Improved Singles & Doubles Gameplay | Any tips/advice appreciated

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Starik, Dec 11, 2019.

  1. Starik

    Starik New Member

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    I originally played and posted a singes video on August 30th, 2019 to here and Reddit in hopes of helping improve my singles game. I am now posting an updated game play showing my *I hope* improvement between August 30th and now early December in both disciplines. I welcome any advice!

    I have been in total playing for about 10 months.

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    Original singles video (August):



    Updated Singles:



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    Original Doubles (September 9):



    Updated Doubles:

     
  2. Ballschubser

    Ballschubser Regular Member

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    It is hard to compare your game when there are only a few month inbetween (and other opponents with different skill level).

    So, I'm just refering to your updated single video, some things you could try to improve on. Best to pick up one thing you want to focus on and try to practise this aspect for some time.

    0:40 First of, a more neutral stance would help. You had enough time to get in a square ready stance to receive the next shot. Then you should observe your opponent. There was zero deception and from the arm position alone a long clear is really unlikely. In this case I would try to anticipate a drop (easier said than done).

    0:50, 5:53 A tactical tip. Playing a very fast or short, slow attack (e.g. smash or short drop shot) as service return bears always the risk of a hard counter for beginners. You need to remember, that the server right after the serve is in a perfect position to receive your attack, especially if he is able to 'provoke' and anticipate an attack from you. More variance in your shots (fast drop shot, clear, attack clear, sliced drop shot etc.) will help you, so that your opponent can not anticipate a certain shot, reducing the risk of a hard counter. These are situation where you put yourself under more pressure than your opponent.

    1:04, 1:45, 5:40 I've the same bad habit. You play some good low serves and suddenly you have the feeling to break up your pattern and do a flick serve, thought your low serve is not really challenged at all. Try to keep up your low serves as long as the opponent did not challenge it (e.g. at a certain point they will anticipate it and take it really early to push it into the corners).

    1:20, 6:22 After your play, you move backward. Try to ready up as quickly as possible (square stance) and don't move while the opponent is playing the return. A good opponent will see your movement and he will play to the corner opposite of your movement, changing direction while moving is very hard.

    2:15 & 3:40 Control of pace. You return a smash with a fast lift and speeding up the pace of the rally. As a beginner high paced games are not the best choice, you should try to slow it down first (e.g. just block it to the frontline without any angle).

    2:55 Nice push.

    3:10,6:53 A flat push to the back corners is one of the more dangerous returns of a low serve for beginners, who are unable to intercept it yet. It will put you under pressure. To reduce the risk, try to aim your serve at the T-cross. This has the advantage, that you opponent has less time to react and has a bad angle to push (in other words, it is easier for you to intercept a flat push).

    5:05 Nice drive return.

    7:11 Even if you hit the net, you were really early to the shuttle, good job.

    8:16 Again, quick reaction and the right idea. Little more experiences and you will get more points from these situations.
     
    #2 Ballschubser, Dec 13, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
    Starik likes this.
  3. Starik

    Starik New Member

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    Thanks for this, I know you put a lot of work into it and I appreciate it :) some really good tips in here.
     

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