How we can warm up before playing badminton??

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by andlau88, Mar 28, 2005.

  1. andlau88

    andlau88 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Is there any tips??...
    because i care so much about doing warm ups before sports
     
  2. cheung31

    cheung31 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, Canada
    stretch - calfs, hamstring, arms.

    footwork

    clears

    rallies

    iono just some suggestions
     
  3. ants

    ants Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Messages:
    13,156
    Likes Received:
    25
    Occupation:
    Entrepreneur , Modern Nomad
    Location:
    Malaysian Citizen of the World
    If possible , add jogging to those cheung31 mentioned.
     
  4. ting03

    ting03 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Messages:
    287
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    University Student
    Location:
    Richmond Hill, Canada
    Sometimes, when i really wanna play...e.g. haven't played for a month, i don't even warm up..:p

    but you should sorta stretch and stuff...i remember going to Lee's (badminton lesson place) they made us stretch and jump and everything before we did drills...we warmed up so much that i was sweating before we had started! :eek:

    but usually i just stretch my legs a bit and rally for like 5 mins i guess :rolleyes:

    meh, i don't play super-hard anyways :D

    ting03
     
  5. SWC_Ant

    SWC_Ant Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Richmond, BC; Hamilton, ON
    i dont usually warm up (as in stretching) :rolleyes: bad habit.. but im just too eager to play :D but usually i start by doing clears... then some smashing/blocking.. then warm up my feet ;) during that time whenever im waiting i can swing my racket at the air :p and warm up some overhead, underhand, etc.
     
  6. smash_master

    smash_master Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    player/coach/student
    Location:
    Trinidad & Tobago / Calgary
    do some streaching and use a jump rope that helps also, then you can move into like clears and drives and then just go full into the game. but make sure that you spend a fair amount of time warming up because if you dont it could come back and bite you in the...yeah so be aware of that.
     
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    16,669
    Likes Received:
    868
    Occupation:
    Stock Broker
    Location:
    Singapore Also Can
    Depends on how serious you are. I was given to understand that the Chinese pros spend 15 to 30 minutes alone doing warm-ups before they start to train in the court.

    But as ants has put it, warm up your body first, say by jogging or skipping so that when you start stretching, your muscles will be ready for it. It is good to keep your body moving.

    Then you can do various stretching exercises (don't use force) for the upper body such as your arms, esp your racket arm, elbows, shoulders, neck, back, sides, wrist, in a way to relax the tension in your muscles and prepare for a more demanding action later in the court.

    Once you are satisfied, work on your lower body, your hips, legs (thighs, incl inner thighs), knees, ankles, working on the joints and do a little hopping or jumping to condition yourself.

    Sometimes you may prefer to combine the above two with a slow jog at the same time, esp when you have a group. The group leader will initiate with a certain exercise or action while the rest can follow. There is really no hard and fast rule but getting used to a certain warm-up routine can save you some time and make for efficiency.

    You may also find some exercise more helpful than others, so you can stick with them and eliminate others depending on the time you have on hand.

    Then you can continue your warm-up in the court with your racket and shuttle doing clears, lops, drops, etc, with your partner. Enjoy! For a really good warm-up would have better prepared you for subsequent match action and perhaps save you from unnecessary injuries. :)
     
  8. MarkinJapan

    MarkinJapan Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    6
    Occupation:
    kouchou sensei!
    Location:
    Victoria
    When I was training in Japan with a university team this was our warm up.
    (around three badminton courts)
    -two laps easy jogging
    -one lap side-stepping left
    -one lap side-stepping right
    -one lap shuffle stepping forward
    -one lap shuffle stepping backwards
    -one lap sprinting
    -one lap running backwards
    -two cool down laps

    then

    various streches (about 15mins)

    then
    3 mins clears
    2 mins smashing
    2 mins recieving smashes
    3 mins drives
    3 mins pushes
    2 mins drops
    2 mins recieving drops
    3 mins net

    all in all about 30-45 mintues before we did any drills.
     
  9. andlau88

    andlau88 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    lol...guess wt~!?
    i jus went there in march break,
    but actually, i jus dun get the specific names for all the stretches..
     
  10. andlau88

    andlau88 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    wow...30-45mins!?..that's a bit crazy..lol,
    thx so much,
    but is there any specific stretches to do..??
     
  11. Anatolii

    Anatolii Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2004
    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    PJ, Mal
    Stretching Before Exercise May Not Always Be Best

    (the article is too long - so i've just highlighted the noteworthy parts, for convenience :))

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Although stretching is part of the warm-up routine of athletes everywhere, the practice may actually be counterproductive in certain cases, research suggests.

    Most people stretch before hitting the court, trail or slopes because they believe that it reduces their odds of injury and boosts their athletic prowess.

    There is, however, no clear evidence that a pre-game stretch prevents injuries during the game. And in some instances, stretching right before activity may actually detract from an athlete's performance, according to Dr. Ian Shrier, of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies at SMBD-Jewish General Hospital in Montreal.

    Shrier, who is also a past-president of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, reviews the research evidence on stretching in the March issue of The Physician and Sportsmedicine.

    The potential downside of stretching, according to Shrier, rests in its immediate, short-term effects, with research showing that it causes a small, temporary reduction in a muscle's force and power.

    In the case of an athlete who is already flexible but needs an injection of power in her performance -- greater force in her soccer kick, for example --stretching right before the game may bring no benefit, according to Shrier.

    That is not to say, however, that stretching is of no use to athletes.

    Stretching is analogous to weight training, Shrier told Reuters Health. A bout of heavy lifting leads to fatigue and weakness immediately afterward, but if done regularly can build strength over time.

    Similarly, Shrier explained, stretching seems to cause mild damage to a muscle that weakens it for a short period afterward. But a routine of regular stretching may help build muscle power and force over time.

    One study has suggested that a consistent stretching regimen can improve an athlete's 50-yard dash speed by several hundredths of a second -- a large gain to an elite runner.

    Regular stretching, according to Shrier, means stretching on a daily or near-daily basis -- maybe five times a week -- but not immediately before an activity. It's unclear, he said, whether it's better to stretch after exercise or at a different time in the day altogether.

    Another difference between a consistent stretching routine and pre-performance stretching is that there is some research evidence that regular stretching helps prevent injuries. Those findings, according to Shrier, come from three small studies, so the injury-prevention benefit is not yet conclusive.

    In contrast, studies have generally failed to show that stretching right before an activity reduces the odds of injury.

    But even without such a benefit, it's not time to scrap stretching from active people's warm-ups, according to Shrier.

    In his review, he details several examples where pre-performance stretching may be a boon-for instance, in the case of a tae kwon do athlete whose high kick reaches greater heights right after stretching.

    Similarly, Shrier said that if stretching helps a dancer with the aesthetics of her body form and movement, then stretching before a performance would likely be worth the inch she might lose from her vertical jump due to decreased muscle power.

    The definition of "performance," he noted, depends on the activity. SOURCE: The Physician and Sportsmedicine, March 2005.

    >>> apart from doing rotating motions with the feet (because the ankles're the weak point), i don't do warm ups (before badminton) if i can help it.. because they take up precious time.
     
    #11 Anatolii, Mar 30, 2005
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2005
  12. wing-omega5-0

    wing-omega5-0 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Messages:
    395
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student(uni)
    Location:
    Richmond-BC
    personally, i just stretch my calf muscles, wrist, and ma waist. important to do those "trunk twist" stretches so u dont mess up ur back or waist while turning it too much during a game. btw, i'm only 14 i've already had this problem LOL.
     
  13. Z1985

    Z1985 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2004
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    slack
    Location:
    Singapore
    Previously i played without any warm up and.. sometimes i get to perform real well.(on-form) and sometimes i jus couldn't land any smashes.(off-form)
    Its till my 1st nationals competition that i found out warming up is SO important.
    because i was previously taught how to warm up by a coach.. for like 20 minutes... we were doing all the stretchings. but i find tt i lost my strength after tt.. it gaves me too much flex and too little "springing" effect.. i have to use alot of strength for smashing and clearing... but instead.. i came out wif a warm up session which is like.. less then 5 minutes.. just by stretching ur calfs(sideways and front), i can fasten up my game. by full swinging ur arms, then pressing ur elbow towards ur head, and swinging ur forarms(2 directions), i found tt i can swing my arms easily and still having the "springing" effect. hope this helps. :)
    though my wrist hurting now.. its kinda injured.. i tink i nv warm it up, :(
     
  14. Kamen

    Kamen Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    KL, MAL
    Lazy to read all of Dr. Ian Shrier's research but personally, i am 100% sure that stretching has reduced my sports injury bills. Previously, before i knew the importance of stretching and hence played without doing my strech routine, i often sprained my ankle and back.

    After a stressful day at work, we must loosen our tense muscles before we play, right?
     

Share This Page