In what order to coach a beginner?

Discussion in 'Coaching Forum' started by Athelete1234, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    I'm gonna try coaching somebody later on, but I sorta need to know what kind of skills to focus on first. I'm thinking:

    1: Grip. Neutral grip, first, forget about backhands, panhandle, bevel, thumb, etc

    2: Forehand clear. Pretty much get down that you need to rotate forearm in a smooth, but explosive swing, open up shoulders to gain power, etc. I'll probably toss in lifts here too, it's not the hardest thing to teach if the grip is ok.

    3: Some sort of footwork, probably gonna teach split step, basic footwork, etc. Scissor kick and body rotation will either be here, or when I'm teaching the clear.

    4) Variations in overhead strokes:
    basic straight drop, smash, etc. Using similar swing and technique with clears, just you're hitting down, variation in power, etc.

    5) Drives, netshots, other skills which will involve different grip and situations.

    6) Around the head stuff, basic backhands, when to use fancier grip, etc.

    Does that sound like a plan? I wanna make sure that these skills are taught in a logical order which will be practical and effective.

    I really want to stress the correct skills first because I don't want that person to be screwed over and have to relearn their skills later like I had too.
     
    #1 Athelete1234, Aug 9, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2008
  2. badgiler

    badgiler Regular Member

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    Yeah, your plan looks alright. Dont forget teaching how to serve too, hee..hee.

    Couldnt agree more that a player's skills built on sound and proper foundation is of utmost importance. You would probably want to start some sort of strength/conditioning training so that your students (i believe you are a coach...?) would be ready physically whenever training intensity is increased.

    Thanks for starting this thread...Hope more would share their knowledge and expertise here....anyone?
     
  3. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    Nah, I'm not a coach, just a player, but I would like to try coaching and developing more players. If this plan is alright, then I hope it'll go smoothly.
     
  4. badgiler

    badgiler Regular Member

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    Train hard....hope u do well. Who knows one day we may even see u in Super Series etc. :)
     
  5. Mikael

    Mikael Regular Member

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    I strongly disagree:

    1) Today you learn beginners all the grips from the start, otherwise you will need to unlearn later. Show it easy by making a circle around them and showing that in front of body forehand will be panhandle and moving towards outside the body then basic grip and the more behind of the body, forehand, towards thumb grip.

    2) It also depends on the purpose, do they just want to play for fun once a week, or do they expect to become elite players? Look at some of the chinese videos learning children, they have no fun at all?
     
  6. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    I feel more interested in teaching what grip is for what, and in what situations each grip is used for. I think a compromise would work, where I would explain each type of grip and demonstrate, and then focus on each type of grip one at a time.

    As for the second point, this is just to teach a beginner some skills. It's not hard core or anything, cause I'm not a real coach just somebody trying to explain and demonstrate the skills required of badminton, and so it's mostly fun, with a goal to improve.
     
  7. badgiler

    badgiler Regular Member

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    For teaching beginners, the program looks alrite to start with. When the beginner student has shown the progress and achieved the standard which you hv set earlier then you can start teaching a standard higher than beginner standard for each skills etc. I believe there must be a platform to start with and the next platform to reach after and so forth..

    Another impt thing is, i believe as a coach is knowing what you are teaching and walking beside them & seeing through your student's achievements, with them. The sky is the limit.

    Another mark of a good coach is to embark on a lifelong coaches' training and education.

    All the best my friend....

    "Soar like an eagle"
     
  8. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Bear in mind that all this stuff takes time to learn. He won't master the forehand clear in a week. ;)

    You need to be flexible about what you teach: it depends on the player's current abilities. Here are some questions I always think about:
    • What are his biggest weaknesses?
    • What improvement would make the biggest difference to him winning points/games?
    • What improvement is the least challenging?
    • What improvement takes the least time?
    • What does he want to learn?
    Some skills are easy to learn and make a big difference; for example, the backhand low serve in doubles. Start with these.

    After you have exhausted all the "quick fixes", you're left with skills that are harder to learn. Some of these make a big difference, such as a forehand clear. Do these next.

    Then you're left with skills that are hard to learn and don't make a big difference, such as the backhand clear. Leave these till last.

    Of course, you can mix it up too: you can vary the teaching so that it doesn't get boring. Arguably, parallel learning is more efficient than purely linear learning anyway; but do make sure you apportion your time sensibly (so you should spend more time teaching the forehand clear than the backhand clear, for example).

    As for the grips: I like to teach them with a shot. I don't see much point in teaching all the grips at the start; players will understand a grip best by learning how to use it.
     
    #8 Gollum, Aug 13, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2008
  9. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    Alright thanks for the advise guys. :)
     
  10. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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  11. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The following form the fundamentals and could also be the order to coach beginners new to badminton:
    1. How to use a proper grip.
    2. Stroke production:
    -Overhead strokes: smashes, clears, drops.
    -Side-arm and under-arm strokes: lifts, net shots, drives, returns of smash.
    -Sevice and return of service: low, drive, flick, high serves, and their returns.
    3. Footwork.
     
  12. blundey

    blundey Regular Member

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    I learned loads using just my own kinda grip pan handle, i then had to unlearn everything and relearn with the correct grips and this was very very very frustrating. So if your going to teach a beginnner, teach them the correct way first.
     
  13. iyusim

    iyusim Regular Member

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    1. Grips - forehand backhand, fast switching technics
    2. short serve (for kids backhand serve is easier) - include basic rules of single play
    3. net play - including basic footwork
    4. drive - improving arm swing and side-to-side footwork
    5. long serve - improving control on the shuttle movment
    6. clear - backline movment

    these are the 6 basics I teach
     
  14. krisss

    krisss Regular Member

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    I think these coaching suggestion in order are good :D. They seem pretty logical
     
  15. CoachEngholm

    CoachEngholm Regular Member

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    In what order...

    This is the right order: (For Children age 5-10)
    1: Larne backhand grip
    2:Moving to the side using chasses ending on the right foot. (Right foot for right handed)
    3:Short backhand serve often without the net. Aim for a box or something
    4: Learning forehandgrip, and loose grip
    5: Learning drop shot with low net. Holding loose grip. Always using footwork. Moving towards the net using chasses and ending on right foot
    6:Dropshot in forehand.
    7:Lift in backhand using finger power. Shuttle doesn’t have to reach the backline
    8:All kinds of underhand strokes at the first ½ of the court. Moving fast towards shuttle remembering to show balance while stretching both arms when hitting shuttle.

    These are the first steps.
    Look at my YouTube channel. All players are taught that way...
    http://www.youtube.com/CoachEngholm


    Best wishes
    CoachEngholm
     
  16. TheBear

    TheBear Regular Member

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    With respect, this is AN order, as correct or incorrect as any other so far suggested.
    And all players are NOT taught that way. Let's not try to get proscriptive about this.:D
     
  17. CoachEngholm

    CoachEngholm Regular Member

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    Hello TheBear.

    When I worte "all players are taught that way..." I was referring to the players from my YouTube-channel...
    I've had those players for severel years now, and THEY ARE TAUGHT THAT WAY..."
    Sorry...
    Best wishes
    CoachEngholm
     
  18. krisss

    krisss Regular Member

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    Your players look good whilst playing.

    But there net play - they take them quite low?

    And some of them seem to use quite a tight grip?

    Do you teach the players to "drag" their feet?
     
  19. CoachEngholm

    CoachEngholm Regular Member

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    [FONT=&quot]Hello Krisss

    Actually my players are some of the most offensive at the net, at least here in Europe. At European Championships in Belgium this year, it was clear to see that they were the players that made the largest number of kills at the net.
    But when we’re training drop shot it's very important to relax in shoulder and arm...letting your lower arm, wrist and fingers do the work.
    What clip are you referring to?! Remember that every lesson has a certain focus area, so it depends on what clip you are referring to...
    As a right handed you always drag your left foot approaching the net....?!

    Please notice, that all the clips are filmed during private lessons with my players...and we are of course training the areas that need work, the areas that are a problem for the players at the clip. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]Nice getting some criticism…the players are all either European Champions, National Champions, National Team Champions or at top 10 I Denmark. I’m always told that they are some of the best players we’ve had for several years, and that their technique are perfect, or at least almost perfect.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]But if you have some areas that needs work, let me know;-)

    Best
    CoachEngholm[/FONT]
     
  20. TheBear

    TheBear Regular Member

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    CoachE - your English puts my inability to speak Danish to shame. I guess your meaning was simply missed in the translation.
    I wish you good luck with your youngsters.
     

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