Pushing in Doubles

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by drkzxeraph, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. drkzxeraph

    drkzxeraph Regular Member

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    So I was playing doubles the other day...

    I was playing against advanced players (with myself only an intermediate high-school level player), and I had some difficulty returning serves.

    My customary low serve return is to push it to the side of the court. The problem is, the opponent that is serving happens to be pretty tall, with really good reach, and every time I make a slight mistake on the angle of my push (e.g. a bit higher than normal, instead of a flat drive/downward shot), he just jumps sideways and smashes it right back at me.

    After the game, I asked how I could avoid that, and he said I needed to be able to push the birdie fast enough so that it would be able to pass him but have it so that it doesn't go out. But as I see it, if your opponent knows that the push is going to the side and has good reach/reflexes, he can easily get it anyway. And a crosscourt push is too risky, especially if the person in front has good reflexes, as they can return it immediately. I guess net shots/high lifts are an alternative as well, but the other player is swift enough to easily return my net shots (not to mention his net shots are better than mine...), and I don't like giving the opponent a chance to attack with smashes by lifting.

    Any ideas? Should I just improve the consistency of my shots, or....? :confused:
     
  2. weeyeh

    weeyeh Regular Member

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    Your opponent is most likely correct that the push is high enough for him to drive it back at you. I also sense that you might have been too predictable with a standard return. Try to mix the return with slice drops to the corners or straight drops down the centre, or like he suggested, a low push towards the baseline.

    You need to note where the server's partner stands too. If the partner is standing too far back, a push just behind the short service line becomes an option.

    You might also want to note where you are intercepting his serve -- the higher and closer to the net the better. If your partner and yourself are both offensive (usually true), the prerogative is to keep the shuttle as low as possible until one side gives up.
     
  3. Joseph

    Joseph Regular Member

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    Your push is high cause you're too slow getting to the net. Getting to the net faster means more options, better angles.
     
  4. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

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    Cross court pushes are NOT too risky. They are a very good choice of shot as long as both you and your partner cover the correct angles, and if fast enough. If he's cutting them off, the possibly you are taking it too low. One good thing to do is push it at him. Since he's tall, he has good reach but defence against his body will be much much weaker.

    It could also be the fact that you're over committing on the serve. What I mean by this is that many players rush short serves, wanting to push hard, and they end up not having enough time to play their own shot, making a bad return. Sometimes, it's better to move forward slightly, see where the gaps are and do a shallow lift/push into the gap. This can work better sometimes, rather than blindly trying to push it every single time.

    Adding drops, both to the centre and to the sides will help you a lot as well.
     
  5. gamepurpose

    gamepurpose Regular Member

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    Base on what you've said that your opponent are a higher level and a better skilled player than you are.
    What he said, I do agree with him, you're pushes are slow, that's pretty easy to catch. Mixing up the shots are of course is a good way. However, mixing up and your push shots are still slow, that still mean you gonna get yourself kill whenever you do ur push shot.

    Pushing harder doesn't mean it's gonna guarantee be out, Just practice your stroke. And pushing at him, and across are not dangerous as long as the speed is fast (because if the speed is too fast for him, he can't intercept it, and with the angle of the push shot is not a killed shot from the back of the court.)

    And yes to your last question, you should always improve your consistence of your shots. (any kind of the shots)

    I do believe this, MOST of the time, I said MOST only. Most of the time you know your own weakness better than anyone else. So his advice is true only if he really wants to show you a way to beat him.
     
  6. venkatesh

    venkatesh Regular Member

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    variation is the key

    If you can't push it, there are other options. Don't play on your opponents strengths. Obviously, your opponent anticipates your push. A good drop shot will maintain your attacking position. Be aggressive on the net. If he usually counterdrops, anticipate it. The advices above are correct. And your idea of not lifting is also correct. Just vary your shots and make it unreadable.
     
  7. Break-My-String

    Break-My-String Regular Member

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    Let's take quick look at your return of serve...

    (1) how far is your non-racq foot from the front service line when you stand to receive?

    (2) when you make contact with the shuttle, how far from the net is it made?
    ...is the shuttle just above the front service line (or "within" the receiver's court), or is the shuttle contacted somewhere between the net & the front service line?

    (3) how high is the contact made? ie/ ankle, knee, hip, chest, shoulders, net height or above?

    Cheers!
     
  8. b0urg301s13

    b0urg301s13 Regular Member

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    Wow...on the contrary...i prefer to push at taller opponents....shorter opponents can duck low and use over head to return...

    of course being said that..you need to have a good push...the key is at the wrist...you need to train it to be stronger...and of course timing...so when you push it would seem just like a bare whip on the shuttle...try to stand as up front as possible... and receive the shuttle as early as possible at its highest trajectory point... of course you need to anticipate a long serve as well...here you need to have a good backhand to clear just in case...again the key here is the wrist... make it stronger and practice makes it perfect.... just my 2 cents..
     
  9. drkzxeraph

    drkzxeraph Regular Member

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    Thanks for the help guys, it's really appreciated! =]
    So far the most urgent thing I need to address is my variation, I guess. Time to start working on those net shots, heh. And maybe some experimenting on drives and pushes with different trajectories.

    My contact point with the shuttle isn't all that bad. Unless I'm uncertain whether the serve is going out, I typically hit the birdie at net height. Well, actually, more often about an inch or two below, but only against good servers. I can almost always push downwards if the serve is just average.

    I think I stand a good foot and a half or maybe 2 feet from the service line. I'm actually a pretty good height myself, so rushing towards the net from that position with a decent speed is no problem. I'll probably keep standing that far away until I'm good enough to move backward quickly enough to return flick serves well.
     
  10. illusionistpro

    illusionistpro Regular Member

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    I dont believe height is necessarily the key here. I think a few members were correct when they said your shot selection and shot quality are the important factors. I know this because I too have this issue. I cant talk about one factor with out mentioning the other and here's why: If you hit the most perfect push every time, it doesn't matter. You could be playing against a child and its the same as feeding them a shuttle for practice (actually better than practice since the push is "perfect"). Now if you have a different shot every time, but its quality is bad like a high push, or a shallow lift, you are going to be eating birdies. It doesnt matter, that you are making different shots to keep the opponent guessing since you're not forcing him to move or make bad shots. You need to find a blend of both quality and variance, so that you can make a good shot that isnt going to be predictable.

    This really struck me since you said your "usual return." I suggest dont have a usual return, that is why this will happen. Try to have some fake push-drop, or fake pushes using your body movement/direction to misdirect your opponent. I find that one works well for me.
     
  11. Break-My-String

    Break-My-String Regular Member

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    Excluding your ability to make the shot, I would say that the higher and closer to the net when you receive the shuttle will give you the greater and better shot options.

    Compare your shot options when you receive the serve

    (A) low to the ground (ankle height) near the front service line (6.5 feet away from the net), versus
    (B) just below the net (shoulder height) 3 feet from the net

    Any net shots made in scenario A will get you killed, otherwise you would have to lift.

    In scenario B, you can do everything in scenario A (but your net shots will be much better!) plus any drives/pushes to the mid/rear courts with deception.

    Cheers!
     
    #11 Break-My-String, Sep 1, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2009
  12. weeyeh

    weeyeh Regular Member

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    I think illusionistpro is talking about the height of the player :).
     
  13. gamepurpose

    gamepurpose Regular Member

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    this is one of the reason why people would argue. misunderstanding. Don't read carefully enough.
     
  14. Break-My-String

    Break-My-String Regular Member

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    That’s right!...




    My primary focus was one step prior! How do you make the better “shot selection and shot quality”?...By receiving the shuttle higher and closer to the net!..."Read Carefully!"



    Ditto! Just like people's need to inject unproductive comments!...I am not directing this to Gamepurpose...Please Read This Carefully, don’t want any misunderstanding!

    Cheers!
     
    #14 Break-My-String, Sep 3, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009

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