training and conditioning and a sensible diet.

    10 diet plans an athlete must follow are as follows:

    Load your diet with Carbohydrates

    Carbohydrate is considered as the fuel for the athlete. The athletes get benefited mostly from the stored carbohydrate in their body. In the starting stage of normal exercises, the stored carbohydrates provide 40-50% of the energy required. Carbohydrates yield more energy per unit of oxygen consumed than fats.

    Spaghetti, potatoes, lasagna, cereals and other grain products are a good source of complex carbohydrates; while Simple carbohydrates are found in fruits, milk, honey and sugar. While the process of digestion takes place, the body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose and stores it in the muscles as glycogen.

    Get sufficient Protein

    It is known to us that protein is the body-building element; with no or less energy giving quality. Rather, it helps the athlete in building the muscles. As per the reports say, 10-12% of protein intake is sufficient. After doing exercise, the body of the athlete calls for protein. Milk provides a good balance of both protein and carbohydrates. Both casein and whey protein are contained in milk. The presence of both the types of protein may be particularly helpful for athletes. Protein helps in speedy recovery.

    Fat: substitute for carbohydrate

    Fats also provide the body with energy fuel. If the carbohydrate in the body gets low, the body looks to the sources of fat.The athletes undergoing training, use fat for energy more quickly than untrained athletes. The fat consumption should not fall below 15 percent of total energy intake because it may limit performance.

    Vitamins and Minerals: From varied diets

    A good amount of vitamins and minerals are easily obtained from the different varieties of food. Minerals play an important role in the performance. Thepresence of sodium, potassium, calcium, and iron is affected by a long hour of intense exercise. Mostly the female athletes require much vitamins and minerals during their practice sessions.

    Drink plenty of Water

    A long hour of workout or exercise in the hot weather is enough to dehydrate the athlete. But, this can affect the professional life of the athlete. Water is therefore an important nutrient for the athletes. Drinking chilled water whenever possible can be helpful as it quickly helps in the digestion process than the water at room temperature. It also helps to cool down the body.

    Replace lost electrolytes

    Sweating leads to the loss of fluids and electrolytes both. To tackle this situation, the best option for the athlete is to take sports drinks. The best way to get the best balance of fluids and electrolytes is to take sports drinks diluted with equal amount of water.

    Get rid of the food that are considered ‘Healthy’, But they aren’t

    The food products that pretend to be healthy and claim that their health benefits right on the package: low fat, fat free, etc.. are actually not. Instead, they can be made from the worst type of floor that is actually processed. The bad quality sugar are made gluten-free. All of them will do one thing and that is to make you fat.

    Follow a proper diet schedule

    The athlete needs to follow a proper schedule for diet. That must include:

    Post Training Second breakfast
    Post Training snack
    Bed-time Snack

    Don’t skip Breakfast

    As stated by Dan Benardot, who works with Olympic distance runners (10,000m and up) and oversees the nutrition programin US; One of the biggest mistakes athletes make is heading out for a run in the morning without eating anything first.

    So try your best not to skip the breakfast at any cost.

    Be Strict to follow the rules

    It’s easy to make diet rules, but the hard part is to keep it following. The athletes who are under their training period; it’s important for them to be strict towards the rules to get the best results. The rules if followed reguraly, will surely help in increasing the stamina.
     
  3. dbswansea

    dbswansea Regular Member

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    That's far too black and white and about 15 years out of date.

    The only diet rule an athlete needs is

    1. See a real performance nutritionist. Everyone's physique and nutritional needs are different and a "colour by numbers" approach doesn't work any more.
     
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  4. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    When I have training sessions in the evening I don't eat much over the day, but IMO enough. Normally I just ate a Banana or 30g oatmeal with 200ml milk with a large cup of coffee. Than I skip the lunch or only go for a salad. 3.5 to 4hours before the training starts I drink a big cup of strong earl grey with honey and 2 slices of bread with cottage cheese. Over the day I drink 1-1.5l water. During training I eat normally nothing. Just 1 oreo if my stomach feels too empty. I drink during training 1.5 to 2l water. After training I eat 300g vegetables, 150g Tofu and a bit rice and drink also 1-1.5l water. I found out over the years that I feel with this plan best on court and perform well. On off days I eat at different times and change the meals but I always keep in mind to eat vegetables, proteins and carbs. IMO everyone is different. Some people can perform well with a Schnitzel, fries and a pint of beer on court. For me this don't work.
     
  5. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    ^ Looks like you can eat more protein ie. meat after training ...tofu only has 8g per 100g.
     
    #5 visor, Aug 8, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
  6. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    If you train seriously, it's better to overeat than not to eat enough.

    I'm a small guy so I struggle to pack away bowls of pasta, so I use foods that are quite calorie dense even if they contain high fat.

    McVities Chocolate Digestives can quickly become your friend at something like 85 calories a biscuit.
     
  7. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    I'm a vegetarian, so meat is a bad idea and I struggle with protein source which don't have much fat. I only eat that way on training days.
    oatmeal + milk = 5g+6.6g
    28g Protein from the cottage cheese.
    The tofu which I prefer has 16.7g Protein/100g.
    I eat kidney beans (150-200g) after training or on off days which deliver around 11g NOT BEFORE. Since I farted during a backhand clear and everybody was laughing, I try to avoid them before.

    Sum=75.65g Protein for training days. Not much, but enough to survive.:D On the off days I eat different stuff and larger meals. I can't eat much if I train. I feel heavier, slower, lazy and my stomach don't feel good. I also try to loose weight. So my nutrition is not the standard (vegetarian, loosing weight, sensitive stomach) but it works for me. I don't recommend it anybody else.
     
  8. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Interesting. I just looked up some vegetarian websites, and one doesn't need much protein (only 75g or so for 140 lb athlete)...

    And I just had 400g rib eye steak last night... :eek:
     
    #8 visor, Aug 9, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2015
  9. Indigo Wolf

    Indigo Wolf Regular Member

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    Just eat more every single day but also make sure you get enough calories and protein to keep going.
     
  10. Wifislow

    Wifislow Regular Member

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    Do you think we need whey Protein? If I only do press ups and pull ups at home, running and badminton outside home, worth getting one?
     
  11. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    if u decide to do it, do it in moderation.

    there are cases of kidney failures because ppl drink too much protein.
     
  12. Wifislow

    Wifislow Regular Member

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    Yea... be aware.. I decided to train up a bit, but not sure if the "workout" level is strong enough to consume the protein.. you know those from Whey is considered excess as it is too much for daily usage (correct me if I'm wrong)
     
  13. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    It depends on your general diet though. If you eat a lot of nut products, fish, white or red meat as part of your daily diet, then unless you're pushing extremes, you probably won't need supplementation. Personally I prefer to use a weight gainer instead of pure protein, and take it in a half dose, but that's because I'm borderline underweight.
     
  14. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    what does a weight gainer do? and where do the weight gain? muscles? fat?
     
  15. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    It's a mix of protein and carbs.

    A full serving (6 scoops with 750ml of milk) has around 1200 calories in it, along with protein. It'll obviously go into fat and be burned to repair muscles, but I find it easier to have that in my diet than just eating more. Then again I'm 6' and 64kg so I can afford to gain some fat.
     
  16. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    You don't need whey, when you have a good nutrition plan. It's easier to mix a shake instead of cooking. If you are vegetarian and struggle with proteins, you can consume whey or other protein drinks. Normal people need 0,8g of protein pro kg body weight. If you are 75kg on the scale 75g protein per day should be enough to be save. Maybe a bit more if you train hard, but this excessive consumption of protein (2g per kg body weight) is not necessary and can harm your health. It's also good to have different protein profiles in your nutrition. If you eat fish, meat, eggs, bread, beans and cottage cheese regular, you should be fine.

    I normally prepare my food. I normally cook on off-days(no training) evening. I cook a huge portion of meals to have a dinner, next day lunch at work and dinner after the training day. I check my macros and micros daily. If you eat a good mixture of different kind of foods every day, you are safe. I just need D3. No other supplement. I drink 5 liter of quality mineral water on training days and 3-3.5 on off days. I'm far away from beeing a pro, I'm just a healthy dude.
     
  17. Wifislow

    Wifislow Regular Member

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    I'm not vegetarian, i'll try getting more protein thru meats.
    But I'm just too skinny 25cm o my upper arm, 83cm around my chest. So, do I need "help" from nutrition/ food?
     
  18. Schultzier

    Schultzier Regular Member

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    I have had a depressing period in my life where running first thing in the morning worked extremely well for my brain health! Before eating that is. Mentally, I have gone from blunt to sharp in less than two weeks and have been feeling excellent for many months after - it was a very good year. Those morning runs left me feeling great the entire day. Now I was not a 10k runner as I could barely complete a 1km run without huffing and puffing but I really loved those morning runs! Crazy me imagined that I was chasing some animal during the run and rewarded myself with a meaty breakfast when I came home..:D

    Personally, I do not understand why someone has to follow strict diet rules? No offence I just dont understand why and how it works. Do those diet plans ever work for people in the long run? I am struggling to understand how a diet plan would be healthy. Ideally, we should all know our appetite, brain chemisty etc and adjust our diets according to our energy expenditure. If we are running a 10km run every day, it would be obvious that we would need to eat more potatoes and rice for example. I understand the pure engry expenditure part of the equation, however, as we people are alive and have a lot more to give of ourselves than 10k runs, shouldnt we try to eat different things to try to mimic how food is found in nature? If we eat all of the potatoes that grow next to our shed in the bush then we will not have any left and will have to find different sources of food - perhaps I am missunderstanding something but shouldnt the body expect this?

    When I was a student, I have had a period where I drank a lot of diet coke. After a few weeks, I started to get nightmares and seizures in my sleep. I avoid artificial sweeteners like the pest now. There are a lot of artificial sweeteners in WHEY powders. It is ironically a little funny how all those poor athletes are training so hard, eating so strictly but end up with sudden death. It is happening very often now actually!!
     
  19. SnowWhite

    SnowWhite Regular Member

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    You are very fortunate to have an appetite that adapts to your energy expenditure. For some, their baseline appetite is simply too much or too little, and doesn't adapt, or not enough, to their expenditure.

    My appetite doesn't keep up with my expenditure. I simply don't get hungry fast enough or often enough. I cycle a lot as it is my main form of transportation. The more exercise I do, the more food I need, but the less I want to eat. Sometimes my stomach is hungry while my brain doesn't care, as in, I can feel the feeling of hunger, but my brain doesn't recognize it as unpleasant, and doesn't motivate me to eat. I also need to remind myself to eat when I'm not hungry, to ensure that I won't suddenly get light-headed as the day goes on. If I forget, or don't care enough to be disciplined about it, I can suddenly hit a mental wall, where I lose the ability to focus.

    It also affects badminton. I cycle for 1 hour twice a day(commute) on thursday and friday. On saturday I cycle for 45 mins to badminton, I play singles for 2 hours (not continuously obviously), and cycle home. On sunday I play 2 hours of doubles with a 30 minute cycle before and after. I'm not racing, it's a leisurely pace so I don't get tired, but my legs are still moving. Over these 4 days, recovery is a serious concern for me, muscle recovery, but also tendons and ligaments. If I forget myself, and am not disciplined about eating enough, I develop overuse injuries, I'm more likely to get 'properly' injured.

    So, I need to make sure I get enough carbs and protein, or I will have to deal with the miserable consequences if I don't.

    I'm likely in the minority. There is a huge subset of people whose appetite overshoots their expenditure. If they simply follow their appetite, they will put on too much weight, and suffer the many consequences that come with it. While going against their appetite takes effort, it is worth it, to maintain a healthy body and mind. As it is worth it for me to go against my appetite to ensure I don't suffer the consequences of nutritional deficiencies.

    So a diet plan is healthy insofar as it meets the person's nutritional needs, and that can deviate from how much, and what, their appetite directs them to eat. The body, for all its magnificent abilities, isn't flawless or perfect.


    If you are worried about artificial sweeteners in whey powder, as far as I know unflavored whey powder won't have any.
     
    #19 SnowWhite, Sep 30, 2022
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2022
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  20. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    I think different person had different resistance to something. Myself for example.
    Since kids i had huge appetite that could eat twice amount of regular adult portion. I remember, many time my parent stop me coz i ask for the 3rd one:(, but regardless those crazy amount of food i eat, im still very slim (pretty sure all lady would envy me for that:p).

    I start to bulking up after i work. Probably coz less activity, sitting behind the desk most of the time yet still love to eat. One day my company did health test to all their employee. When my result come out, the doctor said "sir, have you do a strict diet lately? Coz ur colesterol are quite low". I see my own panda stomache & talk to myself, hey where have you been hiding during the check:D. Even now after my badminton routine, i would go for culinary adventure with friend & sometimes eat like crazy. Also, i ask my friend who is a doctor & he tell different person had different tolerance to something. Some people just eat a tiny bit & they quickly become fatty, yet there is some who could eat a mountain yet still very skinny thin.

    So i guest i had crazy resistance toward colesterol:D. & Maybe my badminton routine that help me stay healthy:p.
     
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