Understanding all the hype about insoles

Discussion in 'Clothing & Footwear' started by VeritasC&E, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. VeritasC&E

    VeritasC&E Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Stockholm
    I would like to understand all the hype about insoles in the badminton community.

    I changed the insoles on one pair of walking shoes to compensate for slight leg size variation to prevent hip issues as I can walk very long distances some times, but I've never changed the insoles on any of my sport shoes, nor felt the need to, which is why I'd love to understand the hype.

    Instinctively I would think that the company that makes fancy sport shoes are the best able to develop a perfect insole that specifically fit these shoes and their intended characteristics, so I don't understand why the factory insoles shouldn't be the best ones at that price level.

    I have two pairs of SHB03Z with factory insoles, they both feel great, and except some superficial wear of the insoles, I think everything is alright with them. What could I gain from the best insole option for this model?
     
  2. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    525
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Before I tried different insoles I never even thought about them. I just always had top end shoes and thought they were good enough. However, since trying the spenco polysorb cross-trainer insoles I now can't go back to the default. Insoles are expensive, but until you put them side by side with the default ones from yonex, you won't realise how terrible the default ones are. There's way more cushion and bounce in the custom insoles and it is really quite noticeable when playing. Highly recommend trying it.
     
    VeritasC&E and visor like this.
  3. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    16,093
    Likes Received:
    1,723
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Probably to a young person in their teens to early twenties, it doesn't matter much, but for those older and with joint issues (knees, ankles, etc), then the default insoles offer nothing in the way of support or cushioning compared to some after market insoles like Spenco Polysorb Cross Trainer.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
    Scott Kam and llrr like this.
  4. LiteBulb

    LiteBulb Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Nowhere
    Does these insoles put you higher from the ground? I mean the thickness.
     
  5. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    525
    Location:
    Somewhere
    They're slightly thicker due to the extra cushioning, but I'd say it makes no difference and takes very little to get used to.
     
  6. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    525
    Location:
    Somewhere
    I would say considering badminton is so rough on the joints, having high quality insoles from early on probably helps delay or even prevent issues with knees etc. later. I hardly hear anyone talk about insoles even though they all have the best shoes racquets everything else. It was only through BC did I consider trying new insoles. I was really put off by their price at the beginning though, had to really tell myself to just pull the trigger and try it once.
     
  7. Scott Kam

    Scott Kam Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2003
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    I can't stop feeling remorse that I'd been ignoring the effect of insole until I got plantar fasciitis ;)
    It may not ve the case if you get a perfect foot arch ;)
     
  8. Scott Kam

    Scott Kam Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2003
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    Stock insoles can't customize the support of foot arches among others.
     
  9. VeritasC&E

    VeritasC&E Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Stockholm
    If they are thicker than the factory insoles, would this not lead to less side support from the shoe, and thus (slightly?) increased risk or ankle injury?
     
  10. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    525
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Nope
     
  11. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    219
    Location:
    UK
    Copied from the Karakal insoles thread as it is probably more relevant here...

    Yonex insoles are pretty thin and it is hard to find replacements of the same thickness. I wear Aerus 2 and found the yonex insoles were sliding about in the forefoot area and ruined them in a few weeks not to mention the discomfort of having the insole wrapped around a foot mid rally.

    I am currently testing out Sorbothane Full Strike and Sorbothane Sorbo Pro.
    Full strike are the thinnest and least supportive. Well, no support at all. They are almost too thin. They are quite narrow with no arch support or heel structure at all.
    Sorbo Pro are a little thicker but not as much as some and my heel only just fits into the shoe without slipping out. They have arch support and a heel structure.


    The Full Strike insoles are thin enough to replace the yonex insoles without compromising on the fit but as they are completely floppy and have no sort of structure or support it is hard to say they are an improvement. They merely fit and as the underside is slightly tacky they don't slip. They are probably not intended to be used as replacement insoles.

    The Sorbo Pro insoles are 4mm thick around the toes and 21mm at the heel. I would prefer the heel to be thinner but with the same cup shape around the heel and arch support. I might remove the gel pad under the heel to see if that helps. They work well as replacements but the heel does not feel as secured as it did with the old insoles.
     
    VeritasC&E likes this.
  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    16,093
    Likes Received:
    1,723
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    As I said in the other thread, your 21mm heel height is not properly measured. You can't measure the part that rises up as that is not where your heel and body weight is supported.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
  13. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    219
    Location:
    UK
    Sorry, 21mm is from the Sorbothane packaging and probably measured by a muppet - you are right that the centre of the heel is no more than 10mm probably less. But the structure that forms the heel cup has some extra depth to the material. It means the heel is cupped by more material than just a thin gel pad so sits higher than expected. Even 10mm is quite a lot in reality. 21mm would be unwearable.
     
  14. thyrif

    thyrif Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2015
    Messages:
    321
    Likes Received:
    215
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I've got Sidas 3 feet Active Mid high and they are amazing. My feet are way less tired after a session and the extra heel support and cushioning is great. I don't play without it anymore. These have three different heights to cater to different feet arches, mine was middle.
     
    VeritasC&E likes this.
  15. VeritasC&E

    VeritasC&E Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Stockholm
    I believe your arguments for the insoles, but dang it does not seem to be an easy step to pass:

    A) There is the price of these things (up to 40€ for insoles, which is the price of 4 pairs of shoes at H&M, or mid quality sport shoes). I'd rather pay the high price and get the perfect insoles right away (cheaper than mistakes), but that pricing makes any error VERY EXPENSIVE.

    B) There is the question of shoe fit. If I buy a perfect pair of insoles for X pair of Yonex shoes, is there any chance it might not be the perfect fit for my next Y pair of Badminton shoes?

    C) There is the fit issue. I have no idea what would fit my shoes / feet. An error in fit or insole type might cost the buyer an ankle injury (if too high vs the shoe lateral support), or up to 40€ for a new, more fitting pair of insoles. Better get the first shot right... (though I ignore how to?)
     
  16. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    525
    Location:
    Somewhere
    I agree, that's why I was so hesitant at the start too. You just have to go for one of the popular ones with lots of good reviews and try it. As for fit, they will fit all shoes and even if they don't, you can easily trim it to fit. The only thing you need to worry about when buying is to get the right size.
     
    VeritasC&E likes this.
  17. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    219
    Location:
    UK
    If you like yonex and only buy yonex then it is reasonable to expect the insoles to fit new yonex shoes for the next decade. They have not changed their core design for as long as I can remember and that is probably back to 2003 or earlier.

    By shopping around and looking for bargain prices and older models I have managed to spend around £60 on insoles to find ones that work for me. The sorbothane sorbo pro are currently my favourite because they are not going to extremes with arch support or cushioning. At some point my experiment must end or I will end up spending enough to buy another topend racket. The insoles I have tried and not been happy with are not going to be wasted, they will go in other shoes and boots to replace far less suitable insoles.
     
    VeritasC&E likes this.
  18. thyrif

    thyrif Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2015
    Messages:
    321
    Likes Received:
    215
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I found it very helpful to go to a shop who has a couple different ones, bring my badminton shoes, and try some! You need to feel what they do. Or if that is not an option you could order a couple and try at home, then return the rest you didn't choose.
     
    VeritasC&E likes this.

Share This Page