How to become county player in uk

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Sports10, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    maybe you can post some videos of your matches.
     
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  2. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    Hope you have a good county. Where I am there are a lot of players that seem to get in the team just due to historic or social reasons.
     
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  3. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    You're 16 and haven't had any proper training yet? I've got some bad news for you...
     
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  4. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    That depend on what u call proper training - i mean gym training ive had badminton training technically since im was 10 so TOO BAD IM NOT LISTENING u must be crazy if u think i cant get gold u seem to be a pessimist and because you've given up n your dreams doesn't give u any right to say this -also the fact u never told me the bad new shows me how u plan to break others dreams without ANY valid reasoning
     
  5. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    may i ask what county that is - i hope my county is not like that
     
  6. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    What county are you in?

    edit, ah you said middlesex. don't know anything about them
     
    #26 amleto, Mar 30, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2019
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  7. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    In all honesty, the chances are that he is right. There are a LOT of people in the world. If you haven't been regularly training, that is not just ''technically" i.e. games and hitting around, but drills, routines, footwork shadows, coaching, then you are behind the progress curve compared to your competition.

    Most Olympic gold medallists were winning regional/national open competitions by the age of 18. That means they were very likely to have been winning U16, U17, U18 national competitions before that.

    I am not trying to prove you wrong, or say you cannot make it. But it is a trip that is basically all or nothing, and when your competition started at the age of 6 and train 10-14 times a week, you have a lot of hours to make up, even if you are very talented.

    They say talent only gets you so far. Hard work gets you most of the way. I don't doubt you can work hard, so give it your best and see how you do. Good luck, and enjoy your badminton journey wherever you end up!
     
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  8. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    Ur implying its near impossible however in especially in uk i dont see much competition at all especially with GCSEs and A levels and it appear that its only in countries in far east ie china singapore malaysia that u almost have to train before 10yrs old here .u can train technically an improve ur basics up to 16 then things seem to get more serious around 15/16 so i dont think ive missed the mark for uk if i was in china , i totally missed the mark anyways LCW started at 11 look what he achieved i started at 10 so i can do the same - how do u know im not as talanted as him?
    And by the time inm 18 i wouldve took part in MANY national competitons - like i only just turned 16!
     
  9. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    oh well thx anyways
     
  10. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Here is the profile of Blake Hoang, U15 English National Champion 2018:
    https://be.tournamentsoftware.com/s...181116F-F437-456C-A0C5-A792E1923A89&player=27

    He is currently therefore the best under 15 player in the country at the moment. If you want to be OG2024 champion, you're going to have to beat him, as well as every other nationally ranked #1 player in every other country in the world.

    Notice how Blake is now playing in tournaments in Cyprus, Czech Republic, Poland. Last year he was playing all over England, entering U17, U19, and Senior (age unrestricted) tournaments up to the Silver level. He has been playing regional and national tournaments since he was under 11. Do you think he is being held back by GCSEs/A-levels compared to you?

    Realistically, it is near impossible to be OG2024 champion if you are not already playing national tournaments. Badminton at high level is not just about 1 match. To win a singles tournament will mean you need to learn to pace yourself to play 5-6 matches (10-18 games) in a single day. If you are not playing tournaments outside of your home county, then you need to start doing so soon if you want to stand a realistic chance of an Olympic medal.

    Another more relatable example - Rajiv Ouseph, England ranked #1, won the English National Championships for the U13, U14, U15, U16, U17, U18 and U19. That is, he was the best player in the UK for 7 consecutive years as he grew up. I'm sure you know what his chances of getting an Olympic medal were/are.

    LCW did start late, but he had regular coaching since 11 and was still closely losing to national level players before he was scouted to join the national team at age 17. Shortly after, he took Bronze at the World Junior Championships 2000.

    That said, I would love you to beat the odds that are stacked against you. Everyone loves an underdog ;)
     
    #30 DarkHiatus, Mar 31, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2019
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  11. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    I guess to a certain extent u r right but Blake is among the minority im sure many people before 15 havent done THAT MUCH -unless their father is coach etc... - id rather just see where this goes then in a years time ill evaluate if i stand any sort of chance
    alsowhen i see ouseeph play i notice alot of tactical faults - nt saying im better than him just i think i wouldnt make some of the mistakes he makes
     
  12. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Middlesex generally tops the tables for county competition. They are definitely a results orientated county.

    They have a lot of players and a lot of teams - definitely a good county to be in. If you have the talent and are hard working, you'll be scouted sooner than later.

    As @Cheung says, I'd go for the junior restricted this year anyway. You need to go for experience - expect to lose but hope to win, because tournaments are mentally completely different to club/league games/matches.

    Put it this way, you cannot be in peak form all of the time. The coaches know what a promising player looks like, even if they're playing badly. Equally, they know what a weaker player playing on form looks like. There are some techniques/movements/tactics that are exclusive to stronger players, whether they are in peak form or not.
     
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  13. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    Doesn't matter that Blake is a minority. You're not trying to beat the 'average' or the majority. You're trying to beat everyone. So, you're kinda far behind.

    Also, 'seeing where this goes' is an aimless target. Targets need to be objective, ie make concrete targets that can be judged as met/not met.
     
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  14. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    @Sports10

    What you underestimate is the value of experience.

    Usually in the first tournament in a new place, people never perform well. However , the second time you go back (which would be the next year), you are more familiar with the environment and know what to expect. This can give you big advantage for next year 2020 Middlesex junior restricted. Would you prepare for a GCSE without doing mocks and practice papers?

    Pro players on the circuit place a lot of importance in practicing in the competition venue before the competition starts. It’s rare for a pro to go to a new venue and win straight away. Since it’s rare for a pro, it means you also need to be smarter with preparation.

    I can assure you that the other juniors you will be up against will have experience playing in the competition hall as it’s the Middlesex base. It’s The Dome in Hounslow. Going there this year as a practice run will probably give you experience that is worth a few points the next year. A few points can be the difference between losing and winning a match in a tie break. Why disadvantage yourself unnecessarily by not playing this year? Regard it as a reconnaissance mission.
     
    #34 Cheung, Mar 31, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2019
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  15. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Didn’t you state your aim is to be a pro?

    You have to start thinking like a pro. Find out what the top juniors are doing and learn from that.
     
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  16. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    The thing is, u don't know for a fact if im behind at all i could be ahead in some cases if im THAT naturally gifted - i won a few kl touramooents and have beaten my 30 yr old pe teacher - i could only be behin in experience not necessarily skill
     
  17. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    Ye and in yr if i commit t one single endeavour ie badminton id know by then if i stand a chance or not as a pro by then
     
  18. Sports10

    Sports10 Regular Member

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    This has encocuraged me to try out this yr september -but it means id need to do A LOT of badminton over summer holidays which im prepared for however i just feel i may be under qualified like i haven't took part in anything big really at all yet due to gcses however when dong a levels i am chosing easy subjects to allow me to focus on badminton plus , i fear that if they reject me this yr they may next yr say that guy is rubbish .
     
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  19. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    [​IMG]

    Beating PE teachers is a sure-fire sign of future olympic gold medals.
     
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  20. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    I've read through this, and honestly, your chances are extremely slim. Reality is, even for the ones that start training young the chances are extremely slim.

    This isn't to be a nay-sayer, or to tell you to give up, but rather manage your expectations. Your number one goal should always be enjoying what you're doing, and if you set yourself incredibly lofty goals I find it hard to believe you'll be consistently enjoying yourself. As others have pointed out, players like Rajiv Ouseph was a top player in the UK all throughout his childhood. Similarly, I've worked with someone who was in the same position - a guy that's played people like Amir Gaffar, Rajiv, Ivanov, and Sozonov - and he started when he was 5 or 6 and never became a super star.

    There's nothing to stop you being a really good player, but just know that what you're talking about is playing amongst the best, which is no easy feat no matter when you start, how naturally talented you are, or how hard you work. Because they are the best, because they too are naturally talented, put in the hard work, and started young. And it's not necessarily your fault either, we in the UK don't have the same kind of discipline to produce athletes that train all throughout their childhood - kids don't want to do it, and adults here don't make them - and for better or worse, you're a product of that societal mentality here. China's the opposite, they have a really strong training regime, and those that don't make it really suffer for it in the long run.

    Enjoy the game, commit as much as you want to commit to it, but don't do so at the sacrifice of your education.
     
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