Li Ning Rackets Fan Club :)

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by tckang, Sep 16, 2009.

  1. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Maybe it’s because it is indeed made in China?

    Don’t worry, that’s a genuine racket. And a damn great one as well.
     
  2. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    Review and Comparison Li-Ning Aeronaut 9000C and 7000C
    Part 1

    I bought the 7000C back in 2020 for ~155€ (shortly before the lockdowns in our country started) and recently got my hands on a 9000C for ~126€ via the Li-Ning Family (Li-Ning.dk) shop. I have used both rackets for some time now, so I decided it would be time to post a review/comparison, especially since there aren’t many on the 7000C.

    It has been a love hate relationship with both rackets, since they are not very user friendly, and the lockdowns (and therefore reduced time on court) after buying the 7000C didn’t help with that.

    Another factor was my selection of strings: I really struggled with the 7000C when I used BG80 or G-Tone 5. Going for a softer string like the No1 helped with that.


    Why did I buy these two rackets?

    When I bought the 7000C I was looking for a doubles racket which is slightly stiffer than the N9-II since I didn’t felt comfortable with it anymore and also wanted something inbetween the N9-II and N55 when it came to stiffness and balance.

    The 9000C was a bargain (considering the usual prices of LN rackets) and I was going to sell either the 7000C or 9000C after thoroughly testing them. Seeing Yuta Watanabe use it may have influenced the choice a bit:p


    General Specs:

    Wet setup: LN No1@12,5kg, three (five on 9000C) layers of cushion wrap, LN GP1000 overgrip with 50% overlap and thicc ring around buttcap.

    Weight (Dry): 7000C - 89g; 9000C - 88g

    Weight (Wet): 7000C - 99g; 9000C - 98g

    BP (Dry): 7000C - 300mm; 9000C - 298mm

    BP (Wet): 7000C - 293mm; 9000C - 293mm

    Head Weight: 7000C - 43g; 9000C - 43g

    Stiffness: 7000C – medium; 9000C – medium/medium flexible

    Grip Size: 7000C - S2 (G4); 9000C - S1 (G5)

    On a sidenote: I haven't owned a G5 Yonex racket for a long time now, but the S2 grip on LN rackets feels thinner than the G4 grip on the one Yonex racket I have (didn’t measure it though). Could it be the same with S1 and G5?


    Speed & Handling:

    I was pretty happy with the speed of both rackets. The slimmer grip on the 9000C took me quite some time to get used to but makes maneuverability slightly easier.

    Both move well through the air despite being slightly headheavy, while feeling faster than the usual box frame. Probably due to the airstream vents on the bottom of the head (at 4-6 o'clock positions), which seem to behave differently than they did on the N99, where I felt that it didn't really make a difference when it came to speed.

    Drives, interceptions and fast counter attacks are easy to play with both rackets, but slightly easier to control and execute with the slimmer grip on the 9000C. The additional flex also helped with defensive lifts.

    Quick stick smashes and wrist flicks were better and easier to execute with the 7000C on the other hand due to the additional stiffness.

    Neither of them are as fast as a Bravesword 12 or Jetspeed 10, but they make up for it in pretty much all other areas.


    Control & Feeling:

    The additional stiffness of the 7000C made it easier for me to control shots from the mid and backcourt when compared to the 9000C.

    But when playing at the front court the slimmer grip made it easier to control soft shots and play tight net shots. The better maneuverability helped making these shots feel easier and I would prefer the 9000C when playing at the front (which I don’t do most of the time).

    The feeling of both rackets when hitting is quite solid. The Aeronaut frame doesn’t suffer from the hollow feeling of the Turbocharging and on the 3D Calibar series (to a lesser extend though).

    They provide solid feedback after hitting which I sometimes miss from my backup N9-II or BRS 12.

    Not as solid as the usual box frames on Yonex rackets, but very decent.


    Power:

    Since these rackets are not really headheavy, it shouldn't come as a surprise that both are not among the most powerful ones. This must be the hardest part to describe, since I have been used to playing with stiffer rackets (Calibar 900 CP/N55) and/or head heavier rackets (N55, N90-II and also Tectonic 7C).

    At first, I struggled to get comfortable with both rackets. Hitting hard has never been a problem for me and the specs were pretty much what I had been looking for in a racket.

    As expected when looking at the specs, Clears were effortless and both rackets well within my range of comfort regarding stiffness and head weight. Never wished to have a bit more headweight or more/less stiffness.

    Now the tricky part: Smashing with the Aeronauts.

    One major point of critique on the N99 with its Airstream frame has been the user friendliness caused by its smaller sweet spot. This continues to the Aeronaut series of rackets, and it will reward you on a good day, but you won’t be happy to use it when you aren’t focused.

    Both can hit hard but don’t expect anything in the league of a N90 or Astrox 99/88D or Z-Force 2.

    Getting the timing right on the 7000C took a few weeks but the bigger problem was getting used to the 9000C. Since its stiffness was slightly more flexible than I was used to at that time, it took me about 7 weeks of frustration with inconsistent smashing speeds and angles until it finally clicked and I managed to consistently get the timing right.

    That was the moment I fell in love with the 9000C. It hits harder than a N9-II while being similarly fast but slightly more maneuverable and hits as hard as the 7000C but is overall slightly faster and easier to maneuver.

    Dominating the rear court with this beauty and chasing down the mid court just felt right; same story when defending, playing fast flat exchanges and interceptions at the net.

    I didn’t look back at the 7000C after getting used to the 9000C and decided to sell it a few weeks ago, together with the N9-II (only used this one on bad days at that time and even then preferred to go with the Bravesword 12).
     

    Attached Files:

    #6462 Woesi, Dec 30, 2021
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2021
  3. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    Part 2
    Comparison with other rackets:


    A quick comparison with the other rackets in my bag before the conclusion:

    Speed/Maneuverability:

    BRS 12 (3U) > N90-II (sanded down to 4U) = 900 (CP) >= N9-II = 9000C > 7000C > N55 > Tectonic 7C

    Control:

    N55 > Tectonic 7C > 900 (CP) > N90-II (4U) > 7000C = 9000C > N9-II > BRS 12

    Feeling:

    N55 > 9000C = 7000C > Tectonic 7C > 900 (CP) > N90-II (4U) > N9-II > BRS 12

    Power:

    N55 = Tectonic 7C > 7000C = 9000C > 900C (CP) = N90-II (4U) = N9-II > BRS 12


    Conclusion:

    I love the design of these rackets. Once again, a great job by the designers over at LN.

    Both rackets are rather fast when considering their specs and can pack a punch.
    They are not as forgiving or easy to use as a BRS 12 or N9-II f.e. but will exceed these two when it comes to power and control without sacrificing much speed.

    I feel like the 9000C and 7000C are solid rackets (especially for doubles) which do not have to compromise on either speed or power as much as many other rackets which are either similarly fast or similarly powerful.

    Who should use these rackets? Both rackets can be used for singles or doubles, with the 7000C feeling like it caters more towards male mixed doubles or rear court doubles players, who like to hit hard without sacrificing too much speed.

    The 9000C on the other hand works well on both the front and back, allowing to comfortably play fast flat exchanges and hit hard from the back. Would be a great choice for mixed doubles as well. The thinner grip and therefore increased maneuverability make it excel in fast paced doubles.

    If you prefer a slightly stiffer shaft, a thicker grip and don't want to spend as much money as you'd need to buy the 9000C, go with the 7000C.
    If you like a bit more flex and prefer the thinner handle, go for the 9000C.
     

    Attached Files:

    #6463 Woesi, Dec 30, 2021
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2021
  4. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Very comprehensive review and comparison. Thanks for taking the time to write this down!
    First time I actually got a feeling where to put the 9000C. 43 g wet head weight in my book clearly is on the heavy side of things - and I’m really surprised by the quite flexible shaft. That’s a combination you really can’t find in any other higher end racket these days I think.
     
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  5. Cloudx

    Cloudx Regular Member

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    Hi All, would want to know in Lining what range which are similar to N9ii but at 4U weight?
    Been using N9ii for a few years now & it's a very tough racket cause I had multiple racket clashes in the past and yet the racket is still fine & able to hold 27lbs of string tension.
    After being in lockdown for 2 years + my arm strength is no longer as strong as previously, thus my arm get tired quite easily after 3 rounds of double match. I'm looking to get another lighter racket which are similar with N9ii but I'm not familiar with Linings specs. Could anyone advice me?
     
  6. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    TC80 are 4U of TC75 AKA N9ii
    Why not keep using it. Pretty sure it only matter of time you are getting used to it again.
     
  7. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    Well, switching to a lighter racket may help with arm fatigue, but you will find it harder to generate the same amount of power on all strokes that require power.
    The N9-2 also isn't a demanding racket by any means...
    I agree with @Budi, give it some time to get back into a rythm and you will have no problem using the N9-2 again.

    But to give you some recommendations for slightly lighter rackets in the W2 (4u) weight range:
    -imo the best choice: Tectonic 7
    It has very similar specs to the N9-2 and reviews state it also is very user friendly.
    The Tectonic frame is mostly a classic box frame and it will have better feel on Hits but be less aerodynmic

    -3D Calibar 200 and 300 also seem to have similar specs on paper, but rely on a different, slightly less aerodynmic frame (everybody I know who has tried both Turbo Charging and 3DCalibar rackets preferred the feel on the Calibar series)
    They are entry level rackets so don't expect the same durability
     
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  8. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    I recommend to lower the tension after a long break first. Very low budget investment. After a pause of nearly 8 month I also started at 23lbs instead of my regular 27 until I got my consistency and strength back and increased on every new job by 1-2 lbs.
     
    #6468 ucantseeme, Jan 4, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2022
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  9. Thang Nghiem

    Thang Nghiem Regular Member

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    I'm also quite surprised when Watanabe switched from the Duora Z-Strike to this racket. Sure, the balance points are somewhat similar between the two rackets, but the DZS is quite literally the stiffest racket out there. You don't suppose they custom-made a stiffer one for him/other pros? I love everything about Li-Ning rackets, but I just hate how flexible a lot of their rackets are. They feel floppy in fast doubles.
     
  10. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    In the past LN had CP coded rackets for the Chinese players which usually were stiffer versions of the originals.

    Haven't heard much about CP rackets since the launch of the Aeronaut, 3DC and TC series back in 2017 (I know there are CP versions within the Calibar series at least) but it wouldn't surprise me if Yuta was playing with CP (or custom) versions of the 9000C and 9000i
     
  11. Bakamaru

    Bakamaru New Member

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    Anyone played enough with the Li Ning AxForce 80 (non CL version) yet for a review?
     
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  12. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    It also wouldn't surprise me that pro players are not so sensitive and picky to rackets like the average BC member with the stiffer is always better mindset. I mean nearly the half korean national team used the BS12 and even the KRP version was not really far apart from the commercial. There are also a bunch of Li-Ning rackets which are in the same stiffness-category like a VT80, Arc-ZS, NR-ZS and there are also players like e.g. Marvin Datko who won't get any cp or custom, but will still experience faster doubles matches than most BC members here.
     
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  13. Martynas

    Martynas Regular Member

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    mixed doubles is not playable with 5u like for real real - it is definitely not an option, especially to interchange with 3u in the same tournament
     
  14. Thang Nghiem

    Thang Nghiem Regular Member

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    Pro players are humans, like us. Some are more sensitive to specs, and some are not. If your response was directed at my earlier response in anyway, let me clarify. My favorite feeling racket is the DZS, because of the stiffness and solid feel. I’m not saying it’s my best performing racket, to me. I just prefer the feel of a stiffer racket.

    What current line-up Li-Ning rackets are on the stiffer side, other than a couple in the Combat trim, that you are aware of? Even those in that trim aren’t all that stiff. I guess I would welcome a LN racket that feels similar to DZS or other even-balance/head-light rackets like NF800/NR900/9900. But I suppose stiff and headlights aren’t really LN’s thing.
     
  15. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    With LN you pretty much only get around medium flexibility and slightly headheavy to headheavy specs;)

    At least they have introduced different weight classes for the same racket now (Tectonic 9 and AXForce 80 available in 3u to 5u) to hopefully reduce the amount of rackets they have in their lineups
     
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  16. Thang Nghiem

    Thang Nghiem Regular Member

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    Haha now that you mentioned it. I’m a direct sale agent for LN (only for my club, non-profit). The amount of “different” rackets are mind-boggling, with overlapping/redundant and inconsistent marketing/specs. Case in point: some rackets in the Drive trim have higher balance points and weights than some in the Combat trim. It’s a mess. With my main LN distributor in Canada, I don’t have much hope of seeing the new rackets anytime soon.
     
  17. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    Great, than please stick to it. IMO it is a bit strange to hit a Fan-thread of any brand and moan that they don't have the rackets for fringe groups and play different than any other brand. I mean, there a low percentage of players who prefer such an extreme racket and can wield without getting tired. LN simply have no even, super-stiff compact frame. So your search will end here and you need to look for products of other brands.
     
  18. Sumanth99

    Sumanth99 Regular Member

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  19. Woesi

    Woesi Regular Member

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    Li-Ning Badminton rackets Catalogue for the 2021 Fall/Winter Season:
    https://www.shopnings.com/pub/media/descriptions/li-ning-badminton-catalog-2021FW.pdf

    Overview of the featured rackets:

    Tectonic series:
    7 (+Drive/Instinct/Combat)
    9 (3u/4u/5u)

    3D Calibar series:
    900 (+Boost/Instinct)
    600 (+Combat/Instinct/Boost)
    300 (+Combat/Boost)
    01 (+ Combat)

    Aeronaut series:
    9000 (+Instinct/Drive/Combat)
    7000 Instinct (2 colors) + Boost
    6000 (+Instinct/Combat/Drive)
    4000 (+Boost/Combat)

    Turbo Charging series:
    80
    70 + Instinct
    75
    50
    20 + Combat
    10 Boost + Combat
    01 + Drive

    Rackets that are missing and probably dicontinued (compared to the 2020 catalogue):

    3D Calibar series:

    900C - probably cut to boost the similarly specced Tectonic 9 and 7C
    800 - n80-II gone
    500
    200

    Aeronaut series:
    8000 (+Combat/Boost) - N99 gone
    7000 + Combat - since the 7000 was Zhang Nan's racket LN most likely cut it to now promote ZN's new BLADEX 800
    5000

    Turbo Charging series:
    75 Combat + Drive + Instinct
    70 Boost + Combat
    50 Combat + Drive
    20 Drive
    10

    It's a bit sad to see the N99 and N80-2 successors gone, especially sitting at slightly lower prices than the highend ones.

    Looking at the changes LN made to its racket rosters, it seeems they are thinning out on slightly headheavy 3u and 4u rackets.
    The lineups within each racket series offer several options at different price points and the high-end rackets, looking solid overall in my eyes.

    Interestingly, there seem to be no racket within the Instinct series which has been cut. This and the addition of several weight models (Tectonic 9 and AXForce 80 available from 3u to 5u) confirms the trend of going for lighter rackets for me and I honestly can't think of a better racket manufacturer to do this, combining the strong LN frames with light weight.
     
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  20. Sumanth99

    Sumanth99 Regular Member

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