My Smash in Doubles is Better Than In Singles

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by precrime3, Feb 5, 2020.

  1. precrime3

    precrime3 Regular Member

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    As the title suggests,

    I feel like my smashes in doubles are better technique wise, faster, etc.

    I feel more in position for double smashes than singles.

    Is this just simply my perception or perhaps bad footwork? For example, in doubles I can focus on being in the back and not worry about the front so I'm in better position to receive lifts for a smash?

    Do I just need to work on my technique and footwork to reach the shuttle faster in singles, and work on the smash technique as well so I can smash faster (not the shuttlecock itself, but like lifting up my racket and the actual swing)
     
  2. SimonCarter

    SimonCarter Regular Member

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    At pro level double player smash harder than in single, of course when you are sitting at the back it is easier to get in position. You can always improve your technique and footwork but there will always be that position at the back that gives an edge when smashing in doubles compared in single. Another very big difference is that in singles even if you are in position to full smash this is rarely the best choice because a short defense will be too difficult to reach in singles whereas in double it is up to your partner to get it so you can go all in on the smash.
     
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  3. precrime3

    precrime3 Regular Member

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    Ah interesting. Is that why there are much more half smashes in single? But what about really aggressive singles players like Giting? How does he get away with being so aggressive?

    I do realize that Momota is #1 and has a more defensive play style so would it be safe to say that playing a defensive way is "meta"?
     
  4. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Singles we don’t need full power. A steeper smash with 80% power is more advantageous than a full power flatter smash.
     
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  5. precrime3

    precrime3 Regular Member

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    Good to know. Steeper smashes are made through jump smashes, as well as forcing them to make a short lift or a net that's too high right?
     
  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Jumps have a trade off.

    I would rather do a standing smash and good technique with good recovery for the next shot, rather than a jump smash which is slightly steeper but more unbalanced afterwards.
     
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  7. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    It'ssimple:

    In doubles your head is free and with a solid partner, you can be confident that he/she will intercept, block anything which will help you to recover. In singles you must always have in mind that if you smash, it get countered or blocked and you will take it below the net. The attack period in doubles until you switch to defence is much much longer. In singles the attack period is shorter. In doubles you can built up the big smash with dropshots, half smashs and so on to create the big smash due a longer attacking period. The opponents are more prone to lift. In singles it can result after one attacking shot, that it result in net play. A good recovery is a must. In singles you need to cover a larger area and that means that you are more seldom in perfect position while your opponent is off balance to hit a winner.
     
  8. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Indeed, it's so simple that it can really be boiled down to asking, "what's the worst that can realistically happen if I do a full 100% power smash?".

    Doubles: realistically, worst is you lose the attack as with two players, you're likely to at least be able to lift/push/drive/block a good defence. Two players on a court can cover the 80%+ of the court within racquet reach, and 99%+ within 1 step/jump.

    Singles: realistically, worst is you outright lose the point because the recovery is far too strenuous on a full power jump out smash to even reach a good defence. One player on the court can mean up to 3-4 steps to reach a return, even at pro level.
     
  9. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    Sorry, but these numbers are exaggerated. If not, you can defend in singles any smash to the sides by standing because the singles court is 20% more narrow than in doubles. ;)

    Realistic is up to ~75% with one step in doubles. Or can you cover a half court by 80%+ in racket reach and 99%? My lunge with racket infront is around 2,1m. Take into account the you and your partner don't have clear borders on court and the areas for court coverage overlap. The faster pace and quicker reaction time in doubles is IMO not compareable to the area. Steps in doubles are sometimes very small. Just have the orientation in mind on defence when the lift goes from one side to the other. IMO realistically the worst is you lose the point at the pace. 99%+ coverage with one step or jump is not realistic.



    This drill shows how large the court is, even when you are pretty low.
     
  10. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Exaggerated if you are going to consider literally touching 80% of the court with your racquet outstretched with someone hitting vertically dropping shuttles. Not so exaggerated if you consider the likely responses to an attacking pair, and the fact that more returns will be flatter in doubles as you need the speed to build pressure in doubles.

    If you're in a sides attack orientation, really you will cover a huge amount of space within 1 racquet length because there's not a huge amount of viable strokes your opponents can return a half decent attack with. Reactions and time pressure is so much more important than raw movement in doubles after all.

    The 99%+ within 1 step is probably pushing it, as it's normally 1.5-2 steps to a lift if the return is not a block/counter-drive.
     
  11. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

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    I think we have a misunderstanding here. Coverage in doubles mean to me that I'm able get into a position to play a shot with quality and not only to touch the shuttle. I think you assume that it is just a pushing and outstretched reachment without having hitting in your mind.

    I would be highly interested how you come to such numbers. Because I still doubt them based on my body height (I'm not Frodo ;)) my arm lenght and the size of the doubles court. Are their based on your experience?

    [​IMG]

    Just one of douzens situations that even in the attack the court has room, that you can't cover 75% with racket reach and 99%+ with one step when somebody can return a decent attack in different ways than mediocre straight blocks and straight lifts. As said before I'm really interested how you come to such numbers and it's background.
     
  12. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Misunderstanding indeed - the situation is worst case scenario if you play a full power smash as rearcourt doubles player vs. singles i.e. ability to return the shuttle over the net for one more shot. In other words, the worst case scenario is that you lose the attack.

    Common scenario - rearcourt player plays 100% smash straight, opponent pings it as a crosscourt counter drive when net player was expecting straight, has to do an emergency backhand/RTH loose block and suddenly we're in defence. If the opponents are half decent, they will have followed up the counter drive and are likely to press the attack quick heavily, but it's not a lost point...yet!

    In singles, you'd lose the point outright, because you won't even be able to touch the shuttle, quality or otherwise. I've got countless example of my own videos of smashing at inopportune times :)
     
    #12 DarkHiatus, Feb 8, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2020

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