Progression of a female player trying to make it, maybe try dying so but she attempted

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by DanNguyen, May 23, 2018.

  1. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    Hi, I am the female in blue. Would you guys please let me know how should i improve?
    I am aware of my weakness in forehand rear court due to taking the shuttle late, I have been annoyed with that shot of mine for 3 months now and try to move faster to get behind the shuttle. My mind is just wire to take the shuttle late and play mediocre shot :/
    Please helpp
     
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  2. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    You forgot to attach something, I think. Unless you are referring to the stick figure in your profile picture, which is not blue but black. :D
     
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  3. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    haha sorry i was too eager. The wifi at my uni is a bit bad. I don’t know how to attach one so here is the link

    Thank you all who will be commenting/criticising
     
  4. BadBadmintonPlayer

    BadBadmintonPlayer Regular Member

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    First tip: Talk more to your partner! Just as you're playing with your left hand, you'll break some rackets. "I","You", or something like that is helpful for balls in the middle.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Tactim

    Tactim Regular Member

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    Overall, decent! I see that you are very active in hunting the shuttle, you have a split step to prep for the next shuttle. Overhead technique is decent, decent footwork to get behind the shuttle and you have a scissor kick to put some more body weight behind the shuttle. As such, you were actually more threatening from the backcourt than your male partner because your footwork and overhead technique are superior.

    The main thing thing aside from more refined technique (then again that applies to almost everyone) is placement and awareness of your opponent’s position. The female opponent often is often at the front of the court despite them lifting/clearing. But several times you and your partner hit the shuttle straight to the female in the front instead of hitting to the sides, many times which you lost the point because of that. 2:37 you had a shoulder height shot in your forehand corner (which you already established as a weak shot) which you tried to play a cross court drive, right into the female opponent’s racket. A straight flat drive would have been a much more effective shot. If you can hit a cross court forehand drive relatively hard, then you can definitely hit a straight drive flat and hard. Most likely with that shot, you would get a very weak reply that your partner would be able to kill, or you would get a half length lift out of it to get a decent smash off of.

    There were also a couple instances in which the female opponent was also at the net, but you tried to take a late net shot to redrop at the net, both of which your shots landed in the net because the female opponent was right there in front of you. If you were there very early and took the shuttle at net height, the female opponent would have a much harder time making an aggressive return unless they had good technique at the net (your opponent did not).

    Overall there is no one obvious weakness in your game that I would fix besides more playing experience and working on peripheral vision of your opponent’s, and adjusting your shot selection to exploit the gaps in your opponent’s positioning. You don’t play lazily which helps a lot with your speed and footwork.

    One last tip for late, low forehand corner shots that are around chest or upper abdomen height. If you don’t want to hit a power drive or clear from that corner, you can also hit a straight or cross slice drop in almost a chopping moment that will brush the shuttle from an almost up to down motion, causing the shuttle to land very close to the front of the net. However would not recommend to the shot if the opponent is a sitting at the net as this shot tends have relatively slow speed in return for landing very close to the net. Most people lift off the this shot, giving you hopefully a better opportunity to smash or drove the shuttle.

    Good luck! Hope you post another video soon.
     
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  6. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    Thank you all for your help and guidance! I will keep working on my court awareness and communication. In relation to my forehard rearcourt, I dont understand the china jump at all. As you said Tactim, i executed the scissor jump quite often and got my power from there. However with the china jump am I supposed to take the shot when jumping back? It is for me a weak shot, doesnt matter if i can take the shot earlier and higher I still often tumble (not literally) backward after the shuttle already left racket face.
    Thank you again for your kind words and tips everyone!
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Is this Harrow Leisure Centre ? LOL.

    Good play. Active footwork and bounce and you get down low very well.

    When you come into the net, and the opponents have to hit the shuttle upwards,, keep the racquet head above the net level and above your head rather than at your waist height. This will mean you can intercept faster and also look more imposing to the opponents.

    A second note is you probably feel you can't get your racquet to the shuttle quick enough on the faster shots. You look as if you move your body to the shuttle and then you move the arm sequentially. In fact, what we want to do is to move the arm almost simultaneously with the body movement on the preparation.
     
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  8. Tactim

    Tactim Regular Member

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    Yes the shot which you call the China jump is executed when jumping backwards. However it’s a shot that requires very quick acceleration backwards, anticipation of the shot, and good technique because you don’t really rotate your body much to give you power. Ideally though you’re moving fast enough to where you’re hitting with body rotation.

    The main situation I would consider using a China jump in doubles is if the opponent made a flatter aggressive lift or push and you didn’t have time to get behind the shuttle completely . Therefore you had a quick shuffle and jump off your racket foot, try to hit an offensive shot if you can. The reality is that this shot can not be compared to if you had time to get behind the shuttle and set up. Your shots will be more limited. Practicing this footwork and shot will give you more time as you play more.
     
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  9. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    Thank you Cheung. Thank you for this! My racket pull back technique is indeed slow! I will train to pul it back simultaneously. And this is Sportspark at University of East Anglia : D
     
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  10. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    Thank you Tactim! Thay explains a lot!
     
  11. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    This is quite a tough shot to play and requires a lot of leg strength plus the appropriate training with shuttle feeds.
     
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  12. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    If you go to around 6.25, the opponents hit to your backhand side and you run back to play the overhead. It happens on two rallies. You have exactly the same preparation. When you move, your arm sticks out to the side and very low down. Try not to do this. As you start to move, try to keep the arm up and behind you. It will feel quite strange to change but you will find that you will eventually be playing a greater number of downward shots (drops or smashes) and of better quality rather than clears.
     
  13. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    First of all, your footwork and technique is superior to all other players on that court. I Think you'd have trouble to cope with a higher speed when playing with (against) better players though. The basics are there, but there's always a lot to work on.

    It looks like you use the same grip for every single shot. This lmits you and will lead to awkward movements. Paul Stewart has a video on changing the grip between forehand (basic/ V-/...) grip and backhand (thumb) grip. Actually, you might be doing what he is mentioning as a mistake at the beginnign of the video. This will not only make it more difficult to change grips, but also limit the effect of forearm rotation (pronation/supination), but first things first. Here are some pictures of the most common grips:
    180524_badminton_grip.jpg Don't worry about the german words too much. At the top (right), it's the basic/forehand/V-grip, left is the thumb/backhand grip and at the bottom right is the rush/panhandle grip. The illustrations are for right handed players, but i guess you get the picture. To me, it looks like you are using something in between the forehand grip and the rush grip for every shot. It's good to know that, but you should pratice to change grips between rush/panhandle, basic/forehand, and thumb/backhand grip, but please keep in mind that thos grips are the extreme sides of it and most shorts will be played with something in between. For example, most backhand shots will be played with a grip between the basic/forehand and the thumb/backhand grip by just taking your thumb to sit with its side at the edge of the handle instead of taking a full backhand grip (thumb completely on the flat side of the handle). Actually, I teach to use the full backhand grip only when serving (most people will use it when needed without teaching them when they know the technique).
    Another important point about grips is to have a relaxed grip, so you can tighten your hand at (or just before) the point of impact to give som extra power (smash, clear, ...) or even to execute deceptive shots (flick (serve), ...). In Germany, coaches like to think about it using triangles:
    180524_locker-fest.jpg
    Therefore, it is important that your grip is correct (see Paul's video).

    Then, you already identified taking a shuttle low at the back as one of your weak points. I think this is due to missing/weak pronation (inward rotation) of the forearm. And this might be due to the grip (see above and the beginning of Paul's video). Using pronation (supination), you can hit powerful forehand (backhand) drives from the backcourt. I didn't go through it, but normally, the badminton bible is a good resource. Good rotation will also help to produce more powerful shots in different situations when you cannot use your body (you're doing very well there, when you have anough time!), like (but not limited to) a stick smash or any stroke using a china jump (as mentioned by others before).

    That was a lot already, but I think that's some basics you are missing/need to improve, but there is more that's not obvious against opponents like that. I'll ry to keep it short though :D.

    When playing against opponents who try to rush your serve, it will become obvious that it's too high and too inconsistent. Good news: It's the easiest shot to practice. While some will say your technique on it is good, I'd change it. I've been tought at least three different ways of doing it by four high level coaches, so I've tried for myself and let others try and I prefer this way:
    • (not that important, but since you already do it anyway) put your racket foot in front
    • use a backhand (full thumb) grip; relaxed grip as always
    • hold your racket arm (almost) at shoulder height, the elbow very slightly bent
    • angle the racket (shaft) just slightly downwards (around four o'clock for a leftie)
    • tilt the racket such that the strings are facing slightly upwards*, so the shuttle will fly upwards
    • slightly shift your weight/balance to your front (racket foot); this will make shure you have enough space between the shuttle and your body
    • hold the shutte with your thumb and index finger only (like a dirty sock), getting the other fingers out of the way (either bending or spreading them)
    • put the shuttle in front of the strings, the cork will be tilted towards the strings slightly
    • stabilize the entire system by touching the racket (always the same spot of the frame) with the metacarpal of your thumb
    • pull back the racket, dont change the angle of the racket compared to the floor/net/... anything fixed by bending (flexing) your elbow
    • push the racket straight through the shuttle; put just enough pressure on your fingers so the impact will not move your racket (a flick serve is achieved by tightening your hand explosively at the point of impact
    *vary this angle to get the best path of the shuttle, then vary the strength of the shot to hit the line consistently

    As said before, there are other ways of doing a backhand serve, but this one has a few advantages. It will let you prepare in the same way every time. Even if you are weak, you can hit a good flick serve with the same preparation. It is a very very straight movement, so it's not prone to errors even in very tense situations.
    What I see most people (kids) forgetting about is to (slightly) shift their balance on their front (racket) foot. They'll start trying to hit using their wrists again which will be much less consistent, so don't forget about that if you try this.

    Alright, that was pretty detailed again, but maybe it helps to actually help you with the serve. Some other things were pointed out by others, like keeping the racket up at the net, better (earlier and quicker) preparation for overhand shots, better perception and awareness of the situation (position of partner, position of opponents, your position AFTER hitting), .... There always is a lot to work on!

    That being said, you are doing great, you are doing many things correctly and I'd be so happy to have more people with your basics in the groups I coach, because that seems to be rare. Keep improving! And don't worry about getting critique here, coaches are trained to find and point out mistakes. If something is good or even perfect, it's just not worth mentioning. :)
     
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  14. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    I can’t thank you enough for your analysis right there sir! I have also noticed that whenever I am late and need to do a strong straight forehand clear, my shot often goes wide. This is probably due to incorrect grip as you mentioned.
    Can I ask what shot is the basic/forehand grip is for? I understand the panhandle grip with any forehandshot and thumb grip for backhand.
    I would love to learn some more from coach but at the moment I am working night shift so i can’t find any coach around my place :<
     
  15. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    I actually read that the link you reference to before but I didnt even put it into use! I guess without the keen eye of a coach one just doesn’t know where things go wrong. I learnt many things, for the better or worse, from professional matches (Thank god there are Gillian Clarke and Morten Frost to analyse the techniques and strategies).
    But as you said, badminton is a game of subtlety. I am not trained enough to pick up the importance of grip just through videos! Thank you so so much for your advice
     
  16. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    You should ask about everything you want to know!

    It's for most overhead and overhand forehand strokes and for underhand forehand lifts with a low contact point, but honestly, don't worry about your grip during games. Worry about it when learning/practicing and after the game if something didn't feel right. Your grip seems to work for you when you have the time to use your body (and for those strokes it's probably the best anyway).

    In general, you use the basic grip for all strokes with strong pronation, but even then it will look different for different shots. For a stock smash, you'll close it and hold your handle tightly (--> hammer grip), because it's easy to use pronation with that grip and closing the gap between your index and middle finger will allow the racket to rebound and you'll be ready again right away. For a overhead smash, you'll use something in between a basic and a rush grip (like you do) despite using much pronation (and the rest of your body), because a normal basic grip would make the shuttle to the side opposite of your racket hand when hitting on front of your body.
    Grips are complicated when talking about (you might have realized that by now), but they are not that complicated in reality. Just practice your shots with the correct/best grip, practice changing grips (you can do this at home), and practice relaxing and tightening your grips (and be amazed how much your racket will move, this you can also do at home)... The rest will come to you by itself. Don't worry about your grips during games. It's not necessary once you get used to using different grips and it will take your focus away from the important things (for example the shuttle).

    Keep in mind, it's really hard to see your grip on a video (some rotate the racket slightly while hitting), especially from that angle. I got the impression mainly due to your overall movement. And your grip is not wrong. It's just not the best for every stroke, for some it is.

    Edit: Having a coach is always better than videos of others or feedback on your videos. If you learned everything so far by watching videos, it would be truly amazing and I'd wonder what you could achieve with a good coach.
     
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  17. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    This .. :)
     
  18. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    Any news? Any updates? Any progress?

    I was just reminded of this thread when replying someone else, so I thought I could ask. ;)
     
  19. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    I came back to Vietnam and have myself a coach over here. There were many times i want to record my games over here but haven’t found the opportunities to. I did record several gameplays that i found interesting/have something to learn from. Hopefully i can record myself soon.
    Thank you for the reminder <3
     
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  20. DanNguyen

    DanNguyen Regular Member

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    Here is a video taken just now. A very different game and not so good angel of camera. Please let me know what you think I will update soon with better camera angels
     

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