net person not covering straight block from straight smash

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by amleto, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. vinod81

    vinod81 Regular Member

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    As a club player, I do not have a permanent doubles partner. I found about 40% percent of my random partners (mostly seniors like me-:)) do not move forward as you move back or vice a versa. Some of them waits until the opponent hits and then run forward if the opponent returns your smash with a stright block, but this leaves their side of the court vacant as I may also be trying to return the straight block.

    If this (your partner refuse to rotate) happens I will just play on my half of the court. Basically I will smash/ punch clear and move froward to defend any blocks/ drops.

    Please share if there is a better strategy other than the difficult task of teaching your unwilling partner the importance of TIMELY rotation.
     
  2. wristworks

    wristworks Regular Member

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    The basic strategy is simple: as long as partner A is attacking from the back, partner B's responsibility is to the front of the court, i.e. blocks, nets, drives. If you can't get the hang of rotational play, this should be the "go-to" strategy and it's true that players who fail to grasp this can be frustrating to play with. The reason why this is the basic strategy is that it ensures that your opponents are always lifting (and so you, in turn, always have the option to attack). Partner B (at the front), should never stop covering the front until Partner A clears.

    That's basic strategy. The problem is that rotation strategy works differently (and theoretically better) and some players don't know how to execute it properly, but choose to do it anyway because they see pros (or better players) do it. Rotation strategy dictates that if Partner A smashes and the opponent's reply is a weak, mid-court lift, partner A moves in and continues attacking while partner B backs away from the T to cover the diagonal. The problem is that some players don't understand that if you are partner B, you ONLY back away IF the reply is a weak, mid-court lift - if the reply is a straight block, then partner B is still responsible for taking the shot.

    Usually, I just let the shuttle drop when the opponents block and concede the point. If I'm playing recreationally, it's not as if there's anything at stake. If you make no attempt at fetching the shuttle, partners will start to clue in that it's because it's not your responsibility. It's a somewhat dickish/passive-aggressive way to get the point across but most players don't like being told how to play the game so what can you do.
     
  3. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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  4. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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  5. wristworks

    wristworks Regular Member

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    Oh yes, covering your partner at the back is a valid move, but not something I would teach to anyone UNTIL they've learned the basics. See, people see examples like your first video and think that it means that once your partner smashes, it means you automatically move towards the diagonal corner. Of course, what they can't tell is that as professionals, those guys can read the game to the point where the front-court player isn't just moving back automatically; he's moving back because he KNOWS the shuttle is because pushed there.

    Your second video actually makes a very clear point about this at 4:40 when the coach says something like "please remember that the front court is your first priority" or something. This is something that a lot of people don't execute when they play rotation.

    So yeah, I guess "only" is perhaps not the right word but I would make very sure that anyone understands that their first priority is to the front before making that exception.
     
  6. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    agreed :)
    ...................
     
  7. diverdan

    diverdan Regular Member

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    Level doubles should be an intuitive movement with your and your partner when the shuttle is either struck by you, your partner or the other the side. you should be anticipating and ready to move in any direction and to be ready to play any shot needed. Well that's the theory. how many of us do it?
     
  8. drrwong

    drrwong Regular Member

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    Just adding to the above threads regarding the rotation strategy: it is important to recognize that it is the front person who "initiate" that type of rotation. The reason is that the front person cannot see what the back person is doing (although he can sense it or guess it based on previous experience), while the back person can see what the front person is doing. So if the front person decides to back up and take the shot in the diagonal court, the back person has to yield.
    Also, the front person should really only do diagonal back-up move if he thinks his partner cannot get to the bird fast enough to continue smashing, and his first priority is still to cover the front of the court.
     
  9. Swift Freeze

    Swift Freeze Regular Member

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    When you are playing level doubles and you are in an attacking formation, one of you at the back and one at the front. The player at the front should be for the most part in line with the rear player.

    When smashing from one of the corners the front court player can take a step towards the centre of the court slightly using the tram lines to zone out replies outside of the reach. This is because 70%+ of all replies will be a straight lift or block because cross court replies are difficult if the smash is placed correctly.

    Depending on the distance the rear court player is from the base line, as someone else mentioned already, the front court player should keep a roughly half court distance. If the rear player is on the baseline, the front court player should be behind the service line by a foot or two.

    This is to give the front player, more time to intercept return shots because the steepness, angle and power of the smash will be less than a smash further up court.

    When the rear court player is smashing at 3/4 court, the front player needs to be on the service line or just ahead of it because the replies will usually be weaker due to the reduced reaction time, faster smash speed and angle comg up rather than flat.

    The front court player needs to have their racket up and ready at all times, looking for and hunting the shuttle coming back across the net. They need to try their best to be enough of a threat to cut out any flat fast shots cross court, reducing pressure on their partner, to pick up any block replies and intercept any straight drives.

    There will be times when your opponents do manage that cross court block or find the right speed and height to whip it past the net player but if you are playing the front court well this will be far less often than it may be currently.

    It is the rear court player's responsibility not to float any drops or smash too flat, which would put the front court player under pressure. Smashes and drops should be 90%, straight, at the body, or towards the centre line between the two defenders. Any smashes cross court open you up to a flat drive into the open space and immediately put you under pressure.

    I'm Male and much prefer Mens doubles to mixed, primarily because the level of women in the section I am currently in is no where near strong enough from the rear court. I am strong from the back of the court but I feel my speciality is front court and net play. If i had a female partner who was confident and strong from the back, full length clears, good drops and good angled and placed smashes I would be more than happy to cover the front.

    The only advantage men have at the back is slightly more power and slightly more agility. Of course this is only at the higher levels of play.

    Rotation is more difficult and is a different thing to simply covering the front court properly.
     
    #29 Swift Freeze, Mar 3, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  10. venkatesh

    venkatesh Regular Member

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    Exactly my point. But sometimes, these kinds of players tend to be arrogant, thinking that it wasn't their responsibility to cover, that they'd be smug about it and blame us (who are aware). And you're right: players don't like being told how to play; thus, might as well end the match by losing and wait for a different partner to play with :D LOL.

    It's obvious that those members who posted here have the same concept told differently. Perhaps they're not reading all the posts :). Anyways, this just proves that BCers have the same concept of rotation, which is very good to know.
     
  11. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

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    Many players at club level are playing recreationally and do not know or bother to play rotational doubles. Even here in Indonesia many of my friends, esp. who did not have any formal training, just play doubles side by side most of the time.
    Even if I told them I can never attack properly from the rear if nobody covers my ass in front they still don't change:crying:. Old habits die hard, I suppose

    Just change partner n hopefully you can find a complementing partner. Or just enjoy the game n find different groups to play with.
     
  12. SantaSCSI

    SantaSCSI Regular Member

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    I mostly play with a few players from our club regularely and I'm by no means the best player, but I am the only one who watches movies and reads up on tactics and stuff. I find it wildly irritating that if I mention things like moving from the T (like in this topic) I get the funny look.

    A lot of players at our club, except the pro's, do not move from the T, leaving those sides open while it can be easily covered by moving from the T.
     
  13. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Yes, this can be done but how many of the players you play with can move to the corners like that. In fact, can you move to the corners like that??? A lot of the international players have far better footwork than your UK club player LOL. Moving to the back corners like that needs a lot of training of footwork. :)

    In addition, I would imagine many players are better at moving to one corner rather than the other. Don't expect club players to do this. I'd expect higher county level players to start doing this.

    If at any standard lower than that, play a smash that helps your net player into the game. You can always tell them if you smash, it's your preference that the net player move the the left or right slightly to cover the straight return. Just ask them to do that only when playing with you - that's how communication in doubles helps ;)
     
  14. Licin

    Licin Regular Member

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    I guess you should start finding other badminton social club, that has players who are willing to cover your front court while you are smashing at the back..
     
  15. koyeng

    koyeng Regular Member

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    It's hard to communicate with your partner, especially if they think they are senior player, without any couching. Teach them how to play might hurt their feeling. It happen to me all the time as I play with different partner each week.

    Best thing to do just aim your smash to wherever he/she is standing. If the return straight forward to him, then it would be good.

    If you are going for a tourney, find a partner who understand this basic attacking formation. :)
     

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